2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/162925
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Emergency Data and Staff, Making a Difference in ATV Policy
Abstract:
Emergency Data and Staff, Making a Difference in ATV Policy
Conference Sponsor:Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Year:2006
Author:Williams, Janice, MSED
P.I. Institution Name:Carolinas Medical Center
Contact Address:PO Box 32861- ROB 411, Charlotte, NC, 28211, USA
Contact Telephone:(704) 355-9236
Injury Prevention Topic: Emergency Nurses make significant contributions to reduce the burden of injury in their communities through a variety of methods, including bedside teaching moments, screening and referrals, speaking at community outreach venues, participating in health fairs, and advocating for policies and enforcement. A project at a level one academic trauma center demonstrates how emergency department data combined with an emergency healthcare provider's professional expertise was utilized to support North Carolina's All Terrain Vehicle (ATV) legislation . At the time of project implementation, the ATV manufacturers were attempting to lower the age restrictions in this legislation. Based on recommendations from the local state representatives, the one tool that would be effective to ensure stronger legislation was "healthcare" provider data and testimony. Implementation: The injury center at this level one trauma center began efforts to support the stronger recommendations that representatives thought would be most effective. The following steps were taken: 1) Sought approval to collect emergency department (ED) and trauma related ATV injury data and ask healthcare providers to participate in an advocacy campaign. 2) Collect data while complying with HIPPA. 3) Using that data, an e-mail campaign identified the ED staff who could provide testimony to the legislature on this issue. The data collected showed that, in 2004, the trauma center, had just as many ED visits for 6-11 year olds as 12-16 year olds, 36 and 48 respectively. ATV injuries that required trauma care for patients under the age of 12 had increased 60%. The emergency department physicians, upon reviewing the data and the potential changes to ATV legislation lent their support to the initiative. Outcome: The ATV law passed with stronger age restrictions by engine size, a safety course attendance requirement, and requirements of use of safety devices such as goggles and helmets. Recommendations: While this specific project utilized emergency physicians, emergency nurses could provide this type of outreach following similar steps. This example gives emphasis to the fact that injury prevention outreach activities can benefit greatly from emergency staff participation as their involvement lends medical credibility to initiatives and they have access to valuable data that can quantify, support, and target interventions. Therefore, consideration should be given to ways that promote greater involvement and participation from emergency department nurses/staff in data and advocacy driven activities. In addition, a system in which valuable emergency department discharge and billing based data is available to emergency nurses would be invaluable. One other consideration needs to be taken by emergency nurses and staff . Obtain administrative and IRB approval for data utilization in advocacy type activities and for representation by the nurse as an employee of that hospital before such a project is undertaken.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Emergency Nurses Association

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEmergency Data and Staff, Making a Difference in ATV Policyen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/162925-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Emergency Data and Staff, Making a Difference in ATV Policy</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Emergency Nurses Association</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Williams, Janice, MSED</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Carolinas Medical Center</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">PO Box 32861- ROB 411, Charlotte, NC, 28211, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">(704) 355-9236</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">Janice.williams@carolinashealthcare.org, Director</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Injury Prevention Topic: Emergency Nurses make significant contributions to reduce the burden of injury in their communities through a variety of methods, including bedside teaching moments, screening and referrals, speaking at community outreach venues, participating in health fairs, and advocating for policies and enforcement. A project at a level one academic trauma center demonstrates how emergency department data combined with an emergency healthcare provider's professional expertise was utilized to support North Carolina's All Terrain Vehicle (ATV) legislation . At the time of project implementation, the ATV manufacturers were attempting to lower the age restrictions in this legislation. Based on recommendations from the local state representatives, the one tool that would be effective to ensure stronger legislation was &quot;healthcare&quot; provider data and testimony. Implementation: The injury center at this level one trauma center began efforts to support the stronger recommendations that representatives thought would be most effective. The following steps were taken: 1) Sought approval to collect emergency department (ED) and trauma related ATV injury data and ask healthcare providers to participate in an advocacy campaign. 2) Collect data while complying with HIPPA. 3) Using that data, an e-mail campaign identified the ED staff who could provide testimony to the legislature on this issue. The data collected showed that, in 2004, the trauma center, had just as many ED visits for 6-11 year olds as 12-16 year olds, 36 and 48 respectively. ATV injuries that required trauma care for patients under the age of 12 had increased 60%. The emergency department physicians, upon reviewing the data and the potential changes to ATV legislation lent their support to the initiative. Outcome: The ATV law passed with stronger age restrictions by engine size, a safety course attendance requirement, and requirements of use of safety devices such as goggles and helmets. Recommendations: While this specific project utilized emergency physicians, emergency nurses could provide this type of outreach following similar steps. This example gives emphasis to the fact that injury prevention outreach activities can benefit greatly from emergency staff participation as their involvement lends medical credibility to initiatives and they have access to valuable data that can quantify, support, and target interventions. Therefore, consideration should be given to ways that promote greater involvement and participation from emergency department nurses/staff in data and advocacy driven activities. In addition, a system in which valuable emergency department discharge and billing based data is available to emergency nurses would be invaluable. One other consideration needs to be taken by emergency nurses and staff . Obtain administrative and IRB approval for data utilization in advocacy type activities and for representation by the nurse as an employee of that hospital before such a project is undertaken.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T10:36:31Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T10:36:31Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
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