2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/162951
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Role of Nurse Practitioners in Pediatric Emergency Departments
Abstract:
The Role of Nurse Practitioners in Pediatric Emergency Departments
Conference Sponsor:Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Year:2002
Author:Widecan, Michelle, RN, MSN, CPNP
P.I. Institution Name:Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center
Contact Address:3333 Burnet Avenue, Building C, 4th Floor, Cincinnati, OH, 45229 - 3039, USA
Contact Telephone:(513) 636-0461
Co-Authors:Richard Ruddy, MD
Purpose: Little could be found about the use of NPs in pediatric emergency departments. The purpose of this research project was to explore the role of the NP in pediatric emergency departments by identifying the type of pediatric emergency departments currently utilizing NPs, describing their role in pediatric emergency departments, and summarizing the barriers to practice of the NP in pediatric emergency departments. The theoretical framework used for the study was Change Theory. Design: A descriptive study design was used. Setting: The study was conducted by an RN completing the MSN program at the University of Cincinnati and employed by Emergency Services at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center. Sample: The sample included all pediatric emergency departments identified through the National Association of Children's Hospitals and Related Institutions (NACHRI). Hospitals without pediatric emergency departments were not included in the sample size. The sample size was 111. Methodology: A survey, designed to obtain pertinent information about how NPs are utilized in pediatric emergency departments, was mailed to 111 emergency department medical directors of NACHRI, due to their high level of credibility. Completion and return of the survey served as implied consent. Analysis of the data was done with descriptive statistics, frequencies and percentages, using SPSS. The surveys were assigned a number upon return for purpose of audits. Results: 87 surveys (78%) were returned. Forty-five percent were utilizing NPs and 55% were not. Over 60% of those not utilizing NPs would consider hiring in the future. The Midwest (27%) and Southwest (22%) utilized NPs the most in their pediatric EDs. Many were teaching hospitals, with fellowship and residence programs. Their roles in the pediatric ED included doing histories and physicals, ordering of diagnostic tests, diagnosing and management of minor illnesses and injuries along with other various duties. The top three barriers to practice identified were reimbursement (31.3%), scope of practice (20.1%), and prescriptive authority (15%). Conclusions: The data supports the use of NPs in pediatric emergency departments, and through the process described by Change Theory, NPs can act as change agents. [Research Paper Presentation]
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Emergency Nurses Association

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Role of Nurse Practitioners in Pediatric Emergency Departmentsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/162951-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Role of Nurse Practitioners in Pediatric Emergency Departments</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Emergency Nurses Association</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Widecan, Michelle, RN, MSN, CPNP</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">3333 Burnet Avenue, Building C, 4th Floor, Cincinnati, OH, 45229 - 3039, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">(513) 636-0461</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">wids7b@chmcc.org</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Richard Ruddy, MD</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: Little could be found about the use of NPs in pediatric emergency departments. The purpose of this research project was to explore the role of the NP in pediatric emergency departments by identifying the type of pediatric emergency departments currently utilizing NPs, describing their role in pediatric emergency departments, and summarizing the barriers to practice of the NP in pediatric emergency departments. The theoretical framework used for the study was Change Theory. Design: A descriptive study design was used. Setting: The study was conducted by an RN completing the MSN program at the University of Cincinnati and employed by Emergency Services at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center. Sample: The sample included all pediatric emergency departments identified through the National Association of Children's Hospitals and Related Institutions (NACHRI). Hospitals without pediatric emergency departments were not included in the sample size. The sample size was 111. Methodology: A survey, designed to obtain pertinent information about how NPs are utilized in pediatric emergency departments, was mailed to 111 emergency department medical directors of NACHRI, due to their high level of credibility. Completion and return of the survey served as implied consent. Analysis of the data was done with descriptive statistics, frequencies and percentages, using SPSS. The surveys were assigned a number upon return for purpose of audits. Results: 87 surveys (78%) were returned. Forty-five percent were utilizing NPs and 55% were not. Over 60% of those not utilizing NPs would consider hiring in the future. The Midwest (27%) and Southwest (22%) utilized NPs the most in their pediatric EDs. Many were teaching hospitals, with fellowship and residence programs. Their roles in the pediatric ED included doing histories and physicals, ordering of diagnostic tests, diagnosing and management of minor illnesses and injuries along with other various duties. The top three barriers to practice identified were reimbursement (31.3%), scope of practice (20.1%), and prescriptive authority (15%). Conclusions: The data supports the use of NPs in pediatric emergency departments, and through the process described by Change Theory, NPs can act as change agents. [Research Paper Presentation]</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T10:36:57Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T10:36:57Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
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