2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/162915
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Implications of Transportation Choices When a Pediatric Patient is Burned
Abstract:
Implications of Transportation Choices When a Pediatric Patient is Burned
Conference Sponsor:Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Year:2006
Author:Niedbala, Deborah K., RN, MSN
P.I. Institution Name:Children's Hospital Michigan
Title:Case Manager, Trauma
Contact Address:3901 Beaubien, Detroit, MI, 48201, USA
Contact Telephone:(313) 993-2602
Co-Authors:Sue Jane Smith, RN, MSN; Marc L. Cullen, MD
Purpose: Burns most commonly occur in the home and remain the number one cause of injury in children younger than 4 years of age. When the injury site is within the home, caregivers must choose whether to drive the injured child to an emergency department (ED) or rely on established emergency transportation, which often has standard operating procedures (SOPs) related to the care and transportation of a burned pediatric patient. Most caregivers are unaware that dialing 911 may get the injured child taken directly to a pediatric burn center where definitive care will be provided. When a burned pediatric patient is taken to a community ED, the nurses need to be cognizant of the standard of care required when providing treatment for these patients as well as recognize the need for expedient transfer to a pediatric burn center. The purpose of this study was to evaluate transportation choices and the standard of care received in community emergency departments when a pediatric patient was burned. Design: This was a quantitative, descriptive study. Setting/Sample: Sixty-two patients were taken from the injury sites to nearby hospitals and urgent care centers before being transferred to an urban pediatric burn center where the study took place. Methodology: During an 18-month time period, a trauma case manager reviewed the patients' Burn TRACS registry data, which included the mode of transportation to the initial ED and treatment received there, patient age, and percentage of burn surface area. Results: The most common method of transportation to the ED was private vehicle (74%), emergency transportation was used for 18% of the patients, and 8% was undocumented. The average patient age was 4 years with an average burn surface of 6.6%. Initial care prior to transfer to the pediatric burn center consisted of cold and wet dressings 44%; dry and sterile dressings 15%; anti-microbial (mostly Silvadene) dressings 16%; and 24% had no documentation. Conclusions: In the chaos of the moment, a caregiver's reaction to drive a burned child to the nearest treatment site may seem appropriate, but by doing so, definitive treatment may be delayed and established emergency medical systems (EMS) SOPs unknowingly bypassed. Public education which reinforces the need to call 911, regardless of the emergency, may aid in definitive care reaching patients in a more timely manner. Additionally, substandard pediatric burn care may be administered in emergency departments and urgent care centers. The current Advanced Burn Life Support recommendations from the American Burn Association are to place patients in dry, sterile dressings prior to transfer to a burn center, and yet only 15% of the referring EDs in this study did so. Undocumented treatment may indicate some patients do not receive burn care at all. Collaborative, multi-disciplinary educational opportunities and treatment protocols need to be developed through partnerships between pediatric burn centers and transferring community emergency departments. [Research Presentation]
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Emergency Nurses Association

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleImplications of Transportation Choices When a Pediatric Patient is Burneden_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/162915-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Implications of Transportation Choices When a Pediatric Patient is Burned</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Emergency Nurses Association</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Niedbala, Deborah K., RN, MSN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Children's Hospital Michigan</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Case Manager, Trauma</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">3901 Beaubien, Detroit, MI, 48201, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">(313) 993-2602</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">dniedbal@dmc.org</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Sue Jane Smith, RN, MSN; Marc L. Cullen, MD</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: Burns most commonly occur in the home and remain the number one cause of injury in children younger than 4 years of age. When the injury site is within the home, caregivers must choose whether to drive the injured child to an emergency department (ED) or rely on established emergency transportation, which often has standard operating procedures (SOPs) related to the care and transportation of a burned pediatric patient. Most caregivers are unaware that dialing 911 may get the injured child taken directly to a pediatric burn center where definitive care will be provided. When a burned pediatric patient is taken to a community ED, the nurses need to be cognizant of the standard of care required when providing treatment for these patients as well as recognize the need for expedient transfer to a pediatric burn center. The purpose of this study was to evaluate transportation choices and the standard of care received in community emergency departments when a pediatric patient was burned. Design: This was a quantitative, descriptive study. Setting/Sample: Sixty-two patients were taken from the injury sites to nearby hospitals and urgent care centers before being transferred to an urban pediatric burn center where the study took place. Methodology: During an 18-month time period, a trauma case manager reviewed the patients' Burn TRACS registry data, which included the mode of transportation to the initial ED and treatment received there, patient age, and percentage of burn surface area. Results: The most common method of transportation to the ED was private vehicle (74%), emergency transportation was used for 18% of the patients, and 8% was undocumented. The average patient age was 4 years with an average burn surface of 6.6%. Initial care prior to transfer to the pediatric burn center consisted of cold and wet dressings 44%; dry and sterile dressings 15%; anti-microbial (mostly Silvadene) dressings 16%; and 24% had no documentation. Conclusions: In the chaos of the moment, a caregiver's reaction to drive a burned child to the nearest treatment site may seem appropriate, but by doing so, definitive treatment may be delayed and established emergency medical systems (EMS) SOPs unknowingly bypassed. Public education which reinforces the need to call 911, regardless of the emergency, may aid in definitive care reaching patients in a more timely manner. Additionally, substandard pediatric burn care may be administered in emergency departments and urgent care centers. The current Advanced Burn Life Support recommendations from the American Burn Association are to place patients in dry, sterile dressings prior to transfer to a burn center, and yet only 15% of the referring EDs in this study did so. Undocumented treatment may indicate some patients do not receive burn care at all. Collaborative, multi-disciplinary educational opportunities and treatment protocols need to be developed through partnerships between pediatric burn centers and transferring community emergency departments. [Research Presentation]</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T10:36:21Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T10:36:21Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
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