In-Flight Medical Emergencies: The Perceived Role of Emergency Nurses and Challenges of the Cabin Environment

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/162942
Type:
Presentation
Title:
In-Flight Medical Emergencies: The Perceived Role of Emergency Nurses and Challenges of the Cabin Environment
Abstract:
In-Flight Medical Emergencies: The Perceived Role of Emergency Nurses and Challenges of the Cabin Environment
Conference Sponsor:Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Year:2002
Author:Mahony, Paul, RN, RICN, MSN, Med, MAITD, PGDipEd, BSc
P.I. Institution Name:Blue Mountains Hospital
Contact Address:Great Western Highway, Katoomba, NSW, 02780, Australia
Clinical Topic: The intent of this clinical project was to examine: 1) how emergency nurses who volunteered to assist cabin crew contributed to clinical outcomes in the management of in-flight medical emergencies; 2) the perception of their role; and 3) the challenges of the cabin environment. Implementation: Planning and implementation included the following: 1) the preparation and submission of a detailed research proposal; 2) the formation of an advisory committee of international aviation medicine experts; 3) a review of existing data on in-flight medical emergencies from a cross section of airlines; 4) examination of the medical equipment carried by airlines and the challenges of the cabin environment; and 5) the perceptions held by cabin crew of the expertise emergency nurses can provide. Outcomes: The ongoing research project has yielded preliminary findings, including: 1) the types and relative frequencies of in-flight medical emergencies fall within a consistent set of diagnostic categories; 2) cabin crew with little experience of medical emergencies consistently called for physician volunteers amongst the passengers, whereas crew who had experienced many medical emergencies also asked for nurses; 3) nurses and physicians with an emergency background were perceived to perform better and were preferred volunteers compared with generalists; 4) emergency nurses were generally unfamiliar with the limitations and altered performance characteristics in medical equipment on board aircraft at altitude; and 5) cabin space limitations and G forces pose special occupational safety and health implications for nurses. Recommendations: 1) improve cabin crew training to include familiarization with medical equipment and the unique expertise emergency nurses can provide; 2) inform emergency nurses of the types and relative frequencies of in-flight medical emergencies, what to expect in the way of occupational safety and health issues in-flight, and how the cabin environment influences the functioning of medical equipment; 3) advise airlines that emergency nurses should have a higher profile in cabin crew training; and 4) conduct further research into the role of emergency nurses in clinical outcomes of in-flight medical emergencies. [Clinical Poster Presentation]
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Emergency Nurses Association

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleIn-Flight Medical Emergencies: The Perceived Role of Emergency Nurses and Challenges of the Cabin Environmenten_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/162942-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">In-Flight Medical Emergencies: The Perceived Role of Emergency Nurses and Challenges of the Cabin Environment</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Emergency Nurses Association</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Mahony, Paul, RN, RICN, MSN, Med, MAITD, PGDipEd, BSc</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Blue Mountains Hospital</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Great Western Highway, Katoomba, NSW, 02780, Australia</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">mahonyp@wahs.nsw.gov.au</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Clinical Topic: The intent of this clinical project was to examine: 1) how emergency nurses who volunteered to assist cabin crew contributed to clinical outcomes in the management of in-flight medical emergencies; 2) the perception of their role; and 3) the challenges of the cabin environment. Implementation: Planning and implementation included the following: 1) the preparation and submission of a detailed research proposal; 2) the formation of an advisory committee of international aviation medicine experts; 3) a review of existing data on in-flight medical emergencies from a cross section of airlines; 4) examination of the medical equipment carried by airlines and the challenges of the cabin environment; and 5) the perceptions held by cabin crew of the expertise emergency nurses can provide. Outcomes: The ongoing research project has yielded preliminary findings, including: 1) the types and relative frequencies of in-flight medical emergencies fall within a consistent set of diagnostic categories; 2) cabin crew with little experience of medical emergencies consistently called for physician volunteers amongst the passengers, whereas crew who had experienced many medical emergencies also asked for nurses; 3) nurses and physicians with an emergency background were perceived to perform better and were preferred volunteers compared with generalists; 4) emergency nurses were generally unfamiliar with the limitations and altered performance characteristics in medical equipment on board aircraft at altitude; and 5) cabin space limitations and G forces pose special occupational safety and health implications for nurses. Recommendations: 1) improve cabin crew training to include familiarization with medical equipment and the unique expertise emergency nurses can provide; 2) inform emergency nurses of the types and relative frequencies of in-flight medical emergencies, what to expect in the way of occupational safety and health issues in-flight, and how the cabin environment influences the functioning of medical equipment; 3) advise airlines that emergency nurses should have a higher profile in cabin crew training; and 4) conduct further research into the role of emergency nurses in clinical outcomes of in-flight medical emergencies. [Clinical Poster Presentation]</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T10:36:48Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T10:36:48Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
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