Emergency Nurses' Perceptions of Obstacles and Supportive Behaviors in End-of-Life Care

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/162906
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Emergency Nurses' Perceptions of Obstacles and Supportive Behaviors in End-of-Life Care
Abstract:
Emergency Nurses' Perceptions of Obstacles and Supportive Behaviors in
End-of-Life Care
Conference Sponsor:Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Year:2006
Author:Heaston, Sondra, RN, MS, NP-C, CEN
P.I. Institution Name:Brigham Young University
Title:Assistant Teaching Professor / Family Nurse Practitioner
Contact Address:1481 North 1450 East, Provo, UT, 84604, USA
Contact Telephone:(801) 422-1210
Co-Authors:Renea Beckstrand, RN, PhD, CEN; A. Elaine Bond, DNSc, APRN, CCRN; Sheri P. Palmer, RN, MSN
Purpose: According to the National Center for Health Statistics, in 2002 it was estimated that 272,000 patients were either dead-on-arrival or died in emergency departments in the United States. Since little is known about the subject, the purpose of this study was to determine emergency nurses' perceptions of obstacles and supportive behaviors in providing end-of life care to dying patients in emergency departments. Design: This was a cross-sectional, quantitative design. Setting/Sample: After Institutional Review Board approval, a geographically dispersed, national random sample of 300 members of the Emergency Nurses Association was obtained. Inclusion criteria included: emergency nurses who had worked at least part-time, lived in the United States, were able to read English, and had cared for at least one patient who was at the end of life.
Methodology: Two research questions were addressed in this pilot study: what are the largest obstacles to providing end-of-life care as perceived by emergency nurses, and what are the most supportive behaviors in providing end-of-life care as perceived by emergency nurses. The random sample was mailed an adapted questionnaire entitled The Survey of Emergency Nurses Perceptions of End-of-Life Care. Returns after three mailings yielded 169 usable responses from 284 eligible respondents (59.5%). Results: Using a Likert-type scale of 0 (not an obstacle) to 5 (extremely large obstacle), mean obstacle scores ranged from 3.80 down to 1.63. Cronbach's alpha for the 31 obstacle items was .94. The three highest scoring obstacles were: the nurse having too high of a workload (M = 3.80, SD 1.20), the nurse having to deal with angry family members (M = 3.71, SD = 1.25), and poor design of emergency departments which do not allow for privacy of dying patients or grieving family members (M = 3.57, SD = 1.44). On a Likert-type scale of 0 (not a support) to 5 (extremely large support), the mean supportive behavior item scores ranged from 4.57 down to 3.29. Cronbach's alpha for the 23 support items was .87. The highest scoring supportive behaviors were: good communication between the physician and RN caring for the dying patient (M = 4.57, SD = 0.64), having the physician meet in person with the family after the patient's death to offer support and validate that all possible care was done (M = 4.55, SD = 0.65), and an emergency department designed so that the family has a place to go to grieve in private (M= 4.51, SD = 0.78). Conclusions: The identification of both obstacles and supportive behaviors in providing end-of-life care in the emergency department may yield important information to help the emergency nurse effectively care for dying patients and their families. Further research is needed and is currently being completed, using an updated questionnaire based on these results. [Research Presentation]
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Emergency Nurses Association

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEmergency Nurses' Perceptions of Obstacles and Supportive Behaviors in End-of-Life Careen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/162906-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Emergency Nurses' Perceptions of Obstacles and Supportive Behaviors in <br/> End-of-Life Care</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Emergency Nurses Association</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Heaston, Sondra, RN, MS, NP-C, CEN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Brigham Young University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Teaching Professor / Family Nurse Practitioner</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">1481 North 1450 East, Provo, UT, 84604, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">(801) 422-1210</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">ssheaston@msn.com</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Renea Beckstrand, RN, PhD, CEN; A. Elaine Bond, DNSc, APRN, CCRN; Sheri P. Palmer, RN, MSN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: According to the National Center for Health Statistics, in 2002 it was estimated that 272,000 patients were either dead-on-arrival or died in emergency departments in the United States. Since little is known about the subject, the purpose of this study was to determine emergency nurses' perceptions of obstacles and supportive behaviors in providing end-of life care to dying patients in emergency departments. Design: This was a cross-sectional, quantitative design. Setting/Sample: After Institutional Review Board approval, a geographically dispersed, national random sample of 300 members of the Emergency Nurses Association was obtained. Inclusion criteria included: emergency nurses who had worked at least part-time, lived in the United States, were able to read English, and had cared for at least one patient who was at the end of life. <br/>Methodology: Two research questions were addressed in this pilot study: what are the largest obstacles to providing end-of-life care as perceived by emergency nurses, and what are the most supportive behaviors in providing end-of-life care as perceived by emergency nurses. The random sample was mailed an adapted questionnaire entitled The Survey of Emergency Nurses Perceptions of End-of-Life Care. Returns after three mailings yielded 169 usable responses from 284 eligible respondents (59.5%). Results: Using a Likert-type scale of 0 (not an obstacle) to 5 (extremely large obstacle), mean obstacle scores ranged from 3.80 down to 1.63. Cronbach's alpha for the 31 obstacle items was .94. The three highest scoring obstacles were: the nurse having too high of a workload (M = 3.80, SD 1.20), the nurse having to deal with angry family members (M = 3.71, SD = 1.25), and poor design of emergency departments which do not allow for privacy of dying patients or grieving family members (M = 3.57, SD = 1.44). On a Likert-type scale of 0 (not a support) to 5 (extremely large support), the mean supportive behavior item scores ranged from 4.57 down to 3.29. Cronbach's alpha for the 23 support items was .87. The highest scoring supportive behaviors were: good communication between the physician and RN caring for the dying patient (M = 4.57, SD = 0.64), having the physician meet in person with the family after the patient's death to offer support and validate that all possible care was done (M = 4.55, SD = 0.65), and an emergency department designed so that the family has a place to go to grieve in private (M= 4.51, SD = 0.78). Conclusions: The identification of both obstacles and supportive behaviors in providing end-of-life care in the emergency department may yield important information to help the emergency nurse effectively care for dying patients and their families. Further research is needed and is currently being completed, using an updated questionnaire based on these results. [Research Presentation]</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T10:36:11Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T10:36:11Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
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