2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/162962
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Family Stressors and Childhood Accidental Poisoning
Abstract:
Family Stressors and Childhood Accidental Poisoning
Conference Sponsor:Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Year:2001
Author:Hauburger, Noreen, RN, MS, APN-C, CEN
P.I. Institution Name:Hackensack University Medical Center
Contact Address:30 Prospect Avenue, Hackensack, NJ, 07601, USA
Contact Telephone:(201) 996-5456
Purpose: Each year, more than one million children unintentionally poison themselves. Most of the current research on Accidental Childhood Poisoning (ACP) is related to the diagnosis and treatment of poisoning. More research is needed to explore the etiology of ACP. It is believed that family stressors produce tension. This tension within the family may lead to lack of supervision of the child by the parent, thus allowing for an ACP to occur. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to identify family stressors (FS) that may precede an ACP. Design: A cross-sectional, correlation design was used. Setting: The study was conducted at a Poison Control Center with a catchment population of 3.6 million people from rural, urban and suburban areas. Sample: Forty parents whose child was under 6 years of age and had an ACP were interviewed. The children were typically male (n-22), 26.6 months old (range 8-72 months), the youngest child (n-20), within a household of 1 to 5 children (mean=2), and from a two-parent family (n-37). The mother (n-31) was most likely to be interviewed. Methodology: Parents who called the PCC for an ACP were called back 30 to 60 minutes after the ACP. Demographic data was collected and families were assessed for family stressors (FS) with McCubbin?s (1983) Family Inventory of Life Events and Changes (FILE) in a 5 to 7 minute interview. Results: The family stressors that preceded the ACP: 1) increase in the amount of ?outside activities? of the children (65%); 2) family purchase of a car or other major item (43%); 3) a job promotion (38%); 4) an increase in chores that do not get done (30%); 5) birth of a child (25%); 6) an increase in father?s time away from family (23%); and 7) increased financial strain (23%). Most of the family stressors identified were supported by earlier research studies. An analysis of family stressors and demographic data revealed a relationship between the family stressor of a child changing to a new school and the child?s age (p=.01), the number of children and family members per household (p=.001). There was also a correlation between an older child who accidentally poisoned him/her and the family stress of a newborn in the home. Conclusion: The outcomes of this study could aid in the identification of significant family stress factors for future studies of ACP which could then provide assessment data for emergency nurses to use in cases of ACP. Upon completion of this poster review, the participant will be able to: 1) Identify three family stressors that may precede an accidental childhood poisoning (ACP); and 2) Describe how family stressors may lead to an ACP. [Research Poster Presentation]
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Emergency Nurses Association

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleFamily Stressors and Childhood Accidental Poisoningen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/162962-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Family Stressors and Childhood Accidental Poisoning</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Emergency Nurses Association</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Hauburger, Noreen, RN, MS, APN-C, CEN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Hackensack University Medical Center</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">30 Prospect Avenue, Hackensack, NJ, 07601, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">(201) 996-5456</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">Nhauburger@humed.com</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: Each year, more than one million children unintentionally poison themselves. Most of the current research on Accidental Childhood Poisoning (ACP) is related to the diagnosis and treatment of poisoning. More research is needed to explore the etiology of ACP. It is believed that family stressors produce tension. This tension within the family may lead to lack of supervision of the child by the parent, thus allowing for an ACP to occur. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to identify family stressors (FS) that may precede an ACP. Design: A cross-sectional, correlation design was used. Setting: The study was conducted at a Poison Control Center with a catchment population of 3.6 million people from rural, urban and suburban areas. Sample: Forty parents whose child was under 6 years of age and had an ACP were interviewed. The children were typically male (n-22), 26.6 months old (range 8-72 months), the youngest child (n-20), within a household of 1 to 5 children (mean=2), and from a two-parent family (n-37). The mother (n-31) was most likely to be interviewed. Methodology: Parents who called the PCC for an ACP were called back 30 to 60 minutes after the ACP. Demographic data was collected and families were assessed for family stressors (FS) with McCubbin?s (1983) Family Inventory of Life Events and Changes (FILE) in a 5 to 7 minute interview. Results: The family stressors that preceded the ACP: 1) increase in the amount of ?outside activities? of the children (65%); 2) family purchase of a car or other major item (43%); 3) a job promotion (38%); 4) an increase in chores that do not get done (30%); 5) birth of a child (25%); 6) an increase in father?s time away from family (23%); and 7) increased financial strain (23%). Most of the family stressors identified were supported by earlier research studies. An analysis of family stressors and demographic data revealed a relationship between the family stressor of a child changing to a new school and the child?s age (p=.01), the number of children and family members per household (p=.001). There was also a correlation between an older child who accidentally poisoned him/her and the family stress of a newborn in the home. Conclusion: The outcomes of this study could aid in the identification of significant family stress factors for future studies of ACP which could then provide assessment data for emergency nurses to use in cases of ACP. Upon completion of this poster review, the participant will be able to: 1) Identify three family stressors that may precede an accidental childhood poisoning (ACP); and 2) Describe how family stressors may lead to an ACP. [Research Poster Presentation]</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T10:37:10Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T10:37:10Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.