ED Disaster Preparation: Adapting Pre-Existing Plans to Multiple Disaster Scenarios

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/162926
Type:
Presentation
Title:
ED Disaster Preparation: Adapting Pre-Existing Plans to Multiple Disaster Scenarios
Abstract:
ED Disaster Preparation: Adapting Pre-Existing Plans to Multiple Disaster Scenarios
Conference Sponsor:Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Year:2006
Author:Wofford, Daphne Ponds, RN, BSN
P.I. Institution Name:Brackenridge Hospital -Seton Healthcare Network
Title:Staff RN IV, Charge Nurse
Contact Address:601 E. 15th St., Austin, TX, 78701, USA
Contact Telephone:(512) 324-7033
Clinical Topic: In 2005, multiple emergency department (ED) disaster plans were tested by the monumental natural disasters striking the U.S. Gulf Coast. The unpredictability and variation of natural disasters requires emergency departments to engage in disaster preparation that is adaptable to a variety of disaster scenarios, while avoiding overcrowding and poor patient outcomes when treating the standard patient and disaster victim populations simultaneously. This emergency department's disaster plans were successfully adapted to two different patient populations. Implementation: This 35-bed, Level II trauma center in Texas responded to Hurricanes Katrina and Rita by adapting pre-existing disaster plans to the differing specific needs of the hurricane victims during two three-day time periods. For Hurricane Katrina, the ED staff prepared to receive an unspecified number of evacuees via ground and air transportation. A parking garage under an on-site helipad was maximized as an evacuee receiving area stocked with cots, portable showers, and food and water coolers to accommodate eighty patients. Hospital resources, local retailers, and community organizations provided the additional supplies. Mild dehydration and minor cuts/scrapes were treated under the helipad while those in need of inpatient treatment were transferred into the main emergency department. Katrina evacuee needs focused more on hygiene necessities and nutrition before being transferred a shelter. Conversely, hospital administration changed the evacuee receiving area into a triage and minor care area for the standard patient population, while a specific number of hospital-to-hospital inpatient evacuee transfers were brought directly into the emergency department for Hurricane Rita victims. As many of the Rita evacuees were in need of cardiac monitoring, IV therapy, and a timed medication regime requiring expedient transfer to an admission bed, an adaptation to the disaster plan was warranted. Outcomes: The flexible disaster preparations allowed for successful control of the influx of evacuees in a safe and manageable environment. In 2004, the emergency department treated approximately 76,000 patients per year (208 patients per day). In three days, 154 Katrina evacuees were evaluated in the receiving area, an increase of 25% over the average three-day patient census. Eighty-one of these evacuees were treated on the first day alone, a 39% increase over the average daily census. Similarly, the emergency department received 108 Rita evacuees in a three-day time period, an increase of over 17%. The normal patient population was essentially unaffected by the surge of evacuees due to the use of the helipad and the collaborative effort of the hospital to expedite standard and evacuee patient populations to inpatient beds. The strengths of the initiatives revolved around the successful external collaboration of the ED staff, volunteers, and the community, as well as the internal collaboration of the hospital. An identified weakness was the lack of preparation to receive the masses of donations causing unforeseen storage and distribution problems. Recommendations: ED disaster preparation plans need to be continually evaluated for effectiveness as new evidenced-based practice data is collected from the natural disaster relief efforts of 2005. To avoid patient overcrowding and straining current ED systems, ED nurses should test pre-existing disaster plans while developing and utilizing multiple scenarios to transform limited ED spaces into multifunctional disaster preparation units.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Emergency Nurses Association

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleED Disaster Preparation: Adapting Pre-Existing Plans to Multiple Disaster Scenariosen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/162926-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">ED Disaster Preparation: Adapting Pre-Existing Plans to Multiple Disaster Scenarios</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Emergency Nurses Association</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Wofford, Daphne Ponds, RN, BSN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Brackenridge Hospital -Seton Healthcare Network</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Staff RN IV, Charge Nurse<br/></td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">601 E. 15th St., Austin, TX, 78701, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">(512) 324-7033</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">dwofford77@yahoo.com</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Clinical Topic: In 2005, multiple emergency department (ED) disaster plans were tested by the monumental natural disasters striking the U.S. Gulf Coast. The unpredictability and variation of natural disasters requires emergency departments to engage in disaster preparation that is adaptable to a variety of disaster scenarios, while avoiding overcrowding and poor patient outcomes when treating the standard patient and disaster victim populations simultaneously. This emergency department's disaster plans were successfully adapted to two different patient populations. Implementation: This 35-bed, Level II trauma center in Texas responded to Hurricanes Katrina and Rita by adapting pre-existing disaster plans to the differing specific needs of the hurricane victims during two three-day time periods. For Hurricane Katrina, the ED staff prepared to receive an unspecified number of evacuees via ground and air transportation. A parking garage under an on-site helipad was maximized as an evacuee receiving area stocked with cots, portable showers, and food and water coolers to accommodate eighty patients. Hospital resources, local retailers, and community organizations provided the additional supplies. Mild dehydration and minor cuts/scrapes were treated under the helipad while those in need of inpatient treatment were transferred into the main emergency department. Katrina evacuee needs focused more on hygiene necessities and nutrition before being transferred a shelter. Conversely, hospital administration changed the evacuee receiving area into a triage and minor care area for the standard patient population, while a specific number of hospital-to-hospital inpatient evacuee transfers were brought directly into the emergency department for Hurricane Rita victims. As many of the Rita evacuees were in need of cardiac monitoring, IV therapy, and a timed medication regime requiring expedient transfer to an admission bed, an adaptation to the disaster plan was warranted. Outcomes: The flexible disaster preparations allowed for successful control of the influx of evacuees in a safe and manageable environment. In 2004, the emergency department treated approximately 76,000 patients per year (208 patients per day). In three days, 154 Katrina evacuees were evaluated in the receiving area, an increase of 25% over the average three-day patient census. Eighty-one of these evacuees were treated on the first day alone, a 39% increase over the average daily census. Similarly, the emergency department received 108 Rita evacuees in a three-day time period, an increase of over 17%. The normal patient population was essentially unaffected by the surge of evacuees due to the use of the helipad and the collaborative effort of the hospital to expedite standard and evacuee patient populations to inpatient beds. The strengths of the initiatives revolved around the successful external collaboration of the ED staff, volunteers, and the community, as well as the internal collaboration of the hospital. An identified weakness was the lack of preparation to receive the masses of donations causing unforeseen storage and distribution problems. Recommendations: ED disaster preparation plans need to be continually evaluated for effectiveness as new evidenced-based practice data is collected from the natural disaster relief efforts of 2005. To avoid patient overcrowding and straining current ED systems, ED nurses should test pre-existing disaster plans while developing and utilizing multiple scenarios to transform limited ED spaces into multifunctional disaster preparation units.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T10:36:32Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T10:36:32Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
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