Assessing the Needs of Family Members Who Accompany the Adult Patient to the Emergency Department

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/162966
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Assessing the Needs of Family Members Who Accompany the Adult Patient to the Emergency Department
Abstract:
Assessing the Needs of Family Members Who Accompany the Adult Patient to the Emergency Department
Conference Sponsor:Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Year:2005
Author:DuBrueler, Janice S., DNSc, RN, ACLS, TNCC
P.I. Institution Name:Shenandoah University
Title:Assistant Professor of Nursing, Shenandoah University
Contact Address:1778 North Sector Court, Winchester, VA, 22601, USA
Contact Telephone:(540) 665-5504
Purpose: The family of a patient in the emergency department plays a major role in the support and care of the patient whether he or she is admitted or discharged. The purpose of this study was to assess the needs of family members who accompany patients to the emergency department (ED) and describe the relationship between characteristics of the patient's visit and characteristics of family members. Specifically, the study focused on the patient's triage acuity level and length of stay, as well as the family members' age, education level, socioeconomic status, and physical and psychosocial needs. In addition, this study sought to validate family members' experiences by defining common themes related to their ED experience. Design: The study was a descriptive, correlational design, using quantitative and qualitative methods.
Setting: Data collection occurred in a large, regional, Level II Trauma Center serving an urban population in the mid-Atlantic area of the United States. Sample: The quantitative phase of the study included 70 family members designated by ED patients. The qualitative phase of the study included ten family members, a subset of the 70 participants, who volunteered to be interviewed. Full institutional review board approval was obtained. Methodology: Six instruments were used in the study: (1) personal profile forms for both the patient and family; (2) a five-level triage acuity rating scale; (3) Hollingshead's Two Factor Index of Social Position; (4) an adapted version of the Critical Care Family Needs Inventory (CCFNI) for ED families; and (5) a semi-structured interview guide that was based on the five dimensions of the CCFNI. All qualitative interviews were tape-recorded and transcribed verbatim. Factor analysis of the adapted CCFNI identified the five dimensions of family needs present in the original instrument: information, comfort, proximity, assurance, and support. The adapted CCFNI was found to have high reliability with a Cronbach's alpha of 0.93. Results: The needs that family members ranked as having most priority were related to the dimensions of information and proximity. Family members noted the following needs as most important: knowledge of how the patient is being treated medically; assurance that the patient is receiving the best possible care; and clear explanations from health care providers. No significant correlations were identified between the dimensions of needs and triage acuity level, family member's education level, and length of stay. Results showed a significant correlation between the dimension of proximity and family member age (p = .05). A significant relationship was also identified between the family member's social position and the dimensions of support (p = .02) and comfort (p = .02). Qualitative data reinforced the order of importance of the five dimensions of family needs identified in the quantitative phase and provided additional details related to family needs. Conclusions: The results of this study identified the most important needs of family members who accompanied their loved ones to the emergency department. Because it is often the family who is responsible for the discharge care of the patient, policy development related to patient care should take a family-centered approach.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Emergency Nurses Association

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAssessing the Needs of Family Members Who Accompany the Adult Patient to the Emergency Departmenten_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/162966-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Assessing the Needs of Family Members Who Accompany the Adult Patient to the Emergency Department</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Emergency Nurses Association</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">DuBrueler, Janice S., DNSc, RN, ACLS, TNCC</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Shenandoah University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor of Nursing, Shenandoah University</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">1778 North Sector Court, Winchester, VA, 22601, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">(540) 665-5504</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jdubruel@su.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: The family of a patient in the emergency department plays a major role in the support and care of the patient whether he or she is admitted or discharged. The purpose of this study was to assess the needs of family members who accompany patients to the emergency department (ED) and describe the relationship between characteristics of the patient's visit and characteristics of family members. Specifically, the study focused on the patient's triage acuity level and length of stay, as well as the family members' age, education level, socioeconomic status, and physical and psychosocial needs. In addition, this study sought to validate family members' experiences by defining common themes related to their ED experience. Design: The study was a descriptive, correlational design, using quantitative and qualitative methods. <br/>Setting: Data collection occurred in a large, regional, Level II Trauma Center serving an urban population in the mid-Atlantic area of the United States. Sample: The quantitative phase of the study included 70 family members designated by ED patients. The qualitative phase of the study included ten family members, a subset of the 70 participants, who volunteered to be interviewed. Full institutional review board approval was obtained. Methodology: Six instruments were used in the study: (1) personal profile forms for both the patient and family; (2) a five-level triage acuity rating scale; (3) Hollingshead's Two Factor Index of Social Position; (4) an adapted version of the Critical Care Family Needs Inventory (CCFNI) for ED families; and (5) a semi-structured interview guide that was based on the five dimensions of the CCFNI. All qualitative interviews were tape-recorded and transcribed verbatim. Factor analysis of the adapted CCFNI identified the five dimensions of family needs present in the original instrument: information, comfort, proximity, assurance, and support. The adapted CCFNI was found to have high reliability with a Cronbach's alpha of 0.93. Results: The needs that family members ranked as having most priority were related to the dimensions of information and proximity. Family members noted the following needs as most important: knowledge of how the patient is being treated medically; assurance that the patient is receiving the best possible care; and clear explanations from health care providers. No significant correlations were identified between the dimensions of needs and triage acuity level, family member's education level, and length of stay. Results showed a significant correlation between the dimension of proximity and family member age (p = .05). A significant relationship was also identified between the family member's social position and the dimensions of support (p = .02) and comfort (p = .02). Qualitative data reinforced the order of importance of the five dimensions of family needs identified in the quantitative phase and provided additional details related to family needs. Conclusions: The results of this study identified the most important needs of family members who accompanied their loved ones to the emergency department. Because it is often the family who is responsible for the discharge care of the patient, policy development related to patient care should take a family-centered approach.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T10:37:14Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T10:37:14Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
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