2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/162907
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Ambulatory Infusion Clinic and Emergency Services: Model for the Future
Abstract:
Ambulatory Infusion Clinic and Emergency Services: Model for the Future
Conference Sponsor:Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Year:2006
Author:Hodge, Angela, RN, BSN, SANE, CEN, EMT-P
P.I. Institution Name:Southern Ohio Medical Center
Title:Assistant Nurse Manager
Contact Address:1805 27th Street, Portsmouth, OH, 45662, USA
Contact Telephone:(740) 356-8723
Co-Authors:Angela Hodge, RN, BSN, CEN, EMT-P
Clinical Topic: This rural 200-bed acute care facility provides care for a 7-county service area with 76,000 emergency visits annually. After the merger of two local hospitals, the decision was made to have a 24-hour emergency department and a 16-hour off-site emergency department (ED). As other departments were merging, a small population of patients was displaced. They included patients in need of treatments that could not be billed as inpatient and nor were they eligible for home care [examples - injections and intravenous (IV) therapy]. Recognizing the simultaneous needs of this unique group of patients and maintaining job security, the decision was made to create an ambulatory infusion clinic (AIC). Implementation: The nursing staff at the off-site location took the lead in developing the AIC. Since there were only 30-40 patients per month that fell into this category, it was decided that the off-site emergency department would be able to absorb these patients. Nursing staff attended meetings, went on site visits, read best practices, and participated in decision making processes related to the AIC. AIC patients are seen predominately in the morning hours when the off-site emergency department census is lower. The multiple use of beds allows for efficiency in both emergency services and AIC operations. Physicians were notified of the changes through interdepartmental memos. A brochure describing AIC and the services provided was developed and distributed to all physicians who had privileges at this medical center. A presentation on the AIC was conducted during one of the medical staff's quarterly meetings to increase awareness of the program. Outcomes: Today, the AIC has grown and become a positive asset to our organization and community. Even with a decrease in the hours of operations at the off-site emergency department in 2004 to 13 hours a day, the census for both operations have continued to climb. The door-to-discharge time for the off-site emergency department has remained stable. The fiscal picture has brightened and overall staff satisfaction is at 97 percentile (Press Ganey 10/05). The staffing model did not change, jobs were secured, and staff was not displaced. Specifically, in fiscal year (FY) 2003, the AIC completed 1,609 treatments, the off-site ED saw 23,628 patients, and the door-to-discharge time was 1.3 hours. In FY 2004, AIC completed 2,356 treatments, the off-site ED saw 21,410, and door-to-discharge was 1.3 hours. In FY 2005, the AIC completed 2,349 treatments, the emergency department saw 22,529, and door-to-discharge time remained 1.3 hours. The AIC net patient revenue has increased by 90%. Recommendations: During mergers and downsizing of departments, communities and employees may be left feeling shortchanged and without options. By involving emergency nurses, an impact can be made on decisions that affect their departments, patients, and quality of work life. Looking for other opportunities (alternate sources of income) within the organization may increase staff satisfaction, community support, and financial stability.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Emergency Nurses Association

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAmbulatory Infusion Clinic and Emergency Services: Model for the Futureen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/162907-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Ambulatory Infusion Clinic and Emergency Services: Model for the Future</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Emergency Nurses Association</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Hodge, Angela, RN, BSN, SANE, CEN, EMT-P</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Southern Ohio Medical Center</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Nurse Manager</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">1805 27th Street, Portsmouth, OH, 45662, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">(740) 356-8723</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">hodgea@somc.org</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Angela Hodge, RN, BSN, CEN, EMT-P</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Clinical Topic: This rural 200-bed acute care facility provides care for a 7-county service area with 76,000 emergency visits annually. After the merger of two local hospitals, the decision was made to have a 24-hour emergency department and a 16-hour off-site emergency department (ED). As other departments were merging, a small population of patients was displaced. They included patients in need of treatments that could not be billed as inpatient and nor were they eligible for home care [examples - injections and intravenous (IV) therapy]. Recognizing the simultaneous needs of this unique group of patients and maintaining job security, the decision was made to create an ambulatory infusion clinic (AIC). Implementation: The nursing staff at the off-site location took the lead in developing the AIC. Since there were only 30-40 patients per month that fell into this category, it was decided that the off-site emergency department would be able to absorb these patients. Nursing staff attended meetings, went on site visits, read best practices, and participated in decision making processes related to the AIC. AIC patients are seen predominately in the morning hours when the off-site emergency department census is lower. The multiple use of beds allows for efficiency in both emergency services and AIC operations. Physicians were notified of the changes through interdepartmental memos. A brochure describing AIC and the services provided was developed and distributed to all physicians who had privileges at this medical center. A presentation on the AIC was conducted during one of the medical staff's quarterly meetings to increase awareness of the program. Outcomes: Today, the AIC has grown and become a positive asset to our organization and community. Even with a decrease in the hours of operations at the off-site emergency department in 2004 to 13 hours a day, the census for both operations have continued to climb. The door-to-discharge time for the off-site emergency department has remained stable. The fiscal picture has brightened and overall staff satisfaction is at 97 percentile (Press Ganey 10/05). The staffing model did not change, jobs were secured, and staff was not displaced. Specifically, in fiscal year (FY) 2003, the AIC completed 1,609 treatments, the off-site ED saw 23,628 patients, and the door-to-discharge time was 1.3 hours. In FY 2004, AIC completed 2,356 treatments, the off-site ED saw 21,410, and door-to-discharge was 1.3 hours. In FY 2005, the AIC completed 2,349 treatments, the emergency department saw 22,529, and door-to-discharge time remained 1.3 hours. The AIC net patient revenue has increased by 90%. Recommendations: During mergers and downsizing of departments, communities and employees may be left feeling shortchanged and without options. By involving emergency nurses, an impact can be made on decisions that affect their departments, patients, and quality of work life. Looking for other opportunities (alternate sources of income) within the organization may increase staff satisfaction, community support, and financial stability.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T10:36:13Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T10:36:13Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
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