2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/162938
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Emergency department nurses' knowledge of common herbal remedies
Abstract:
Emergency department nurses' knowledge of common herbal remedies
Conference Sponsor:Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Year:2002
Author:King, Theresa Renee, RN, BSN, CEN
Contact Address:, TX, USA
Contact Telephone:(713) 515-1126
Purpose(s): The sale of herbals has increased to over three billion dollars in the year 2000. Herbals may interact with medications leading to adverse reactions. Little is known about the level of knowledge that emergency department nurses possess concerning herbals. The purposes of this study were to: a) identify the level of knowledge that emergency department nurses possess about herbal remedies; b) determine whether ED nurses who are certified as emergency nurses (CEN) differ in their knowledge from those who are not certified; and c) determine whether the level of knowledge differs between nurses who document and do not document patient use of herbal remedies. Design: This study was designed as non-experimental, cross-sectional, and descriptive in nature. Sample: The original 2001 ENA General Assembly delegation. Setting: Delegates were mailed a cover letter, a demographic form, a 10-question herbal examination and a postage-paid return envelope. Methodology: Ten points were awarded for each correct answer on the examination. Content validity of exam and demographic questions were evaluated by UT - Houston ENP-MSN students and faculty. Results: The total response rate was 39%. Score ranged from 10 to 80 (M=41.99, SD=15.3). More than 76% of the sample could not identify potential adverse responses to more than five of the top selling herbal remedies. The mean score for CEN nurses (M=40.26, SD=15.65) was statistically different from the mean score (M=47.35, SD=13.81) for nurses not certified with an obtained t-value of 2.83 (df =147, p>0.05). Conclusions: This study heightens awareness for future research and education. Education concerning herbal remedies needs to be included in nursing programs and continuing education seminars. To meet JCAHO recommendations for maintaining and assessing clinical competence of nurses, institutions must provide appropriate resource data, assessment testing, and triage protocols concerning herbal remedies. [Research Poster Presentation]
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Emergency Nurses Association

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEmergency department nurses' knowledge of common herbal remediesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/162938-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Emergency department nurses' knowledge of common herbal remedies</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Emergency Nurses Association</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">King, Theresa Renee, RN, BSN, CEN</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">, TX, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">(713) 515-1126</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">trking777@aol.com</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose(s): The sale of herbals has increased to over three billion dollars in the year 2000. Herbals may interact with medications leading to adverse reactions. Little is known about the level of knowledge that emergency department nurses possess concerning herbals. The purposes of this study were to: a) identify the level of knowledge that emergency department nurses possess about herbal remedies; b) determine whether ED nurses who are certified as emergency nurses (CEN) differ in their knowledge from those who are not certified; and c) determine whether the level of knowledge differs between nurses who document and do not document patient use of herbal remedies. Design: This study was designed as non-experimental, cross-sectional, and descriptive in nature. Sample: The original 2001 ENA General Assembly delegation. Setting: Delegates were mailed a cover letter, a demographic form, a 10-question herbal examination and a postage-paid return envelope. Methodology: Ten points were awarded for each correct answer on the examination. Content validity of exam and demographic questions were evaluated by UT - Houston ENP-MSN students and faculty. Results: The total response rate was 39%. Score ranged from 10 to 80 (M=41.99, SD=15.3). More than 76% of the sample could not identify potential adverse responses to more than five of the top selling herbal remedies. The mean score for CEN nurses (M=40.26, SD=15.65) was statistically different from the mean score (M=47.35, SD=13.81) for nurses not certified with an obtained t-value of 2.83 (df =147, p&gt;0.05). Conclusions: This study heightens awareness for future research and education. Education concerning herbal remedies needs to be included in nursing programs and continuing education seminars. To meet JCAHO recommendations for maintaining and assessing clinical competence of nurses, institutions must provide appropriate resource data, assessment testing, and triage protocols concerning herbal remedies. [Research Poster Presentation]</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T10:36:44Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T10:36:44Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
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