Choosing to Care: Male and Female Nurse Experiences of Comforting Patients in the Emergency Department

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/162969
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Choosing to Care: Male and Female Nurse Experiences of Comforting Patients in the Emergency Department
Abstract:
Choosing to Care: Male and Female Nurse Experiences of Comforting Patients in the Emergency Department
Conference Sponsor:Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Year:2005
Author:Herterich, Lisa B., MSN, RN, CEN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Texas at Tyler
Title:Senior Lecturer
Contact Address:3201 N. Eastman Road, Longview, TX, 75605, USA
Contact Telephone:(903) 663-8230
Purpose: The concept of comfort is essential to the caring process. Comfort provides a sense of ease and well-being, both physically and psychologically, and is necessary throughout life. This qualitative study used a grounded theory methodology to explore nurse self-awareness of individual comforting styles in the emergency department (ED) setting. Possible gender differences were explored by comparing male and female accounts of their individual comforting values and behaviors. A review of the literature focused on the concepts of caring and comfort and how they affect the work of ED nurses. Through this study and the use of Jean Watson's Theory of Human Caring and Katherine Kolcaba's Comfort Theory as theoretical frameworks, an emerging theory of comfort evolved specific to ED nursing. Design: This was a qualitative study that used a grounded theory approach. Setting: The study was conducted with ED nurses who work at a Level II Trauma Center emergency department in eastern Texas that sees approximately 70,000 patients per year. Sample: Four male and four female registered nurses with ED nursing experience ranging from one year to fourteen years were recruited into the study. Six of the participants had only ED experience while two of the participants had experience in other nursing areas. Methodology: Participation was voluntary and informed consent was obtained prior to the interview process. Face-to-face interviews were conducted in a private setting. Each interview began with the grand tour question: "Tell me how you feel about comforting patients in the emergency department?" Subsequent questions were used as new information emerged through the constant comparative data analysis process. Interviews were transcribed verbatim by the researcher and data saturation was reached after eight interviews. Data analysis was confirmed by an expert nurse researcher. Results: Four major themes emerged through data analysis: Nurse Characteristics, Process of Assessing Comfort, Comfort Consequences, and Nurse Evaluation. The Basic Social Process that emerged is that ED nurses choose, either consciously or unconsciously, to provide comfort care to their patients in varying degrees. Specific male and female comforting traits were also identified. Conclusions: Further research is needed to examine each of the individual themes and to test the theory of caring that emerged. In addition, careful examination of gender differences and comforting traits would be beneficial. Study findings offer the hope that nurses can be more consciously aware of the choices they make in providing patient care and comfort so that an atmosphere of healing and concern may prevail in the stressful ED environment.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Emergency Nurses Association

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleChoosing to Care: Male and Female Nurse Experiences of Comforting Patients in the Emergency Departmenten_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/162969-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Choosing to Care: Male and Female Nurse Experiences of Comforting Patients in the Emergency Department</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Emergency Nurses Association</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Herterich, Lisa B., MSN, RN, CEN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Texas at Tyler</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Senior Lecturer</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">3201 N. Eastman Road, Longview, TX, 75605, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">(903) 663-8230</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">lherterich@mail.uttyl.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: The concept of comfort is essential to the caring process. Comfort provides a sense of ease and well-being, both physically and psychologically, and is necessary throughout life. This qualitative study used a grounded theory methodology to explore nurse self-awareness of individual comforting styles in the emergency department (ED) setting. Possible gender differences were explored by comparing male and female accounts of their individual comforting values and behaviors. A review of the literature focused on the concepts of caring and comfort and how they affect the work of ED nurses. Through this study and the use of Jean Watson's Theory of Human Caring and Katherine Kolcaba's Comfort Theory as theoretical frameworks, an emerging theory of comfort evolved specific to ED nursing. Design: This was a qualitative study that used a grounded theory approach. Setting: The study was conducted with ED nurses who work at a Level II Trauma Center emergency department in eastern Texas that sees approximately 70,000 patients per year. Sample: Four male and four female registered nurses with ED nursing experience ranging from one year to fourteen years were recruited into the study. Six of the participants had only ED experience while two of the participants had experience in other nursing areas. Methodology: Participation was voluntary and informed consent was obtained prior to the interview process. Face-to-face interviews were conducted in a private setting. Each interview began with the grand tour question: &quot;Tell me how you feel about comforting patients in the emergency department?&quot; Subsequent questions were used as new information emerged through the constant comparative data analysis process. Interviews were transcribed verbatim by the researcher and data saturation was reached after eight interviews. Data analysis was confirmed by an expert nurse researcher. Results: Four major themes emerged through data analysis: Nurse Characteristics, Process of Assessing Comfort, Comfort Consequences, and Nurse Evaluation. The Basic Social Process that emerged is that ED nurses choose, either consciously or unconsciously, to provide comfort care to their patients in varying degrees. Specific male and female comforting traits were also identified. Conclusions: Further research is needed to examine each of the individual themes and to test the theory of caring that emerged. In addition, careful examination of gender differences and comforting traits would be beneficial. Study findings offer the hope that nurses can be more consciously aware of the choices they make in providing patient care and comfort so that an atmosphere of healing and concern may prevail in the stressful ED environment.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T10:37:17Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T10:37:17Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
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