Factors Influencing Treatment Delay for Patients with Acute Myocardial Infarction

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/162913
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Factors Influencing Treatment Delay for Patients with Acute Myocardial Infarction
Abstract:
Factors Influencing Treatment Delay for Patients with Acute Myocardial Infarction
Conference Sponsor:Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Year:2006
Author:Lesneski, Lisa, RN, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Scranton
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:McGurrin Hall, Scranton, PA, 18510, USA
Contact Telephone:(570) 941-4346
Purpose: People are dying of acute myocardial infarctions (AMI) because they are not seeking treatment early enough. Elapsed time from the onset of symptoms to actual treatment has a significant effect on morbidity and mortality, and a delay may increase heart damage and reduce an individual's chance of survival. Early recognition of symptoms and subsequent treatment are key elements to preserve heart muscle and prevent death. The purpose of this study was to identify cognitive, social, and emotional influences of individuals who delay treatment when having symptoms of an AMI so that appropriate interventions can be determined. Design/Setting: A prospective descriptive study was conducted at three urban teaching hospitals located in Northeastern Pennsylvania. Sample: One hundred and five patients diagnosed with AMI were interviewed over a four month period. The mean age was 63.92 years old. The majority of the participants were men (69.5%), while 30.5% were women. The inclusion criteria were as follows: patients who were 18 years of age or older and able to read, understand, and speak English; patients who experienced symptoms of AMI outside the hospital and had an admission diagnosis of AMI confirmed by a physician diagnosis on the patient's medical record; and patients who were alert, oriented, pain free and willing to participate in the study. The exclusion criteria were as follows: patients admitted to the emergency department from nursing homes or assisted living facilities and patients who had been treated elsewhere and were transferred to the three hospitals participating in the study. The human rights of subjects were protected. Methodology: Subjects were interviewed face-to-face using the "Response to Symptoms Questionnaire." The questionnaire included both forced choice responses with multiple-choice answers and items rated using a Likert-type scale. The instrument had a Cronbach's alpha of 0.8. Three nurses with cardiovascular expertise established content validity. Results: The mean prehospital delay time among patients seeking treatment after experiencing the onset of AMI symptoms was 992 hours (16 hours and 53 minutes). In a multiple regression analysis, the following were associated with prolonged delay: being at home, experiencing mild to moderate pain, believing one had control over one's symptoms, and being in a public place. Conclusions: The findings of this study indicate that individuals may delay treatment when having symptoms of AMI due to specific cognitive, social, and emotional factors. Using this information, nurses may play a key preventive health role in educating the public, especially individuals at risk, about AMI symptoms and the need to seek medical treatment promptly. Further research is needed to determine other appropriate intervention strategies. [Research Presentation]
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Emergency Nurses Association

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleFactors Influencing Treatment Delay for Patients with Acute Myocardial Infarctionen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/162913-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Factors Influencing Treatment Delay for Patients with Acute Myocardial Infarction</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Emergency Nurses Association</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Lesneski, Lisa, RN, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Scranton</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">McGurrin Hall, Scranton, PA, 18510, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">(570) 941-4346</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">lesneskil2@scranton.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: People are dying of acute myocardial infarctions (AMI) because they are not seeking treatment early enough. Elapsed time from the onset of symptoms to actual treatment has a significant effect on morbidity and mortality, and a delay may increase heart damage and reduce an individual's chance of survival. Early recognition of symptoms and subsequent treatment are key elements to preserve heart muscle and prevent death. The purpose of this study was to identify cognitive, social, and emotional influences of individuals who delay treatment when having symptoms of an AMI so that appropriate interventions can be determined. Design/Setting: A prospective descriptive study was conducted at three urban teaching hospitals located in Northeastern Pennsylvania. Sample: One hundred and five patients diagnosed with AMI were interviewed over a four month period. The mean age was 63.92 years old. The majority of the participants were men (69.5%), while 30.5% were women. The inclusion criteria were as follows: patients who were 18 years of age or older and able to read, understand, and speak English; patients who experienced symptoms of AMI outside the hospital and had an admission diagnosis of AMI confirmed by a physician diagnosis on the patient's medical record; and patients who were alert, oriented, pain free and willing to participate in the study. The exclusion criteria were as follows: patients admitted to the emergency department from nursing homes or assisted living facilities and patients who had been treated elsewhere and were transferred to the three hospitals participating in the study. The human rights of subjects were protected. Methodology: Subjects were interviewed face-to-face using the &quot;Response to Symptoms Questionnaire.&quot; The questionnaire included both forced choice responses with multiple-choice answers and items rated using a Likert-type scale. The instrument had a Cronbach's alpha of 0.8. Three nurses with cardiovascular expertise established content validity. Results: The mean prehospital delay time among patients seeking treatment after experiencing the onset of AMI symptoms was 992 hours (16 hours and 53 minutes). In a multiple regression analysis, the following were associated with prolonged delay: being at home, experiencing mild to moderate pain, believing one had control over one's symptoms, and being in a public place. Conclusions: The findings of this study indicate that individuals may delay treatment when having symptoms of AMI due to specific cognitive, social, and emotional factors. Using this information, nurses may play a key preventive health role in educating the public, especially individuals at risk, about AMI symptoms and the need to seek medical treatment promptly. Further research is needed to determine other appropriate intervention strategies. [Research Presentation]</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T10:36:19Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T10:36:19Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
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