2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/162867
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Reducing Hemolysis by Changing Nursing Clinical Practice
Abstract:
Reducing Hemolysis by Changing Nursing Clinical Practice
Conference Sponsor:Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Year:2003
Author:Grant, Marian S., BSN, RN
P.I. Institution Name:John Hopkins Hospital Adult ED
Contact Address:, Baltimore, MD, USA
Contact Telephone:410/526-9046
Clinical topic: The intent of this project was to reduce emergency department laboratory sample hemolysis. Hemolysis, damage to red blood cells, can be a complication of drawing blood. When hemolysis is significant, results are cancelled and another sample must be drawn. This delays results, affects patient care, and adds to the staff workload. A research study done in our ED showed that 13% of our laboratory samples were canceled due to hemolysis. This research also showed that hemolysis was significantly reduced by drawing blood through straight needles instead of intravenous catheters. If blood was drawn through intravenous catheters, hemolysis was also significantly lower when a syringe was used instead of a Vacutainer/tube combination. Implementation: These findings were shared with ED staff at in-service presentations and via notices in staff mail and the staff lounge. Subsequent new employees received flyers in their orientation packets. Individual staff members were also reminded of the recommended change whenever hemolysis occurred. Outcomes: An audit completed one month after the study results were presented showed a hemolysis cancellation rate of 4%. Subsequent audits for the next 15 months showed the cancellation rate averaging 4.8%. This 63% reduction in cancellation rate compared with the initial cancellation rate suggests that implementation of the clinical practice change is effective in reducing hemolysis. Recommendations: Hemolysis can be reduced through education and monitoring clinical practice. Given staff turnover, however, there is a challenge to maintain the recommended practice change, but our results show this is possible with ongoing staff education efforts. [Clinical Poster]
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Emergency Nurses Association

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleReducing Hemolysis by Changing Nursing Clinical Practiceen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/162867-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Reducing Hemolysis by Changing Nursing Clinical Practice</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Emergency Nurses Association</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Grant, Marian S., BSN, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">John Hopkins Hospital Adult ED</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">, Baltimore, MD, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">410/526-9046</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">msgrant@comcast.net</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Clinical topic: The intent of this project was to reduce emergency department laboratory sample hemolysis. Hemolysis, damage to red blood cells, can be a complication of drawing blood. When hemolysis is significant, results are cancelled and another sample must be drawn. This delays results, affects patient care, and adds to the staff workload. A research study done in our ED showed that 13% of our laboratory samples were canceled due to hemolysis. This research also showed that hemolysis was significantly reduced by drawing blood through straight needles instead of intravenous catheters. If blood was drawn through intravenous catheters, hemolysis was also significantly lower when a syringe was used instead of a Vacutainer/tube combination. Implementation: These findings were shared with ED staff at in-service presentations and via notices in staff mail and the staff lounge. Subsequent new employees received flyers in their orientation packets. Individual staff members were also reminded of the recommended change whenever hemolysis occurred. Outcomes: An audit completed one month after the study results were presented showed a hemolysis cancellation rate of 4%. Subsequent audits for the next 15 months showed the cancellation rate averaging 4.8%. This 63% reduction in cancellation rate compared with the initial cancellation rate suggests that implementation of the clinical practice change is effective in reducing hemolysis. Recommendations: Hemolysis can be reduced through education and monitoring clinical practice. Given staff turnover, however, there is a challenge to maintain the recommended practice change, but our results show this is possible with ongoing staff education efforts. [Clinical Poster]</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T10:35:30Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T10:35:30Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
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