2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/162888
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Managing Incidents of Diversion
Abstract:
Managing Incidents of Diversion
Conference Sponsor:Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Year:2003
Author:Strickler, Jeffery, RN, MA, CEN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Kansas Medical Center
Contact Address:3901 Rainbow Boulevard, Kansas City, KS, 66106, USA
Contact Telephone:913/588-5428
Co-Authors:Jan Miller, RN, BSN
Clinical Topic: The intent of this clinical project was to develop effective strategies for managing incidents of trauma diversion and emergency department closure. This project was motivated by the need to effectively manage the increasing number of hours on diversion seen at KUMed (hospital for University of Kansas Medical Center). KUMed saw a three fold increase in the number of diversion hours due to area hospital closures and an increase in other facilities being on diversion. It was recognized that KUMed's process was ineffective to assist with this new set of circumstances. Implementation: A multidisciplinary subcommittee of our Trauma Performance Improvement committee met to discuss options. This subcommittee consisted of personnel from both the Trauma Service and Emergency Department. The Medical Directors and Nurse Managers of each respective service collaborated on the initial development of the policy. Revisions and final approval were by the Multi-Disciplinary Trauma Performance Improvement Committee which consists of both physician and nursing leadership from areas involved in the care of the trauma patient. Our diversion policy was revised and a step-wise procedure was developed to promote accountability and communication. A tracking tool and a method for providing quality assurance were developed. A supplemental staffing plan for census increases was developed to support this plan. Outcome: These strategies allowed our institution to reduce an increasing number of hours on diversion to a much lower monthly average. As previously mentioned, KUMed had experienced a three fold increase in hours on diversion or closure. After implementation of these strategies, KUMed has maintained an average diversion level of less than 3% of total available hours. Unfortunately the majority of these hours were due to equipment failure of CT scan or diversion hours would have been lower. Recommendations: Develop reasonable triggers for diversion based upon emergency department capacity and capability rather than overall hospital conditions Develop policy and procedures that provide for communication and accountability Develop mechanisms for short term staffing accommodation Provide for continual performance improvement Given the increased incident of diversion around the country, these strategies may prove effective for other institutions. [Clinical Poster]
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Emergency Nurses Association

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleManaging Incidents of Diversionen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/162888-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Managing Incidents of Diversion</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Emergency Nurses Association</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Strickler, Jeffery, RN, MA, CEN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Kansas Medical Center</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">3901 Rainbow Boulevard, Kansas City, KS, 66106, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">913/588-5428</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">tishstrickler@hotmail.com</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Jan Miller, RN, BSN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Clinical Topic: The intent of this clinical project was to develop effective strategies for managing incidents of trauma diversion and emergency department closure. This project was motivated by the need to effectively manage the increasing number of hours on diversion seen at KUMed (hospital for University of Kansas Medical Center). KUMed saw a three fold increase in the number of diversion hours due to area hospital closures and an increase in other facilities being on diversion. It was recognized that KUMed's process was ineffective to assist with this new set of circumstances. Implementation: A multidisciplinary subcommittee of our Trauma Performance Improvement committee met to discuss options. This subcommittee consisted of personnel from both the Trauma Service and Emergency Department. The Medical Directors and Nurse Managers of each respective service collaborated on the initial development of the policy. Revisions and final approval were by the Multi-Disciplinary Trauma Performance Improvement Committee which consists of both physician and nursing leadership from areas involved in the care of the trauma patient. Our diversion policy was revised and a step-wise procedure was developed to promote accountability and communication. A tracking tool and a method for providing quality assurance were developed. A supplemental staffing plan for census increases was developed to support this plan. Outcome: These strategies allowed our institution to reduce an increasing number of hours on diversion to a much lower monthly average. As previously mentioned, KUMed had experienced a three fold increase in hours on diversion or closure. After implementation of these strategies, KUMed has maintained an average diversion level of less than 3% of total available hours. Unfortunately the majority of these hours were due to equipment failure of CT scan or diversion hours would have been lower. Recommendations: Develop reasonable triggers for diversion based upon emergency department capacity and capability rather than overall hospital conditions Develop policy and procedures that provide for communication and accountability Develop mechanisms for short term staffing accommodation Provide for continual performance improvement Given the increased incident of diversion around the country, these strategies may prove effective for other institutions. [Clinical Poster]</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T10:35:52Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T10:35:52Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
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