2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/162865
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Impact of the Forensic Nurse Examiner on Emergency Department Visits
Abstract:
Impact of the Forensic Nurse Examiner on Emergency Department Visits
Conference Sponsor:Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Year:2003
Author:Fleming, Eileen, MSN, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Summa Health System
Contact Address:41 Arch Street, Akron, OH, 44304, USA
Contact Telephone:330/375-7554
Co-Authors:Carol Powell, BSN, RN, FNE; and Denise Kropp, BS, BSEd.
Purpose: Domestic violence is an epidemic in this country. It is estimated that over 2.3 million people experience intimate partner violence annually. Emergency departments are among the top three resources used by abused patients. Medical personnel often are not adequately trained to intervene with victims of domestic violence. Our institution has a Domestic Violence Program with certified forensic nurse examiners. The purpose of this research was to examine the impact of the forensic nurse examiner interventions for reducing the number of subsequent intimate partner violence related ED visits. Design/Setting: This retrospective medical record study was conducted in a comprehensive domestic violence forensic program located in an urban Level I trauma center. Methodology/Sample: Cohort-reported data were collected through retrospective chart review for a convenience sample using investigator-developed instruments describing the intimate partner violence event and the intimate partner violence prior/subsequent ED visits. Chart reviews were completed for victims seen and assessed in the Developing Options for Violent Emergencies (DOVE) Unit during the period January 1, 2001 to June 30, 2001. Included were male (n=3) and female (n=113) patients. The mean age was 30.4 years (range 18-73). Results: The ED referred 68% of the victims to the DOVE Unit. Victims suffered physical abuse (99 %), psychological abuse (72%) and sexual abuse (4%). Interventions provided were photographs (94%), interview (99%), evidence collection (97%), physical exam (97%), and referrals (92%). Radiography (46%) and wound care (63%) were the most utilized medical resources. Forensic nurse examiners testified in 19 cases, which 12 had subsequent conviction. A significant McNemar's test (p=.0011) indicated that the proportion of post-intervention intimate partner violence related ED visits (n=3) was significantly different from the proportion of prior-intervention intimate partner violence related ED visits (n=18). Caution should be given to this statistic since other reasons could decrease ED visits post-intervention (e.g., fear, moved). A profile of the typical intimate partner violence victim referred for forensic nurse examiner interventions were described from the results such as demographics, payor, and intimate partner violence event specifics. Conclusions: The forensic nurse can impact subsequent ED visits by providing the victim with a support network through referrals and testimony. One measure of success was a high rate of conviction when the forensic nurse testifies. The forensic nurse examiner interventions provided to victims of intimate partner violence can be the catalyst that helps end the cycle of violence. [Research Presentation]
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Emergency Nurses Association

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleImpact of the Forensic Nurse Examiner on Emergency Department Visitsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/162865-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Impact of the Forensic Nurse Examiner on Emergency Department Visits</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Emergency Nurses Association</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Fleming, Eileen, MSN, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Summa Health System</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">41 Arch Street, Akron, OH, 44304, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">330/375-7554</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">Fleminge@summa-health.org</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Carol Powell, BSN, RN, FNE; and Denise Kropp, BS, BSEd.</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: Domestic violence is an epidemic in this country. It is estimated that over 2.3 million people experience intimate partner violence annually. Emergency departments are among the top three resources used by abused patients. Medical personnel often are not adequately trained to intervene with victims of domestic violence. Our institution has a Domestic Violence Program with certified forensic nurse examiners. The purpose of this research was to examine the impact of the forensic nurse examiner interventions for reducing the number of subsequent intimate partner violence related ED visits. Design/Setting: This retrospective medical record study was conducted in a comprehensive domestic violence forensic program located in an urban Level I trauma center. Methodology/Sample: Cohort-reported data were collected through retrospective chart review for a convenience sample using investigator-developed instruments describing the intimate partner violence event and the intimate partner violence prior/subsequent ED visits. Chart reviews were completed for victims seen and assessed in the Developing Options for Violent Emergencies (DOVE) Unit during the period January 1, 2001 to June 30, 2001. Included were male (n=3) and female (n=113) patients. The mean age was 30.4 years (range 18-73). Results: The ED referred 68% of the victims to the DOVE Unit. Victims suffered physical abuse (99 %), psychological abuse (72%) and sexual abuse (4%). Interventions provided were photographs (94%), interview (99%), evidence collection (97%), physical exam (97%), and referrals (92%). Radiography (46%) and wound care (63%) were the most utilized medical resources. Forensic nurse examiners testified in 19 cases, which 12 had subsequent conviction. A significant McNemar's test (p=.0011) indicated that the proportion of post-intervention intimate partner violence related ED visits (n=3) was significantly different from the proportion of prior-intervention intimate partner violence related ED visits (n=18). Caution should be given to this statistic since other reasons could decrease ED visits post-intervention (e.g., fear, moved). A profile of the typical intimate partner violence victim referred for forensic nurse examiner interventions were described from the results such as demographics, payor, and intimate partner violence event specifics. Conclusions: The forensic nurse can impact subsequent ED visits by providing the victim with a support network through referrals and testimony. One measure of success was a high rate of conviction when the forensic nurse testifies. The forensic nurse examiner interventions provided to victims of intimate partner violence can be the catalyst that helps end the cycle of violence. [Research Presentation]</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T10:35:28Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T10:35:28Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
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