2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/162934
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Emergency Nurses' Diagnostic Reasoning and Clinical Experience
Abstract:
Emergency Nurses' Diagnostic Reasoning and Clinical Experience
Conference Sponsor:Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Year:2002
Author:Ferrario, Catherine, DNSc, RNC
P.I. Institution Name:University of St. Francis
Contact Address:290 Springfield Avenue, Joliet, IL, 60435, USA
Contact Telephone:(815) 773-7086
Purpose: Diagnostic reasoning tasks have become more cognitively demanding for nurses. Tversky and Kahneman's theory of heuristics suggests that cognitive shortcuts simplify and accelerate decision tasks in uncertain, complex situations. Emergency nurses' use of cognitive shortcuts may evolve with experience - many patient encounters produce patterns and prototypes in long-term memory. Design: A descriptive design was used to compare the use of cognitive shortcuts by emergency nurses who were experienced (five years or more emergency nursing experience) and less experienced (less than five years' experience). Setting: Computerized random sampling identified 620 participants FROM 21,577 Emergency Nurses Association members. Sample: Of the sample of 620 nurses, 314 (50.6%) returned the questionnaire, but only 219 (35.3%) met the study criteria of delivering direct patient care a minimum of 16 hours per week. The typical respondent was female (N=183; 85.9%), 42.4 years old (SD = 8.3), and BSN prepared (N=85; 39.0%). Emergency nursing experience ranged from 1 to 40 years (mean - 11.5; SD = 6.9). Methodology: Participants were mailed a sociodemographic form and Clinical Inference Vignettes, representing 16 clinical emergency situations and 4 types of heuristics; Judging by Perceived Modal Frequency; Judging by Essential Similarity; Judging by Subset Variability; and Judging by Perceived Causal System. Emergency nursing experts estimated a perfect content validity index of 1.00, and Cronbach's alpha was used to estimate internal consistency reliability. Results: Experienced nurses were more likely to make judgments using the cognitive shortcut, Judging by Perceived Causal System, than were less experienced nurses (X2 = 3.98, df = 1, p = 0.46). Conclusions: Experienced nurses used cause and effect relations in their diagnostic reasoning to solve simulations of emergency decision tasks. Structured care approaches, such as decision algorithms, clinical pathways, and clinical practice guidelines, may provide standardized shortcuts to help emergency nurses in their high-pressure, complex patient care situations. [Research Paper Presentation]
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Emergency Nurses Association

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEmergency Nurses' Diagnostic Reasoning and Clinical Experienceen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/162934-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Emergency Nurses' Diagnostic Reasoning and Clinical Experience</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Emergency Nurses Association</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Ferrario, Catherine, DNSc, RNC</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of St. Francis</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">290 Springfield Avenue, Joliet, IL, 60435, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">(815) 773-7086</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">kayferr@ameritech.net</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: Diagnostic reasoning tasks have become more cognitively demanding for nurses. Tversky and Kahneman's theory of heuristics suggests that cognitive shortcuts simplify and accelerate decision tasks in uncertain, complex situations. Emergency nurses' use of cognitive shortcuts may evolve with experience - many patient encounters produce patterns and prototypes in long-term memory. Design: A descriptive design was used to compare the use of cognitive shortcuts by emergency nurses who were experienced (five years or more emergency nursing experience) and less experienced (less than five years' experience). Setting: Computerized random sampling identified 620 participants FROM 21,577 Emergency Nurses Association members. Sample: Of the sample of 620 nurses, 314 (50.6%) returned the questionnaire, but only 219 (35.3%) met the study criteria of delivering direct patient care a minimum of 16 hours per week. The typical respondent was female (N=183; 85.9%), 42.4 years old (SD = 8.3), and BSN prepared (N=85; 39.0%). Emergency nursing experience ranged from 1 to 40 years (mean - 11.5; SD = 6.9). Methodology: Participants were mailed a sociodemographic form and Clinical Inference Vignettes, representing 16 clinical emergency situations and 4 types of heuristics; Judging by Perceived Modal Frequency; Judging by Essential Similarity; Judging by Subset Variability; and Judging by Perceived Causal System. Emergency nursing experts estimated a perfect content validity index of 1.00, and Cronbach's alpha was used to estimate internal consistency reliability. Results: Experienced nurses were more likely to make judgments using the cognitive shortcut, Judging by Perceived Causal System, than were less experienced nurses (X2 = 3.98, df = 1, p = 0.46). Conclusions: Experienced nurses used cause and effect relations in their diagnostic reasoning to solve simulations of emergency decision tasks. Structured care approaches, such as decision algorithms, clinical pathways, and clinical practice guidelines, may provide standardized shortcuts to help emergency nurses in their high-pressure, complex patient care situations. [Research Paper Presentation]</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T10:36:40Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T10:36:40Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
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