Polypharmacy drug interactions in the elderly who present to the emergency department

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/162946
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Polypharmacy drug interactions in the elderly who present to the emergency department
Abstract:
Polypharmacy drug interactions in the elderly who present to the emergency department
Conference Sponsor:Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Year:2002
Author:Presley, Diane, RN, MSN
P.I. Institution Name:Seton Medical Center
Contact Address:1201 W. 38th Street, Austin, TX, 78705, USA
Contact Telephone:(512) 324-1031
Co-Authors:Gail Robinson, RN, CEN
Purpose: Adverse drug events (ADEs) present challenging problems and increase the frequency of drug-related illnesses in the elderly. The purpose of this study is to discover the degree of polypharmacy ADEs leading to Emergency Department (ED) utilization and potential hospital admissions. ED nurses are well placed to screen at Triage and monitor patient responses to drugs. The number of elderly clients in most health care settings is increasing in direct proportion to our rapidly aging general population. Nurses need to recognize this population's special needs to deliver the appropriate scope of care for elderly patients. Methodology/Design: A retrospective chart review was performed on 150 randomly selected ED visits on patients 65 years of age or older between October 2001 - January 2002. ADEs were defined as any unfavorable medical event related to medication use or misuse. We also defined potential adverse drug reactions (PADRs) as a combination of medications that put the patient at risk for future ADEs. Setting: The study was conducted in a large urban ED Urgent Care Center in Central Texas, with 40,000 visits annually. Results: Out of the 150 patients selected, four were excluded due to medications not identified. There were 79 women and 71 men in this study. Ages ranged from 65 to 96. The average number of co-morbid conditions was three. Sixty percent of patients were taking at least one prescription and one over-the-counter medication daily, while 38% took 2-3, 44% took 405, and 18% took 6 or more. Eighteen percent of the ED visits were recognized by the Emergency Team as an ADE. The most frequently implicated classes of medications were anticoagulants, diuretics, antibiotics, hypoglycemics, beta and calcium blockers and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Conclusion: The frequent occurrence of clinically significant drug related events contribute to patient suffering, increased ED usage, and increased dollars spent on health care. For these reasons we believe incorporating this knowledge into practice will prepare ED nurses to act as change agents and also advocate for increased awareness and sensitivity of potential ADEs among all members of the health care team. [Research Poster Presentation]
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Emergency Nurses Association

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePolypharmacy drug interactions in the elderly who present to the emergency departmenten_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/162946-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Polypharmacy drug interactions in the elderly who present to the emergency department</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Emergency Nurses Association</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Presley, Diane, RN, MSN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Seton Medical Center</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">1201 W. 38th Street, Austin, TX, 78705, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">(512) 324-1031</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">Dpresley@seton.org</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Gail Robinson, RN, CEN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: Adverse drug events (ADEs) present challenging problems and increase the frequency of drug-related illnesses in the elderly. The purpose of this study is to discover the degree of polypharmacy ADEs leading to Emergency Department (ED) utilization and potential hospital admissions. ED nurses are well placed to screen at Triage and monitor patient responses to drugs. The number of elderly clients in most health care settings is increasing in direct proportion to our rapidly aging general population. Nurses need to recognize this population's special needs to deliver the appropriate scope of care for elderly patients. Methodology/Design: A retrospective chart review was performed on 150 randomly selected ED visits on patients 65 years of age or older between October 2001 - January 2002. ADEs were defined as any unfavorable medical event related to medication use or misuse. We also defined potential adverse drug reactions (PADRs) as a combination of medications that put the patient at risk for future ADEs. Setting: The study was conducted in a large urban ED Urgent Care Center in Central Texas, with 40,000 visits annually. Results: Out of the 150 patients selected, four were excluded due to medications not identified. There were 79 women and 71 men in this study. Ages ranged from 65 to 96. The average number of co-morbid conditions was three. Sixty percent of patients were taking at least one prescription and one over-the-counter medication daily, while 38% took 2-3, 44% took 405, and 18% took 6 or more. Eighteen percent of the ED visits were recognized by the Emergency Team as an ADE. The most frequently implicated classes of medications were anticoagulants, diuretics, antibiotics, hypoglycemics, beta and calcium blockers and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Conclusion: The frequent occurrence of clinically significant drug related events contribute to patient suffering, increased ED usage, and increased dollars spent on health care. For these reasons we believe incorporating this knowledge into practice will prepare ED nurses to act as change agents and also advocate for increased awareness and sensitivity of potential ADEs among all members of the health care team. [Research Poster Presentation]</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T10:36:53Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T10:36:53Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.