2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/162866
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Awareness and Prevention of All Terrain Vehicle Injuries
Abstract:
Awareness and Prevention of All Terrain Vehicle Injuries
Conference Sponsor:Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Year:2003
Author:Glaser, Monta Rae, RN, CEN
P.I. Institution Name:St. John's Regional Health Center
Contact Address:1235 E. Cherokee Street, Springfield, MO, 65804, USA
Contact Telephone:(417) 885-3165
Co-Authors:Cindy Lowe and Roger Huckfeldt, MD, FACS
Purpose: While the number of all terrain vehicles (ATV) used for recreation and farming increases, little research and education is targeted toward associated injury awareness. The purpose of the study was to examine ATV related trauma admissions, assess common injuries, and compare injury severity for those wearing a helmet versus the unhelmeted. Design/Setting: A two year (2001-2002) retrospective study was conducted in a level 1 trauma center which admits more than 1500 trauma patients per year. Methodology: Analyses of 76 pediatric and adult patients was obtained from trauma registry data and individual medical records. Patients included in this study had significant injuries, which required a hospital admission of 24 hours or greater. The data included: age, Injury Severity Score (ISS), Glascow Coma Score (GCS), length of stay (LOS), helmet usage, type of injury, and hospital cost. Data was summarized with descriptive statistics using SPSS 10.0 for Windows. Results: Seventy-six patients between the ages 3 and 89 presented during the study period with an average age of 31. Only 5% of the patients were wearing a helmet. The mean ISS was 11.4. Seventeen patients (22.3 %) had ISS's > 15. The average GCS score was 15 for helmeted riders, while the unhelmeted group averaged 13. Six patients (8.3%) presented with a GCS of 3. The most common injuries were superficial followed by orthopedic and head injuries. Of the four patients wearing a helmet, two did receive mild head injuries. Forty-five percent (34 patients) of the study population sustained some degree of head injury. Three patients died and six were unable to return independently to activities of daily living. The hospital LOS for helmeted riders was (2.3 days), versus the stay for unhelmeted riders (3.9 days). The cost of treatment for unhelmeted individuals nearly doubled. The average hospital stay for the helmeted rider was $9,913 in comparison to $18,170 for the unhelmeted counterpart. Conclusion: In our sample, the majority of patients did not wear a helmet while riding ATVs. Non-helmeted riders account for an increase in severity of injuries, LOS, and hospital costs. Inclusion of ATV safety to school aged children, as well as awareness programs focused on racing, hunting, and farm safety will pose an additional challenge as emergency nurses continue to educate the community. [Research Presentation]
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Emergency Nurses Association

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAwareness and Prevention of All Terrain Vehicle Injuriesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/162866-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Awareness and Prevention of All Terrain Vehicle Injuries</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Emergency Nurses Association</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Glaser, Monta Rae, RN, CEN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">St. John's Regional Health Center</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">1235 E. Cherokee Street, Springfield, MO, 65804, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">(417) 885-3165</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">mglaser@sprg.smhs.com</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Cindy Lowe and Roger Huckfeldt, MD, FACS</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: While the number of all terrain vehicles (ATV) used for recreation and farming increases, little research and education is targeted toward associated injury awareness. The purpose of the study was to examine ATV related trauma admissions, assess common injuries, and compare injury severity for those wearing a helmet versus the unhelmeted. Design/Setting: A two year (2001-2002) retrospective study was conducted in a level 1 trauma center which admits more than 1500 trauma patients per year. Methodology: Analyses of 76 pediatric and adult patients was obtained from trauma registry data and individual medical records. Patients included in this study had significant injuries, which required a hospital admission of 24 hours or greater. The data included: age, Injury Severity Score (ISS), Glascow Coma Score (GCS), length of stay (LOS), helmet usage, type of injury, and hospital cost. Data was summarized with descriptive statistics using SPSS 10.0 for Windows. Results: Seventy-six patients between the ages 3 and 89 presented during the study period with an average age of 31. Only 5% of the patients were wearing a helmet. The mean ISS was 11.4. Seventeen patients (22.3 %) had ISS's &gt; 15. The average GCS score was 15 for helmeted riders, while the unhelmeted group averaged 13. Six patients (8.3%) presented with a GCS of 3. The most common injuries were superficial followed by orthopedic and head injuries. Of the four patients wearing a helmet, two did receive mild head injuries. Forty-five percent (34 patients) of the study population sustained some degree of head injury. Three patients died and six were unable to return independently to activities of daily living. The hospital LOS for helmeted riders was (2.3 days), versus the stay for unhelmeted riders (3.9 days). The cost of treatment for unhelmeted individuals nearly doubled. The average hospital stay for the helmeted rider was $9,913 in comparison to $18,170 for the unhelmeted counterpart. Conclusion: In our sample, the majority of patients did not wear a helmet while riding ATVs. Non-helmeted riders account for an increase in severity of injuries, LOS, and hospital costs. Inclusion of ATV safety to school aged children, as well as awareness programs focused on racing, hunting, and farm safety will pose an additional challenge as emergency nurses continue to educate the community. [Research Presentation]</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T10:35:29Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T10:35:29Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
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