2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/162975
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Horse-related Injuries and Deaths in Western Montana
Abstract:
Horse-related Injuries and Deaths in Western Montana
Conference Sponsor:Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Year:2005
Author:Smith Otoupalik, Shelley, RN, MSN, CEN, CFRN, FNP (S), NREMT-P
P.I. Institution Name:St. Patrick Hospital
Title:Trauma Nurse Practitioner
Contact Address:500 W. Broadway, Missoula, MT, 59806, USA
Contact Telephone:(406) 329-2736
Co-Authors:John Bleicher, RN; Britney Matheson PA-C; Bobbi Perkins; J. Brad Pickhardt MD, FACS; Hannah Parsons PA(S)
Purpose: Horses and horse-related activities are engrained in the lifestyle of Montana and the western United States. Thousands of people interact with horses daily and injuries occur. The severity of these injuries range from minor cuts and scrapes to severe head and neck injuries resulting in long-term disability and/or death. These injuries are often treated in the emergency department. The purpose of this study was to identify the number, type, severity, and cause of horse-related injuries and deaths in emergency departments of western Montana and northern Idaho with the goal of incorporating this information into an equestrian injury prevention program. Design: A descriptive study design was utilized. Setting: This study gathered information on victims of horse-related incidents at 16 hospitals in western Montana and 1 hospital in northern Idaho.
Sample: Any patient presenting to the emergency department (ED) of the participating hospitals with an injury resulting from a horse-related incident between the dates of April 15, 2002 and April 15, 2004 was included in the study. Methodology: A 12-item questionnaire, completed by the primary emergency health care provider at the time of admission to the emergency department, included demographics, mode of arrival, cause of injuries, type of injuries, severity of injuries, and disposition. Data were compiled and analyzed by a multi-disciplinary team comprised of a trauma surgeon, a trauma coordinator, a trauma registrar, a trauma physician assistant, and a trauma nurse practitioner. Results: There were 617 patients with 879 documented injuries included in the study. The most common injury was extremity injury (36%) followed by head/neck (26%), chest (20%), pelvis (10%), and abdomen (5%). Of the 617 patients included in the study, there were 3 (0.5%) deaths. The average injury severity score (ISS) for patients who died was 59.7. A quarter of the patients involved in the study sustained injuries that resulted in hospitalization. Ninety-two percent (n = 568) of the study sample wore no type of protective equipment such as a helmet or Kevlar vest. Conclusions: Horse-related injuries comprise a significant number of ED visits in western Montana. Velocity of travel, height of patient off the ground, and unpredictability of animals all lend themselves to several types of injuries: high-speed decelerating injuries, blunt trauma, penetrating trauma, and dragging-type injuries that range from minor to mortal. Little attention has been paid to the cause and prevention of these injuries. Protective equipment is under-utilized by most riders. Injury prevention programs stressing the potential severity of injury and the benefits of protective equipment must be made available to equestrians. Further investigation into the cause and prevention of equestrian accidents is needed.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Emergency Nurses Association

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHorse-related Injuries and Deaths in Western Montanaen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/162975-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Horse-related Injuries and Deaths in Western Montana</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Emergency Nurses Association</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Smith Otoupalik, Shelley, RN, MSN, CEN, CFRN, FNP (S), NREMT-P</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">St. Patrick Hospital</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Trauma Nurse Practitioner</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">500 W. Broadway, Missoula, MT, 59806, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">(406) 329-2736</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">sotoupalik@yahoo.com</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">John Bleicher, RN; Britney Matheson PA-C; Bobbi Perkins; J. Brad Pickhardt MD, FACS; Hannah Parsons PA(S)<br/></td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: Horses and horse-related activities are engrained in the lifestyle of Montana and the western United States. Thousands of people interact with horses daily and injuries occur. The severity of these injuries range from minor cuts and scrapes to severe head and neck injuries resulting in long-term disability and/or death. These injuries are often treated in the emergency department. The purpose of this study was to identify the number, type, severity, and cause of horse-related injuries and deaths in emergency departments of western Montana and northern Idaho with the goal of incorporating this information into an equestrian injury prevention program. Design: A descriptive study design was utilized. Setting: This study gathered information on victims of horse-related incidents at 16 hospitals in western Montana and 1 hospital in northern Idaho. <br/>Sample: Any patient presenting to the emergency department (ED) of the participating hospitals with an injury resulting from a horse-related incident between the dates of April 15, 2002 and April 15, 2004 was included in the study. Methodology: A 12-item questionnaire, completed by the primary emergency health care provider at the time of admission to the emergency department, included demographics, mode of arrival, cause of injuries, type of injuries, severity of injuries, and disposition. Data were compiled and analyzed by a multi-disciplinary team comprised of a trauma surgeon, a trauma coordinator, a trauma registrar, a trauma physician assistant, and a trauma nurse practitioner. Results: There were 617 patients with 879 documented injuries included in the study. The most common injury was extremity injury (36%) followed by head/neck (26%), chest (20%), pelvis (10%), and abdomen (5%). Of the 617 patients included in the study, there were 3 (0.5%) deaths. The average injury severity score (ISS) for patients who died was 59.7. A quarter of the patients involved in the study sustained injuries that resulted in hospitalization. Ninety-two percent (n = 568) of the study sample wore no type of protective equipment such as a helmet or Kevlar vest. Conclusions: Horse-related injuries comprise a significant number of ED visits in western Montana. Velocity of travel, height of patient off the ground, and unpredictability of animals all lend themselves to several types of injuries: high-speed decelerating injuries, blunt trauma, penetrating trauma, and dragging-type injuries that range from minor to mortal. Little attention has been paid to the cause and prevention of these injuries. Protective equipment is under-utilized by most riders. Injury prevention programs stressing the potential severity of injury and the benefits of protective equipment must be made available to equestrians. Further investigation into the cause and prevention of equestrian accidents is needed.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T10:37:24Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T10:37:24Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.