2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/162878
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Awareness and Prevention of Large Animal Injuries
Abstract:
Awareness and Prevention of Large Animal Injuries
Conference Sponsor:Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Year:2003
Author:Murphy, Jayna, RN, BSN
P.I. Institution Name:St. John's Regional Health Center
Contact Address:1235 E. Cherokee, Springfield, MO, 65804, USA
Contact Telephone:417/885-6674
Co-Authors:Cindy Lowe and Roger Huckfeldt, MD, FACS
Purpose: Large animal-related accidents cause numerous deaths, costly disabilities, and serious injuries each year. Efforts of emergency nurses to increase awareness of the potential dangers incurred by large animals will in turn decrease the number of acute injuries treated at trauma centers. The purposes of this study was to 1) determine common types of injuries incurred by patients, 2) and demonstrate the severity of injuries caused by large animals. Design/Setting: A descriptive study of trauma victims admitted to a rural Level I trauma center from December 2001 to December 2002. Methods: A retrospective chart review analyses of 64 pediatric and adult patients from trauma registry data and individual medical records. All patients admitted 24 hours or greater, treated for animal injuries were eligible for inclusion in the study. Analysis of animal mishaps was categorized into one of the following types of injuries: fall/thrown, crush, kick, or attack. Data included: age, Injury Severity Score (ISS), Glasgow Coma Score (GCS), length of stay (LOS), type of animal, mechanism of injury, type of injury, and hospital cost. Results were analyzed with SPSS 10.0 for Windows software. Results: Sixty-four patients, males predominated (61%), between the ages 4 and 80 presented during the study period with an average age of 45. Forty-eight patients (75%) were injured by horses, 11 patients (17%) by bulls, 4 patients (6%) by cows, and 1 patient (2%) by a goat. The most frequent specific mechanisms of injury were falls/thrown (61%) followed by crushing (19%) kicks (14%), and attacks (6%). Mean ISS was 9.8 +/- 7.0 (range, 1 to 75). During this same period, the average ISS for all admissions at our trauma center was 11.5. The average GCS for animal injuries was 14.5; the average GCS for admissions at our trauma center was 13.5. Average hospital LOS 3.5 days for animal injuries while average LOS for all trauma admissions was 5.6 days. Forty-five percent of the patients sustained orthopedic injuries, and 36% sustained documented head injuries. One patient died, and 7 patients were unable to return independently to activities of daily living. Total hospitalization cost for these sixty-four patients totaled $867,861, with a mean cost of $13,560. Conclusion: Large animal related accidents result in significant injuries. Our study findings demonstrate that animal injuries are comparable in severity to admissions at our trauma center, therefore attention toward preventing these types of injuries is warranted. Further studies coupled with safety programs initiated by emergency nurses will increase awareness and educate the public regarding the seriousness of injuries incurred when dealing with large animals. [Research Presentation]
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Emergency Nurses Association

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAwareness and Prevention of Large Animal Injuriesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/162878-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Awareness and Prevention of Large Animal Injuries</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Emergency Nurses Association</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Murphy, Jayna, RN, BSN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">St. John's Regional Health Center</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">1235 E. Cherokee, Springfield, MO, 65804, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">417/885-6674</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jmurphy@sprg.smhs.com</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Cindy Lowe and Roger Huckfeldt, MD, FACS</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: Large animal-related accidents cause numerous deaths, costly disabilities, and serious injuries each year. Efforts of emergency nurses to increase awareness of the potential dangers incurred by large animals will in turn decrease the number of acute injuries treated at trauma centers. The purposes of this study was to 1) determine common types of injuries incurred by patients, 2) and demonstrate the severity of injuries caused by large animals. Design/Setting: A descriptive study of trauma victims admitted to a rural Level I trauma center from December 2001 to December 2002. Methods: A retrospective chart review analyses of 64 pediatric and adult patients from trauma registry data and individual medical records. All patients admitted 24 hours or greater, treated for animal injuries were eligible for inclusion in the study. Analysis of animal mishaps was categorized into one of the following types of injuries: fall/thrown, crush, kick, or attack. Data included: age, Injury Severity Score (ISS), Glasgow Coma Score (GCS), length of stay (LOS), type of animal, mechanism of injury, type of injury, and hospital cost. Results were analyzed with SPSS 10.0 for Windows software. Results: Sixty-four patients, males predominated (61%), between the ages 4 and 80 presented during the study period with an average age of 45. Forty-eight patients (75%) were injured by horses, 11 patients (17%) by bulls, 4 patients (6%) by cows, and 1 patient (2%) by a goat. The most frequent specific mechanisms of injury were falls/thrown (61%) followed by crushing (19%) kicks (14%), and attacks (6%). Mean ISS was 9.8 +/- 7.0 (range, 1 to 75). During this same period, the average ISS for all admissions at our trauma center was 11.5. The average GCS for animal injuries was 14.5; the average GCS for admissions at our trauma center was 13.5. Average hospital LOS 3.5 days for animal injuries while average LOS for all trauma admissions was 5.6 days. Forty-five percent of the patients sustained orthopedic injuries, and 36% sustained documented head injuries. One patient died, and 7 patients were unable to return independently to activities of daily living. Total hospitalization cost for these sixty-four patients totaled $867,861, with a mean cost of $13,560. Conclusion: Large animal related accidents result in significant injuries. Our study findings demonstrate that animal injuries are comparable in severity to admissions at our trauma center, therefore attention toward preventing these types of injuries is warranted. Further studies coupled with safety programs initiated by emergency nurses will increase awareness and educate the public regarding the seriousness of injuries incurred when dealing with large animals. [Research Presentation]</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T10:35:41Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T10:35:41Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
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