2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/162957
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The DOG BITES Program
Abstract:
The DOG BITES Program
Conference Sponsor:Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Year:2001
Author:Bernardo, Lisa Marie, RN, PhD, MPH
P.I. Institution Name:University of Pittsburgh, School of Nursing
Contact Address:415 Victoria Building, Pittsburgh, PA, 15261, USA
Contact Telephone:(412) 624-7637
Co-Authors:Mary Jane Gardner, RN; Joan B. O' Dair, RN, MSW, MPH; Beth Cohen, RN, BSN; Joseph Lucke, PhD; and Raymond Pitetti, MD, MPH
Clinical Topic: The goals of our interdisciplinary project, Documentation Of Growls and Bites In The Emergency Setting (DOG BITES) Program were to: 1) provide ongoing education to ED staff at Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh (CHP) for documenting and reporting child, dog and environment data in dog bite-related injuries, and 2) evaluate the effectiveness of this ongoing education on ED record documentation and mandated health department reporting through active surveillance from January-December, 2000. Our previous research at CHP found a lack of documenting dog bit data and an under-reporting of dog bites to the county health Department. Our objectives were: 1) as compared to 1999, there will be a 50% increase in our compliance with documenting child, dog and environment data on our ED records, and 2) compared to 1999, there would be a 50% increase in the number of ED patients reported to the county health department for dog bites. We chose 50% as a reasonable target for improvement. Implementations: A 30-minutes orientation was provided to ED staff in January, 2000, that focused on results of our previous research, the program purpose, methods and outcomes. Study team members retrospectively abstracted child, dog and environment data from ED records (n=175) for 1999. The same data were prospectively abstracted from ED records in 2000 (n=211). Data were compared monthly between years and within years. Dog bites reported to the county health department were matched with ED patient records. Bi-monthly reports were shared with the ED staff illustrating compliance with documentation and reporting between years and within years. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics. Outcomes: From 1999-2000, an overall improvement in ED documentation was found, with calculated compliance percentages ranging from 3% to 32%. A 14% increase was found in reporting dog bites to the local health department. ED staff reported satisfaction with the program?s variety of education methods. Recommendations: Active surveillance is an appropriate method for comparing trends in documenting dog bite-related data on ED records and reporting these patients to the health department. The improvement in ED documentation was below the targeted objective, and may have required alternative education strategies or changes in the ED patient record. The improvement in health department reporting was small, and methods to improve compliance are being explored. The DOG BITES Program methods can be used to improve documenting and reporting dog bites or other patient conditions. Upon completion of this poster review, the participant will be able to: 1) Describe the purpose of the DOG BITES program; and 2) Develop a DOG BITES program in their ED. [Clinical Poster Presentation]
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Emergency Nurses Association

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe DOG BITES Programen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/162957-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The DOG BITES Program</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Emergency Nurses Association</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Bernardo, Lisa Marie, RN, PhD, MPH</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Pittsburgh, School of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">415 Victoria Building, Pittsburgh, PA, 15261, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">(412) 624-7637</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">LBE100@pitt.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Mary Jane Gardner, RN; Joan B. O' Dair, RN, MSW, MPH; Beth Cohen, RN, BSN; Joseph Lucke, PhD; and Raymond Pitetti, MD, MPH</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Clinical Topic: The goals of our interdisciplinary project, Documentation Of Growls and Bites In The Emergency Setting (DOG BITES) Program were to: 1) provide ongoing education to ED staff at Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh (CHP) for documenting and reporting child, dog and environment data in dog bite-related injuries, and 2) evaluate the effectiveness of this ongoing education on ED record documentation and mandated health department reporting through active surveillance from January-December, 2000. Our previous research at CHP found a lack of documenting dog bit data and an under-reporting of dog bites to the county health Department. Our objectives were: 1) as compared to 1999, there will be a 50% increase in our compliance with documenting child, dog and environment data on our ED records, and 2) compared to 1999, there would be a 50% increase in the number of ED patients reported to the county health department for dog bites. We chose 50% as a reasonable target for improvement. Implementations: A 30-minutes orientation was provided to ED staff in January, 2000, that focused on results of our previous research, the program purpose, methods and outcomes. Study team members retrospectively abstracted child, dog and environment data from ED records (n=175) for 1999. The same data were prospectively abstracted from ED records in 2000 (n=211). Data were compared monthly between years and within years. Dog bites reported to the county health department were matched with ED patient records. Bi-monthly reports were shared with the ED staff illustrating compliance with documentation and reporting between years and within years. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics. Outcomes: From 1999-2000, an overall improvement in ED documentation was found, with calculated compliance percentages ranging from 3% to 32%. A 14% increase was found in reporting dog bites to the local health department. ED staff reported satisfaction with the program?s variety of education methods. Recommendations: Active surveillance is an appropriate method for comparing trends in documenting dog bite-related data on ED records and reporting these patients to the health department. The improvement in ED documentation was below the targeted objective, and may have required alternative education strategies or changes in the ED patient record. The improvement in health department reporting was small, and methods to improve compliance are being explored. The DOG BITES Program methods can be used to improve documenting and reporting dog bites or other patient conditions. Upon completion of this poster review, the participant will be able to: 1) Describe the purpose of the DOG BITES program; and 2) Develop a DOG BITES program in their ED. [Clinical Poster Presentation]</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T10:37:05Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T10:37:05Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
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