Violence in the workplace: The impact on nurses and nursing care in the emergency department

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/162948
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Violence in the workplace: The impact on nurses and nursing care in the emergency department
Abstract:
Violence in the workplace: The impact on nurses and nursing care in the emergency department
Conference Sponsor:Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Year:2002
Author:Rivero Early, Margaret, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Nevada, Reno
Contact Address:Orvis School of Nursing , Reno, NV, USA
Contact Telephone:(248) 370-4097
Purpose: Violence in the workplace is a growing area of concern to nurses. Emergency Department (ED) nurses are at risk for interpersonal violence from clients, and the impact of these experiences is not well understood. The literature suggests consequences of violence may include financial loss due to absenteeism and illness of nurses, and effects on nursing care of clients. The purpose of this study was to determine ED nurses' perceptions about interpersonal violence and any effects on nursing care, and what meanings they attach to these experiences. Design: An emergent design within a phenomenological framework was used. Setting: The study was conducted in a Level II metropolitan area hospital Emergency Department in the Midwest. Sample: After securing Institutional Review Board approval, a volunteer criterion sample was recruited. Eligibility criteria included willingness to participate in the study, employment as a Registered Nurse in the ED, and having experienced interpersonal violence while practicing nursing. Twelve nurses who met inclusion criteria agreed to be interviewed for this study. Methodology: Taped focused interviews were conducted at the informant's convenience in the ED. Informants were recruited until data saturation occurred. Results: Preliminary analysis of the transcribed interviews reveals emerging themes related to making sense of the violence, anger and frustration, effects on nursing care, administration's role, and relationships with peers and supervisors. The information gleaned will contribute to understanding the impact and potential implications of workplace interpersonal violence on ED nurses and nursing care, and will direct further research efforts. [Research Poster Presentation]
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Emergency Nurses Association

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleViolence in the workplace: The impact on nurses and nursing care in the emergency departmenten_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/162948-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Violence in the workplace: The impact on nurses and nursing care in the emergency department</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Emergency Nurses Association</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Rivero Early, Margaret, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Nevada, Reno</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Orvis School of Nursing , Reno, NV, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">(248) 370-4097</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: Violence in the workplace is a growing area of concern to nurses. Emergency Department (ED) nurses are at risk for interpersonal violence from clients, and the impact of these experiences is not well understood. The literature suggests consequences of violence may include financial loss due to absenteeism and illness of nurses, and effects on nursing care of clients. The purpose of this study was to determine ED nurses' perceptions about interpersonal violence and any effects on nursing care, and what meanings they attach to these experiences. Design: An emergent design within a phenomenological framework was used. Setting: The study was conducted in a Level II metropolitan area hospital Emergency Department in the Midwest. Sample: After securing Institutional Review Board approval, a volunteer criterion sample was recruited. Eligibility criteria included willingness to participate in the study, employment as a Registered Nurse in the ED, and having experienced interpersonal violence while practicing nursing. Twelve nurses who met inclusion criteria agreed to be interviewed for this study. Methodology: Taped focused interviews were conducted at the informant's convenience in the ED. Informants were recruited until data saturation occurred. Results: Preliminary analysis of the transcribed interviews reveals emerging themes related to making sense of the violence, anger and frustration, effects on nursing care, administration's role, and relationships with peers and supervisors. The information gleaned will contribute to understanding the impact and potential implications of workplace interpersonal violence on ED nurses and nursing care, and will direct further research efforts. [Research Poster Presentation]</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T10:36:55Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T10:36:55Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
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