2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/162884
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Preparedness to Care for Patients of Chemical and Biological Warfare Agents
Abstract:
Preparedness to Care for Patients of Chemical and Biological Warfare Agents
Conference Sponsor:Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Year:2003
Author:Schmidt, Christopher, LCDR, NS, USN, RN-CS, MSN, EMP, CEN, CP
P.I. Institution Name:Naval Hospital Jacksonville
Contact Address:Emergency Dept., 2080 Child Street, Jacksonville, FL, 32214, USA
Contact Telephone:904/542-7350
Co-Authors:LT Joseph Anthony Marcantel, NC, USN, RN, BSN, CEN; LCDR Barbara J. Kincade, NC, USN, RN, MSN; and CAPT Robin McKenzie NC USN, PhD, RN-CS
Purpose: Increased threat of chemical and biological (C&B) agent injuries from terrorist activity has greatly escalated public concern. This study assessed need for training by determining level of preparedness through self-perception of clinical competence, level of education, and experience of military emergency department (ED) healthcare providers to identify and treat victims of C&B agents. It sought to determine a correlation between demonstrated test score of WMD knowledge, and perceived level of preparedness. Finally, it polled participants to inquire if C&B education should be incorporated into academic curriculum and made a requirement for medical/nursing licensure. Design/Setting: Non-experimental descriptive comparative study conducted in 42-bed ED with 83,000 visits annually, in a military teaching hospital in Southeastern Virginia. Sample: Convenience sample of personnel drawn from 9 ED staff physicians (13%), 8 resident physicians (12%), 26 military (38%), and 11 civilian nurses (16%), and 14 Hospital Corpsmen (HMs) (21%). Methodology: During a departmental meeting, members were briefed of the study's purpose and asked to voluntarily participate. Data was collected using a demographic profile, attitude self-perception survey and Chemical Biological Warfare Casualty Questionnaire (CBWCQ). The CBWCQ, a 25-item examination, was derived from curriculum taught at Naval Environmental Health Command's Chemical Biological Radiological casualty course. The instrument was reviewed by subject matter experts at NEHC and the U.S. Army Research Institutes for Infectious Diseases and Chemical Agents, Fort Dietrick, MD for content and construct validity. Results: 140 surveys were distributed, 70 returned, and 68 were able to be utilized for analysis. Using descriptive statistics, seventy-six percent of the sample (n=52) identified exposure to C&B agent awareness training. Of both military and civilian RNs, 51.3% indicated lack of preparedness to identify and treat both C&B casualties. In contrast, 78% of physicians, 87% of residents and 35.2% of HMs indicated preparedness. Quiz scores for staff physician, resident, nurse and HM were 78%, 84%, 56%, and 52% correct respectively. Results using Pearson Product-Moment Correlations found a statistically significant correlation (r = 0.47; p=0.002) between only RN level of preparedness and test score. Overwhelmingly, most study participants indicated C&B education be incorporated into undergraduate and graduate curriculum, and become a continuing education requirement for medical or nursing licensure renewal. Conclusions: A majority of ED staff received some type of instruction, yet several participants still indicated being unprepared to identify and treat C&B agent victims. Physicians, especially resident physicians, scored markedly higher than nurses and HMs in correctly caring for C&B agent patients. Emphasis should be placed on periodic instruction using scenarios and hands-on experiences to increase proficiency in caring for victims of a C&B event otherwise information may be quickly forgotten. C&B instruction should be considered an academic component for medical and nursing school curriculum as well as a requirement for licensure. [Research Presentation]
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Emergency Nurses Association

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePreparedness to Care for Patients of Chemical and Biological Warfare Agentsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/162884-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Preparedness to Care for Patients of Chemical and Biological Warfare Agents</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Emergency Nurses Association</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Schmidt, Christopher, LCDR, NS, USN, RN-CS, MSN, EMP, CEN, CP</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Naval Hospital Jacksonville</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Emergency Dept., 2080 Child Street, Jacksonville, FL, 32214, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">904/542-7350</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">c_e_schmidt@sar.med.navy.mil</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">LT Joseph Anthony Marcantel, NC, USN, RN, BSN, CEN; LCDR Barbara J. Kincade, NC, USN, RN, MSN; and CAPT Robin McKenzie NC USN, PhD, RN-CS</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: Increased threat of chemical and biological (C&amp;B) agent injuries from terrorist activity has greatly escalated public concern. This study assessed need for training by determining level of preparedness through self-perception of clinical competence, level of education, and experience of military emergency department (ED) healthcare providers to identify and treat victims of C&amp;B agents. It sought to determine a correlation between demonstrated test score of WMD knowledge, and perceived level of preparedness. Finally, it polled participants to inquire if C&amp;B education should be incorporated into academic curriculum and made a requirement for medical/nursing licensure. Design/Setting: Non-experimental descriptive comparative study conducted in 42-bed ED with 83,000 visits annually, in a military teaching hospital in Southeastern Virginia. Sample: Convenience sample of personnel drawn from 9 ED staff physicians (13%), 8 resident physicians (12%), 26 military (38%), and 11 civilian nurses (16%), and 14 Hospital Corpsmen (HMs) (21%). Methodology: During a departmental meeting, members were briefed of the study's purpose and asked to voluntarily participate. Data was collected using a demographic profile, attitude self-perception survey and Chemical Biological Warfare Casualty Questionnaire (CBWCQ). The CBWCQ, a 25-item examination, was derived from curriculum taught at Naval Environmental Health Command's Chemical Biological Radiological casualty course. The instrument was reviewed by subject matter experts at NEHC and the U.S. Army Research Institutes for Infectious Diseases and Chemical Agents, Fort Dietrick, MD for content and construct validity. Results: 140 surveys were distributed, 70 returned, and 68 were able to be utilized for analysis. Using descriptive statistics, seventy-six percent of the sample (n=52) identified exposure to C&amp;B agent awareness training. Of both military and civilian RNs, 51.3% indicated lack of preparedness to identify and treat both C&amp;B casualties. In contrast, 78% of physicians, 87% of residents and 35.2% of HMs indicated preparedness. Quiz scores for staff physician, resident, nurse and HM were 78%, 84%, 56%, and 52% correct respectively. Results using Pearson Product-Moment Correlations found a statistically significant correlation (r = 0.47; p=0.002) between only RN level of preparedness and test score. Overwhelmingly, most study participants indicated C&amp;B education be incorporated into undergraduate and graduate curriculum, and become a continuing education requirement for medical or nursing licensure renewal. Conclusions: A majority of ED staff received some type of instruction, yet several participants still indicated being unprepared to identify and treat C&amp;B agent victims. Physicians, especially resident physicians, scored markedly higher than nurses and HMs in correctly caring for C&amp;B agent patients. Emphasis should be placed on periodic instruction using scenarios and hands-on experiences to increase proficiency in caring for victims of a C&amp;B event otherwise information may be quickly forgotten. C&amp;B instruction should be considered an academic component for medical and nursing school curriculum as well as a requirement for licensure. [Research Presentation]</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T10:35:48Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T10:35:48Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
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