2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/162900
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Check Your Heart at the Door
Abstract:
Check Your Heart at the Door
Conference Sponsor:Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Year:2006
Author:Flanagan, Margaret, RN, MSN, FNP, MICN
P.I. Institution Name:Hoag Memorial Hospital Presbyterian
Title:Clinical Nurse II, Emergency Department
Contact Address:One Hoag Dr., Newport Beach, CA, 92658, USA
Contact Telephone:(949) 764-5926
Purpose: Patients presenting to the emergency department (ED) may not have the classic signs and symptoms of a myocardial infarction (MI) but may in fact be experiencing one. With potentially extended wait times prior to physician evaluation, it is critical for the triage nurse to identify patients that have potential emergent cardiac conditions so they may be treated in a timely manner. The purpose of this study was to determine if performing EKGs on patients with anginal equivalents and waiting in the ED lobby would provide early identification of acute MIs and therefore prevent delays in treatment. Design/Setting: A retrospective quantitative study was undertaken at a 32-bed ED in Southern California. When all beds are full, patients with anginal equivalents or atypical chest pain are taken to a designated room outside the treatment area to perform an EKG. The EKG is reviewed by a physician and a decision is made to either have the patient remain in the lobby or be taken to the treatment area.
Sample: The sample consisted of 54 patients without classic MI symptoms but exhibiting anginal equivalents who presented to the ED from July 1 through September 20, 2005. Methodology: A front line emergency nurse audited the records of the sample population provided by an Advance Practice Nurse from the cardiology department. The results were verified by the ED director. Results: Based on the EKGs from the patients awaiting care in the ED lobby, 8 of the 54 were identified with an acute MI. This early detection process, implemented in February 2005, resulted in improved patient outcomes for patients whose treatment would have otherwise been delayed due to atypical symptoms related to such other risk factors as diabetes, hypertension, age, and gender. Conclusions: Emergent patients with cardiac conditions but atypical symptoms may experience extended wait times before receiving treatment in the ED. Early identification and subsequent treatment may result in improved patient outcomes and should be explored. [Research Presentation]
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Emergency Nurses Association

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCheck Your Heart at the Dooren_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/162900-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Check Your Heart at the Door</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Emergency Nurses Association</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Flanagan, Margaret, RN, MSN, FNP, MICN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Hoag Memorial Hospital Presbyterian</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Clinical Nurse II, Emergency Department</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">One Hoag Dr., Newport Beach, CA, 92658, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">(949) 764-5926</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">mflanagan@hoaghospital.org</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: Patients presenting to the emergency department (ED) may not have the classic signs and symptoms of a myocardial infarction (MI) but may in fact be experiencing one. With potentially extended wait times prior to physician evaluation, it is critical for the triage nurse to identify patients that have potential emergent cardiac conditions so they may be treated in a timely manner. The purpose of this study was to determine if performing EKGs on patients with anginal equivalents and waiting in the ED lobby would provide early identification of acute MIs and therefore prevent delays in treatment. Design/Setting: A retrospective quantitative study was undertaken at a 32-bed ED in Southern California. When all beds are full, patients with anginal equivalents or atypical chest pain are taken to a designated room outside the treatment area to perform an EKG. The EKG is reviewed by a physician and a decision is made to either have the patient remain in the lobby or be taken to the treatment area. <br/>Sample: The sample consisted of 54 patients without classic MI symptoms but exhibiting anginal equivalents who presented to the ED from July 1 through September 20, 2005. Methodology: A front line emergency nurse audited the records of the sample population provided by an Advance Practice Nurse from the cardiology department. The results were verified by the ED director. Results: Based on the EKGs from the patients awaiting care in the ED lobby, 8 of the 54 were identified with an acute MI. This early detection process, implemented in February 2005, resulted in improved patient outcomes for patients whose treatment would have otherwise been delayed due to atypical symptoms related to such other risk factors as diabetes, hypertension, age, and gender. Conclusions: Emergent patients with cardiac conditions but atypical symptoms may experience extended wait times before receiving treatment in the ED. Early identification and subsequent treatment may result in improved patient outcomes and should be explored. [Research Presentation]</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T10:36:04Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T10:36:04Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
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