2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/162917
Type:
Presentation
Title:
New Emergency Nurses? Descriptions of Becoming a More Experienced Nurse
Abstract:
New Emergency Nurses? Descriptions of Becoming a More Experienced Nurse
Conference Sponsor:Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Year:2006
Author:Rampersaud, Patricia, RN, BSc, BScN, MSN
P.I. Institution Name:Douglas College, Bachelor of Science in Nursing Program
Title:Nursing Faculty
Contact Address:700 Royal Ave., Westminster, BC, V3L 5B2, Canada
Contact Telephone:(604) 527-5794
Purpose: Currently there is a shortage of emergency nurses and the problem is likely to expand if new nurses are not retained. The workplace environment may play a key role in the job satisfaction and subsequent retention of nurses. The purpose of this study was to describe the experiences of new emergency nurses and the intent to leave their current position. Design: The analytical, qualitative research approach of interpretive description was used. Setting/Sample: Using theoretical sampling, eight new emergency nurses were recruited from Vancouver Island and the lower mainland of Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. They had completed the core courses of an emergency speciality program and had three years or less of emergency nursing experience in community and urban emergency departments. Ethical approval was obtained from the University of British Columbia Behavioural Research Ethics Board and the Fraser Health Clinical Investigation Committee. Methodology: Ten in-depth, semistructured, audiotaped, face-to-face interviews were conducted with the nurses. Two participants were interviewed twice to further explore, verify, and check emerging themes. Data appropriateness, data adequacy, fieldnotes, a reflective journal, an audit trail journal, checking the representativeness of the data with participants, and consultation with three nurse researchers were employed. Results: All of the new emergency nurses felt overwhelmed and unprepared as they started their practice. Hospital overcrowding created an environment where the nurses experienced occupational stress, mental and physical fatigue, and abuse from patients, their families, and emergency personnel. All the nurses described experiencing horizontal violence from nursing colleagues. Other workplace factors also challenged safe and ethical nursing practice and included: nursing shortages, a lack of resources, frustrations with management, high patient acuity and volume, attempting to meet organizational and technical changes, and the expectations of patients and their families. All the participants expressed feelings of frustration, stress, exhaustion, and being overwhelmed. Six of the eight nurses anticipated leaving the emergency department or changing their status in a year. These changes included: working in a different hospital (2 nurses), becoming a charge nurse, going on maternity leave, practicing in another area of nursing, or leaving the nursing profession. Conclusions: It is imperative that governments, health care institutions, and nursing organizations develop initiatives to retain emergency nurses. Workplace factors that contribute to nurse dissatisfaction must be identified and addressed. Prevention and management strategies and creative solutions regarding hospital overcrowding and horizontal violence must be developed and implemented. Policies that reflect a philosophy of shared patient care throughout the hospital system and that have zero tolerance for abuse may help alleviate the challenges nurses face and their desire to leave their positions. Further research is needed to explore the impact of workplace factors on emergency nurses and their intent to leave. [Research Presentation]
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Emergency Nurses Association

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleNew Emergency Nurses? Descriptions of Becoming a More Experienced Nurseen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/162917-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">New Emergency Nurses? Descriptions of Becoming a More Experienced Nurse</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Emergency Nurses Association</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Rampersaud, Patricia, RN, BSc, BScN, MSN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Douglas College, Bachelor of Science in Nursing Program</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Nursing Faculty</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">700 Royal Ave., Westminster, BC, V3L 5B2, Canada</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">(604) 527-5794</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">trishr@telus.net</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: Currently there is a shortage of emergency nurses and the problem is likely to expand if new nurses are not retained. The workplace environment may play a key role in the job satisfaction and subsequent retention of nurses. The purpose of this study was to describe the experiences of new emergency nurses and the intent to leave their current position. Design: The analytical, qualitative research approach of interpretive description was used. Setting/Sample: Using theoretical sampling, eight new emergency nurses were recruited from Vancouver Island and the lower mainland of Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. They had completed the core courses of an emergency speciality program and had three years or less of emergency nursing experience in community and urban emergency departments. Ethical approval was obtained from the University of British Columbia Behavioural Research Ethics Board and the Fraser Health Clinical Investigation Committee. Methodology: Ten in-depth, semistructured, audiotaped, face-to-face interviews were conducted with the nurses. Two participants were interviewed twice to further explore, verify, and check emerging themes. Data appropriateness, data adequacy, fieldnotes, a reflective journal, an audit trail journal, checking the representativeness of the data with participants, and consultation with three nurse researchers were employed. Results: All of the new emergency nurses felt overwhelmed and unprepared as they started their practice. Hospital overcrowding created an environment where the nurses experienced occupational stress, mental and physical fatigue, and abuse from patients, their families, and emergency personnel. All the nurses described experiencing horizontal violence from nursing colleagues. Other workplace factors also challenged safe and ethical nursing practice and included: nursing shortages, a lack of resources, frustrations with management, high patient acuity and volume, attempting to meet organizational and technical changes, and the expectations of patients and their families. All the participants expressed feelings of frustration, stress, exhaustion, and being overwhelmed. Six of the eight nurses anticipated leaving the emergency department or changing their status in a year. These changes included: working in a different hospital (2 nurses), becoming a charge nurse, going on maternity leave, practicing in another area of nursing, or leaving the nursing profession. Conclusions: It is imperative that governments, health care institutions, and nursing organizations develop initiatives to retain emergency nurses. Workplace factors that contribute to nurse dissatisfaction must be identified and addressed. Prevention and management strategies and creative solutions regarding hospital overcrowding and horizontal violence must be developed and implemented. Policies that reflect a philosophy of shared patient care throughout the hospital system and that have zero tolerance for abuse may help alleviate the challenges nurses face and their desire to leave their positions. Further research is needed to explore the impact of workplace factors on emergency nurses and their intent to leave. [Research Presentation]</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T10:36:22Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T10:36:22Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
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