2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/162908
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Preempting the Nursing Shortage: An ED Nurse Internship Program
Abstract:
Preempting the Nursing Shortage: An ED Nurse Internship Program
Conference Sponsor:Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Year:2006
Author:Humphrey, Margaret, RN, MSM
P.I. Institution Name:Christiana Care Health System - Wilmington Hospital
Title:Staff Development Specialist
Contact Address:501 West 14th Street, PO Box 1668, Wilmington, DE, 19899- 1668, USA
Contact Telephone:(302) 488-4818
Co-Authors:Margaret Pegge Humphrey, RN, MSM; Nicole McCarry, RN; Christina Monico, RN
Clinical Topic: The current nursing shortage threatens to undermine every branch of nursing. At particular risk is the fast paced, high-stress environment of the emergency room. In 2003, the ED at this two-hospital healthcare system, serving more than 145,000 ED patients annually, developed a nursing internship program to attract and orient new graduates or novice nurses who might otherwise fear beginning a career in a high-pressure specialty. The program's goals were to advance technical skills through formal and informal training and encourage personal growth through peer and preceptor relationships. Implementation: Candidates were recruited from job fairs and area nursing schools, and selection made based on interviews, letters of recommendation, and a commitment to work in our healthcare system's ED for a minimum of two years. New nurse graduate with at least a 3.2 GPA, or RN's with less than one year of experience, were eligible to apply. Interns received ample opportunities to demonstrate clinical competency in ED technical skills and procedures, apply critical thinking throughout the nursing process, and develop time management skills. The six month core curriculum included monthly or bi-monthly classes in such topics as dysrhythmia recognition, airway management, moderate sedation, domestic violence, hazardous material decontamination, critical care medication, organ procurement, and legal/ethical issues). Interns also attended certification training (ACLS, PALS, TNCC) taught by a range of hospital and specialty staff, including development educators, preceptors, physicians, respiratory therapists, MRI technicians, and others. Trainees also rotated through related departments (e.g., ICU, L & D, the cardiac cath lab), and received mentoring and coaching from educators, preceptors, and assistant nurse managers. Weekly meetings with ED education staff and working closely with preceptors gave interns valuable opportunities to discuss on-the-job concerns, feelings and experiences. Progress was evaluated using a check list tool (the Basic Knowledge Assessment Test), and through informal discussions with preceptors and educators. The sole program costs to the hospital were for formal certification classes (between $45 and $100 per class); informal classes taught by hospital employees cost only staff time. Outcomes: To date, we have graduated three classes of interns, or 44 well prepared and proficient ED nurses, many of whom now function as preceptors. Only one intern chose to leave the program before completion and four graduates sought employment in a less stressful environment. Since implementation of the program, we have increased our nurse retention rate, and have reduced patient-to-nurse ratios from 6:1 or 7:1 to 4:1. Recommendations: A well planned and executed ED internship program can be an effective means of attracting, orienting, and retaining new ED nurses, who might otherwise shy away from choosing the demanding but rewarding specialty of emergency nursing. The fact that only four of 44 interns to date left the program before the two-year commitment attests to the program's success in preparing and supporting new ED nurses. We are proud to say that our program graduates can function effectively and independently, and at the same time, derive satisfaction from being an ED nurse.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Emergency Nurses Association

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePreempting the Nursing Shortage: An ED Nurse Internship Programen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/162908-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Preempting the Nursing Shortage: An ED Nurse Internship Program</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Emergency Nurses Association</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Humphrey, Margaret, RN, MSM</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Christiana Care Health System - Wilmington Hospital</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Staff Development Specialist</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">501 West 14th Street, PO Box 1668, Wilmington, DE, 19899- 1668, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">(302) 488-4818</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">Mhumphrey@christianacare.org</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Margaret Pegge Humphrey, RN, MSM; Nicole McCarry, RN; Christina Monico, RN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Clinical Topic: The current nursing shortage threatens to undermine every branch of nursing. At particular risk is the fast paced, high-stress environment of the emergency room. In 2003, the ED at this two-hospital healthcare system, serving more than 145,000 ED patients annually, developed a nursing internship program to attract and orient new graduates or novice nurses who might otherwise fear beginning a career in a high-pressure specialty. The program's goals were to advance technical skills through formal and informal training and encourage personal growth through peer and preceptor relationships. Implementation: Candidates were recruited from job fairs and area nursing schools, and selection made based on interviews, letters of recommendation, and a commitment to work in our healthcare system's ED for a minimum of two years. New nurse graduate with at least a 3.2 GPA, or RN's with less than one year of experience, were eligible to apply. Interns received ample opportunities to demonstrate clinical competency in ED technical skills and procedures, apply critical thinking throughout the nursing process, and develop time management skills. The six month core curriculum included monthly or bi-monthly classes in such topics as dysrhythmia recognition, airway management, moderate sedation, domestic violence, hazardous material decontamination, critical care medication, organ procurement, and legal/ethical issues). Interns also attended certification training (ACLS, PALS, TNCC) taught by a range of hospital and specialty staff, including development educators, preceptors, physicians, respiratory therapists, MRI technicians, and others. Trainees also rotated through related departments (e.g., ICU, L &amp; D, the cardiac cath lab), and received mentoring and coaching from educators, preceptors, and assistant nurse managers. Weekly meetings with ED education staff and working closely with preceptors gave interns valuable opportunities to discuss on-the-job concerns, feelings and experiences. Progress was evaluated using a check list tool (the Basic Knowledge Assessment Test), and through informal discussions with preceptors and educators. The sole program costs to the hospital were for formal certification classes (between $45 and $100 per class); informal classes taught by hospital employees cost only staff time. Outcomes: To date, we have graduated three classes of interns, or 44 well prepared and proficient ED nurses, many of whom now function as preceptors. Only one intern chose to leave the program before completion and four graduates sought employment in a less stressful environment. Since implementation of the program, we have increased our nurse retention rate, and have reduced patient-to-nurse ratios from 6:1 or 7:1 to 4:1. Recommendations: A well planned and executed ED internship program can be an effective means of attracting, orienting, and retaining new ED nurses, who might otherwise shy away from choosing the demanding but rewarding specialty of emergency nursing. The fact that only four of 44 interns to date left the program before the two-year commitment attests to the program's success in preparing and supporting new ED nurses. We are proud to say that our program graduates can function effectively and independently, and at the same time, derive satisfaction from being an ED nurse.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T10:36:13Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T10:36:13Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
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