2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/162973
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Violence Against Workers in the Emergency Department
Abstract:
Violence Against Workers in the Emergency Department
Conference Sponsor:Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Year:2005
Author:McQueen, Lisa, MSN, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Northern Kentucky University
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:Nunn Drive, Highland Heights, KY, 41099, USA
Contact Telephone:(859) 572-6342
Co-Authors:Donna Gates, EdD, FAAN, RN; Clara S. Ross, MD
Purpose: Emergency Department (ED) workers are at risk of violence due to the increased numbers of patients and visitors under the influence of drugs and/or alcohol or with psychiatric disorders or dementia. In addition, a presence of weapons in the emergency department, a stressful ED environment, and a flow of violence from the community may contribute to violence in the emergency department. The purpose of this study was to survey ED workers about the violence they experience from patients and visitors. Design: This was a descriptive survey study. Setting: The study took place at five hospitals in the Midwest. Two were located in urban areas, and three were suburban hospitals. One of the urban hospitals was a teaching, Level I Trauma Center. Sample: The study population included 600 ED workers who worked at least 8 hours per month and interacted with patients and/or visitors. The population included nurses, physicians, paramedics, physician assistants, social workers, patient care assistants, unit and registration clerks, schedulers, and patient representatives. Methodology: The researchers contacted ED managers at each hospital to obtain an anonymous list of workers. A 31-item survey that included multiple-choice, open-ended, and Likert-type items was developed by the researchers. Study variables included frequency of assaults, verbal and sexual harassments, and verbal threats during the previous six months; reporting frequency; worker injuries; lost workdays; prevention training; and assault risk factors. Content validity was established using ED nurses as experts. After obtaining approval from each hospital?s institutional review board, anonymous surveys and consent letters were distributed to employee mailboxes. ED workers were instructed to place completed surveys in data collection boxes that were located in each emergency department. A reminder flyer was posted in ED break rooms at each facility to increase response rate. Results: Two hundred forty-two surveys were returned (response rate = 40%). In relation to violence from patients, 94% of respondents reported being verbally harassed, 66% reported being verbally threatened, 48% reported being assaulted, and 39% reported being sexually harassed. Sixty-five percent of those assaulted never formally reported the incident. Sixty-three percent of respondents had no violence prevention training within the previous year. Alcohol and drug use by patients were the most frequently cited risk factors for assault as perceived by respondents. Conclusions: Results of this study confirm that the ED workplace poses a risk for violence to ED workers. Prevention efforts need to include education, security, environmental controls, and violence prevention policies. Reporting is needed to document risk factors and plan appropriate interventions. Research is needed to evaluate violence prevention strategies.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Emergency Nurses Association

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleViolence Against Workers in the Emergency Departmenten_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/162973-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Violence Against Workers in the Emergency Department</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Emergency Nurses Association</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">McQueen, Lisa, MSN, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Northern Kentucky University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Nunn Drive, Highland Heights, KY, 41099, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">(859) 572-6342</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">mcqueenl1@nku.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Donna Gates, EdD, FAAN, RN; Clara S. Ross, MD<br/></td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: Emergency Department (ED) workers are at risk of violence due to the increased numbers of patients and visitors under the influence of drugs and/or alcohol or with psychiatric disorders or dementia. In addition, a presence of weapons in the emergency department, a stressful ED environment, and a flow of violence from the community may contribute to violence in the emergency department. The purpose of this study was to survey ED workers about the violence they experience from patients and visitors. Design: This was a descriptive survey study. Setting: The study took place at five hospitals in the Midwest. Two were located in urban areas, and three were suburban hospitals. One of the urban hospitals was a teaching, Level I Trauma Center. Sample: The study population included 600 ED workers who worked at least 8 hours per month and interacted with patients and/or visitors. The population included nurses, physicians, paramedics, physician assistants, social workers, patient care assistants, unit and registration clerks, schedulers, and patient representatives. Methodology: The researchers contacted ED managers at each hospital to obtain an anonymous list of workers. A 31-item survey that included multiple-choice, open-ended, and Likert-type items was developed by the researchers. Study variables included frequency of assaults, verbal and sexual harassments, and verbal threats during the previous six months; reporting frequency; worker injuries; lost workdays; prevention training; and assault risk factors. Content validity was established using ED nurses as experts. After obtaining approval from each hospital?s institutional review board, anonymous surveys and consent letters were distributed to employee mailboxes. ED workers were instructed to place completed surveys in data collection boxes that were located in each emergency department. A reminder flyer was posted in ED break rooms at each facility to increase response rate. Results: Two hundred forty-two surveys were returned (response rate = 40%). In relation to violence from patients, 94% of respondents reported being verbally harassed, 66% reported being verbally threatened, 48% reported being assaulted, and 39% reported being sexually harassed. Sixty-five percent of those assaulted never formally reported the incident. Sixty-three percent of respondents had no violence prevention training within the previous year. Alcohol and drug use by patients were the most frequently cited risk factors for assault as perceived by respondents. Conclusions: Results of this study confirm that the ED workplace poses a risk for violence to ED workers. Prevention efforts need to include education, security, environmental controls, and violence prevention policies. Reporting is needed to document risk factors and plan appropriate interventions. Research is needed to evaluate violence prevention strategies.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T10:37:21Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T10:37:21Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
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