2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/162896
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Tools to Decrease Violent Incidents in the ED
Abstract:
Tools to Decrease Violent Incidents in the ED
Conference Sponsor:Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Year:2006
Author:Bell, Kathy, RN, BSN, CEN
P.I. Institution Name:Presbyterian Kaseman Hospital
Title:Education Resource Coordinator
Contact Address:8300 Constitution Ave., NE, Albuquerque, NM, 87110, USA
Contact Telephone:(505) 291-2161
Co-Authors:Susan Smuda, RN, BSN, CEN
Clinical Topic: Emergency department (ED) violence has long been identified as a problem. Two years ago, a large private hospital in the Southwest enlarged the emergency department from a 14 to a 30-bed unit. This expansion brought a 12% increase in census in two years; and consequently allowed for a greater frequency of violent behavior from patients. It was clear that staff needed additional tools to intervene effectively. Tools needed to be able to empower staff, reduce the staff?s victim mentality, and decrease violent incidents while maintaining safety of staff, patients, and visitors. The goal of this project was to institute an educational program so that ED staff would be able to provide a safe environment for patients, visitors, and other staff while increasing employee effectiveness when dealing with difficult patients. Implementation: The hospital and ED staff development (education) team educated ED nursing, medical, and security staff (n = 156) on the use of verbal judo to help de-escalate potentially violent or violent situations. The original verbal judo program (developed by Dr. G.J. Thompson) was adapted into an educational program to fit the needs of the ED staff. Team takedown techniques (adapted from the Crisis Management program) and restraint techniques were also taught. Clinical staff received additional education from staff psychiatrists regarding medications available to help de-escalate patients. The 2005-2006 timeline for the program was as follows. In September of 2005 two planning team meetings were held. By October the program was approved for implementation. Verbal judo training sessions were held one month later with team takedown sessions taught in January and February of 2006. During March and April of 2006, workplace violence reports were reviewed. Outcomes: 98% of the nursing, 12% of the medical, and 1% of the security staff attended training sessions. Nursing staff, who did not attend sessions and witnessed success of the 5-man takedown technique, sought training from fellow staff members. Staff became more conscious of reporting possible violent events. Injuries during a takedown have decreased since instituting the program. Recommendations: Evaluation proved that when the educational tools were utilized, they provided a safer environment for staff and patients. Staff are more confident having tools to deal with violent individuals rather than relying on gut instinct. In May, the decision was made to train all ED and security staff in the three hospitals in system beginning in June 2006. Challenges were numerous. Getting staff to training sessions was difficult. A change in the community, which decreased resources for some highly volatile patients, has increased patient load. The emergency department has experienced increased stays as, frequently; there is nowhere to send these patients. To keep staff focused on utilizing verbal judo and crisis management techniques, unannounced drills and providing yearly updates are being planned.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Emergency Nurses Association

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleTools to Decrease Violent Incidents in the EDen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/162896-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Tools to Decrease Violent Incidents in the ED</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Emergency Nurses Association</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Bell, Kathy, RN, BSN, CEN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Presbyterian Kaseman Hospital</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Education Resource Coordinator</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">8300 Constitution Ave., NE, Albuquerque, NM, 87110, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">(505) 291-2161</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">kbell@phs.org</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Susan Smuda, RN, BSN, CEN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Clinical Topic: Emergency department (ED) violence has long been identified as a problem. Two years ago, a large private hospital in the Southwest enlarged the emergency department from a 14 to a 30-bed unit. This expansion brought a 12% increase in census in two years; and consequently allowed for a greater frequency of violent behavior from patients. It was clear that staff needed additional tools to intervene effectively. Tools needed to be able to empower staff, reduce the staff?s victim mentality, and decrease violent incidents while maintaining safety of staff, patients, and visitors. The goal of this project was to institute an educational program so that ED staff would be able to provide a safe environment for patients, visitors, and other staff while increasing employee effectiveness when dealing with difficult patients. Implementation: The hospital and ED staff development (education) team educated ED nursing, medical, and security staff (n = 156) on the use of verbal judo to help de-escalate potentially violent or violent situations. The original verbal judo program (developed by Dr. G.J. Thompson) was adapted into an educational program to fit the needs of the ED staff. Team takedown techniques (adapted from the Crisis Management program) and restraint techniques were also taught. Clinical staff received additional education from staff psychiatrists regarding medications available to help de-escalate patients. The 2005-2006 timeline for the program was as follows. In September of 2005 two planning team meetings were held. By October the program was approved for implementation. Verbal judo training sessions were held one month later with team takedown sessions taught in January and February of 2006. During March and April of 2006, workplace violence reports were reviewed. Outcomes: 98% of the nursing, 12% of the medical, and 1% of the security staff attended training sessions. Nursing staff, who did not attend sessions and witnessed success of the 5-man takedown technique, sought training from fellow staff members. Staff became more conscious of reporting possible violent events. Injuries during a takedown have decreased since instituting the program. Recommendations: Evaluation proved that when the educational tools were utilized, they provided a safer environment for staff and patients. Staff are more confident having tools to deal with violent individuals rather than relying on gut instinct. In May, the decision was made to train all ED and security staff in the three hospitals in system beginning in June 2006. Challenges were numerous. Getting staff to training sessions was difficult. A change in the community, which decreased resources for some highly volatile patients, has increased patient load. The emergency department has experienced increased stays as, frequently; there is nowhere to send these patients. To keep staff focused on utilizing verbal judo and crisis management techniques, unannounced drills and providing yearly updates are being planned.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T10:36:00Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T10:36:00Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
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