Alcohol Use Among Subcritical Emergency Department Patients: Assessment, Intervention, and Referral

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/162963
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Alcohol Use Among Subcritical Emergency Department Patients: Assessment, Intervention, and Referral
Abstract:
Alcohol Use Among Subcritical Emergency Department Patients: Assessment, Intervention, and Referral
Conference Sponsor:Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Year:2001
Author:McCurren, Cynthia, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Louisville, School of Nursing
Contact Address:, Louisville, KY, 40292, USA
Contact Telephone:(502) 852-5366
Co-Authors:Ashlee A. Miller BSN, RN; J. Celeste Kallenborn, BSN, RN; Timothy G. Price, MD; and John Rhodes, MD
Purpose: A high rate of hazardous/harmful drinking behaviors (15-31%) has been reported among subcritical* ED patients leading to significant economic cost and human suffering. There is however, a general lack of screening, problem recognition, and referral. An assessment and brief intervention (BI) implemented during an ED visit might prove useful in reducing the likelihood of further risk from alcohol ingestion. This pilot study tested the feasibility of subject recruitment/retention, and an assessment, intervention, and referral protocol for use in a larger study. Design: A descriptive, prospective design was used. Setting: This study was conducted in a university hospital ED located in the southeast (35,000 average visits/year and the region's only Level I Trauma Center). Sample: Inclusion criteria were: 1) age > 18 years; 2) no hospitalization required; 3) intact hearing and cognition; and 4) English speaking. A convenience sample of 35 ED patients was recruited. The mean age was 37.94 years (SD = 10.53); 17 were African-Americans and 18 Caucasians; and the majority were male (n=22) and not married (n=22). Methodology: The scope of the study was explained and informed consent was obtained. Subjects were assessed using the Five Shot Questionnaire (FSQ), a five-item instrument (score range 0-7): reported sensitivity 96%, specificity 76%, and overall accuracy 78%. A score of >2.5 indicates hazardous/harmful drinking. Those scoring >2.5 received a five-minute BI focused on raising problem awareness and advising change. Information on treatment programs was provided. A letter with similar information was mailed within seven days. A phone call was attempted after one month to assess frequency/amount of alcohol consumption; occurrence of accidents/hospital visits or social problems related to alcohol use; and involvement with any alcohol treatment program since the intervention. Results: Nineteen of the 35 (54%) scored >2.5 on the FSQ (mean = 4.68, SD=1.31). Of 19 letters mailed, only one was returned undeliverable. Five (26%) were reached by follow-up phone calls. Among these, none had been re-hospitalized or in an accident; no one was in a treatment program; one had experienced family complaints; and one had reduced alcohol consumption. FSQ item analysis was completed. Conclusions: The extent of the problem was reaffirmed with 54% having problem drinking behaviors. Subject recruitment was not difficult. The FSQ performed well for assessment. Follow-up was problematic; a monetary incentive is planned. Upon completion of this poster review, the participant will be able to: 1) Explain the significance of alcohol use among subcritical ED patients; 2) Describe one method for screening for hazardous/harmful drinking among subcritical ED patients; and 3) Discuss the outcomes of an intervention/referral protocol used among subcritical ED patients. * patients not requiring hospital admission for management of the injury/illness [Research Poster Presentation]
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Emergency Nurses Association

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAlcohol Use Among Subcritical Emergency Department Patients: Assessment, Intervention, and Referralen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/162963-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Alcohol Use Among Subcritical Emergency Department Patients: Assessment, Intervention, and Referral</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Emergency Nurses Association</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">McCurren, Cynthia, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Louisville, School of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">, Louisville, KY, 40292, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">(502) 852-5366</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">camccu01@gwise.louisville.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Ashlee A. Miller BSN, RN; J. Celeste Kallenborn, BSN, RN; Timothy G. Price, MD; and John Rhodes, MD</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: A high rate of hazardous/harmful drinking behaviors (15-31%) has been reported among subcritical* ED patients leading to significant economic cost and human suffering. There is however, a general lack of screening, problem recognition, and referral. An assessment and brief intervention (BI) implemented during an ED visit might prove useful in reducing the likelihood of further risk from alcohol ingestion. This pilot study tested the feasibility of subject recruitment/retention, and an assessment, intervention, and referral protocol for use in a larger study. Design: A descriptive, prospective design was used. Setting: This study was conducted in a university hospital ED located in the southeast (35,000 average visits/year and the region's only Level I Trauma Center). Sample: Inclusion criteria were: 1) age &gt; 18 years; 2) no hospitalization required; 3) intact hearing and cognition; and 4) English speaking. A convenience sample of 35 ED patients was recruited. The mean age was 37.94 years (SD = 10.53); 17 were African-Americans and 18 Caucasians; and the majority were male (n=22) and not married (n=22). Methodology: The scope of the study was explained and informed consent was obtained. Subjects were assessed using the Five Shot Questionnaire (FSQ), a five-item instrument (score range 0-7): reported sensitivity 96%, specificity 76%, and overall accuracy 78%. A score of &gt;2.5 indicates hazardous/harmful drinking. Those scoring &gt;2.5 received a five-minute BI focused on raising problem awareness and advising change. Information on treatment programs was provided. A letter with similar information was mailed within seven days. A phone call was attempted after one month to assess frequency/amount of alcohol consumption; occurrence of accidents/hospital visits or social problems related to alcohol use; and involvement with any alcohol treatment program since the intervention. Results: Nineteen of the 35 (54%) scored &gt;2.5 on the FSQ (mean = 4.68, SD=1.31). Of 19 letters mailed, only one was returned undeliverable. Five (26%) were reached by follow-up phone calls. Among these, none had been re-hospitalized or in an accident; no one was in a treatment program; one had experienced family complaints; and one had reduced alcohol consumption. FSQ item analysis was completed. Conclusions: The extent of the problem was reaffirmed with 54% having problem drinking behaviors. Subject recruitment was not difficult. The FSQ performed well for assessment. Follow-up was problematic; a monetary incentive is planned. Upon completion of this poster review, the participant will be able to: 1) Explain the significance of alcohol use among subcritical ED patients; 2) Describe one method for screening for hazardous/harmful drinking among subcritical ED patients; and 3) Discuss the outcomes of an intervention/referral protocol used among subcritical ED patients. * patients not requiring hospital admission for management of the injury/illness [Research Poster Presentation]</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T10:37:11Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T10:37:11Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
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