Patients Presenting to the Emergency Department with Non-emergent Chief Complaints

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/162864
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Patients Presenting to the Emergency Department with Non-emergent Chief Complaints
Abstract:
Patients Presenting to the Emergency Department with Non-emergent Chief Complaints
Conference Sponsor:Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Year:2003
Author:Diesburg-Stanwood, Amy, RN, BS, NDc
P.I. Institution Name:University of Colorado Hospital and University of Colorado Health Sciences Center
Contact Address:4200 E. 9th Avenue, Box C288-8, Denver, CO, 80262, USA
Contact Telephone:303/372-8901
Co-Authors:Jill Scott, RN, PhD; Kathleen Oman, RN, PhD; Carolee Whitehill, RN, MS; and Jule Monnens, RN, BSN
Purpose: Limited access to medical care based on financial resources has resulted in large numbers of patients seeking primary care for non-medical emergency conditions in Emergency Departments (ED). This influx of patients is contributing to overcrowding and delays in care for patients with emergencies. In an attempt to identify non-emergent persons requesting emergency care, specially trained RNs and physicians performed a medical screening examination (MSE) after triage. Persons with non-emergent medical conditions did not receive additional ED treatment and were referred to community resources for follow up. The purpose of this study was to describe the characteristics of individuals who were deemed non-emergent and were referred to community-based services, their condition after 72 hours and their use of follow up health care services. Design: An exploratory descriptive design was used. Setting: The study was conducted from October to November 2002, in an urban academic medical center ED with approximately 50,000 visits/year. Sample: 225 individuals were determined by MSE to have non-emergent conditions. Methodology: All non-emergent cases were reviewed for chief complaint, demographics, and follow up after MSE. Phone contact was attempted after 72 hours to determine the person?s condition and if community resources were utilized. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, Chi-square and t-tests. Results: The sample was 52% female, with a mean age of 33 years. The most common chief complaints were extremity problems (17%), toothache (9%), medication refill (8 %), and back pain (7%). Follow up phone contact was made with 82 patients (37%). The primary reasons for no phone contact included: no answer after two attempts (56%), incorrect phone number (25%), no phone number (9%), and other reasons (10%). The majority (55%) reported their condition had improved; 39% were unchanged, 6% were worse. Thirty one people (40%) accessed community resources and 8 (26%) returned to another ED. No clinically significant associations were found between patient demographics and use of community resources. Conclusions: Most people presenting to the ED with non-emergent chief complaints did not access community resources and their condition frequently improved. Additional studies, with improved follow-up are needed before recommending that referring individuals to community resources is an acceptable practice. The public needs additional education about self care and appropriate use of Emergency Services. Future nursing interventions guided by Orem?s Self Care Theory addressing these needs are warranted. [Research Presentation]
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Emergency Nurses Association

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePatients Presenting to the Emergency Department with Non-emergent Chief Complaintsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/162864-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Patients Presenting to the Emergency Department with Non-emergent Chief Complaints</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Emergency Nurses Association</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Diesburg-Stanwood, Amy, RN, BS, NDc</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Colorado Hospital and University of Colorado Health Sciences Center</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">4200 E. 9th Avenue, Box C288-8, Denver, CO, 80262, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">303/372-8901</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">amy.stanwood@uchsc.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Jill Scott, RN, PhD; Kathleen Oman, RN, PhD; Carolee Whitehill, RN, MS; and Jule Monnens, RN, BSN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: Limited access to medical care based on financial resources has resulted in large numbers of patients seeking primary care for non-medical emergency conditions in Emergency Departments (ED). This influx of patients is contributing to overcrowding and delays in care for patients with emergencies. In an attempt to identify non-emergent persons requesting emergency care, specially trained RNs and physicians performed a medical screening examination (MSE) after triage. Persons with non-emergent medical conditions did not receive additional ED treatment and were referred to community resources for follow up. The purpose of this study was to describe the characteristics of individuals who were deemed non-emergent and were referred to community-based services, their condition after 72 hours and their use of follow up health care services. Design: An exploratory descriptive design was used. Setting: The study was conducted from October to November 2002, in an urban academic medical center ED with approximately 50,000 visits/year. Sample: 225 individuals were determined by MSE to have non-emergent conditions. Methodology: All non-emergent cases were reviewed for chief complaint, demographics, and follow up after MSE. Phone contact was attempted after 72 hours to determine the person?s condition and if community resources were utilized. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, Chi-square and t-tests. Results: The sample was 52% female, with a mean age of 33 years. The most common chief complaints were extremity problems (17%), toothache (9%), medication refill (8 %), and back pain (7%). Follow up phone contact was made with 82 patients (37%). The primary reasons for no phone contact included: no answer after two attempts (56%), incorrect phone number (25%), no phone number (9%), and other reasons (10%). The majority (55%) reported their condition had improved; 39% were unchanged, 6% were worse. Thirty one people (40%) accessed community resources and 8 (26%) returned to another ED. No clinically significant associations were found between patient demographics and use of community resources. Conclusions: Most people presenting to the ED with non-emergent chief complaints did not access community resources and their condition frequently improved. Additional studies, with improved follow-up are needed before recommending that referring individuals to community resources is an acceptable practice. The public needs additional education about self care and appropriate use of Emergency Services. Future nursing interventions guided by Orem?s Self Care Theory addressing these needs are warranted. [Research Presentation]</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T10:35:27Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T10:35:27Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
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