2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/162941
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Point of Care, Rapid Strep Testing
Abstract:
Point of Care, Rapid Strep Testing
Conference Sponsor:Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Year:2002
Author:Loney, Susan, RN, BSN
Contact Address:, Cleveland, OH, USA
Contact Telephone:(216) 445-4542
Co-Authors:John Filka, RN, BSN
Clinical Topic: In an effort to expedite care of patients presenting to our Emergency Department (ED) with a sore throat, and to improve patient and staff satisfaction, a Rapid Strep Point of Care Test (POCT) was implemented. Implementation: A multidisciplinary approach was taken using the following steps: 1) The ED leadership reviewed the feasibility of the test; 2) A proposal for implementation was submitted to the Hospital POCT Committee; 3) A "Train-the-trainer" method was utilized for staff training; 4) Proper use of this POCT is an annual competency requirement. Training included sending a culture to the lab to confirm the negative POCT. Outcomes: Time interval between "Time seen by an MD" and "Time discharged" was measured prior to and after implementation of the Rapid Strep POCT. Data revealed a decrease in this interval on day, evening and night shifts by an average of 15 minutes, 30 minutes, and 62 minutes respectively. All patients with a positive culture are contacted within 24 hours of the final result for appropriate treatment. Compliance with sending a confirmation test to the main lab was 95% in 2001; 10% of the negative POCT were positive by laboratory culture. Recommendations: The decrease in "Time seen by an MD" and "Time discharged" has not affected time between arrival in the department and time patient is placed in exam room. As a result, we are exploring the possibility of adding the POCT to our triage protocols. [Clinical Poster Presentation]
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Emergency Nurses Association

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePoint of Care, Rapid Strep Testingen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/162941-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Point of Care, Rapid Strep Testing</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Emergency Nurses Association</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Loney, Susan, RN, BSN</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">, Cleveland, OH, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">(216) 445-4542</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">Loneys@ccf.org</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">John Filka, RN, BSN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Clinical Topic: In an effort to expedite care of patients presenting to our Emergency Department (ED) with a sore throat, and to improve patient and staff satisfaction, a Rapid Strep Point of Care Test (POCT) was implemented. Implementation: A multidisciplinary approach was taken using the following steps: 1) The ED leadership reviewed the feasibility of the test; 2) A proposal for implementation was submitted to the Hospital POCT Committee; 3) A &quot;Train-the-trainer&quot; method was utilized for staff training; 4) Proper use of this POCT is an annual competency requirement. Training included sending a culture to the lab to confirm the negative POCT. Outcomes: Time interval between &quot;Time seen by an MD&quot; and &quot;Time discharged&quot; was measured prior to and after implementation of the Rapid Strep POCT. Data revealed a decrease in this interval on day, evening and night shifts by an average of 15 minutes, 30 minutes, and 62 minutes respectively. All patients with a positive culture are contacted within 24 hours of the final result for appropriate treatment. Compliance with sending a confirmation test to the main lab was 95% in 2001; 10% of the negative POCT were positive by laboratory culture. Recommendations: The decrease in &quot;Time seen by an MD&quot; and &quot;Time discharged&quot; has not affected time between arrival in the department and time patient is placed in exam room. As a result, we are exploring the possibility of adding the POCT to our triage protocols. [Clinical Poster Presentation]</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T10:36:47Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T10:36:47Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
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