Triage Tool Inter-rater Reliability Using Live Cases Versus Paper Case Scenarios

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/162979
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Triage Tool Inter-rater Reliability Using Live Cases Versus Paper Case Scenarios
Abstract:
Triage Tool Inter-rater Reliability Using Live Cases Versus Paper Case Scenarios
Conference Sponsor:Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Year:2005
Author:Worster, Andrew, MD, CCFP(EM), MSc, FCFP
P.I. Institution Name:McMaster University
Title:Research Director, Emergency Medicine, Hamilton Health Sciences
Contact Address:1200 Main Street West, Hamilton L8N 3Z5, Ontario, Canada
Co-Authors:Arlene Sardo, RN, MSN, ACNP, ENC(C), CNC(C); Christopher Fernandes, MD, FACEP; Kevin Eva, PhD; Suneel Upadhye, MD, FRCPC, ABEM
Purpose: Most published studies of triage scale inter-rater reliability assessment have been conducted using paper case scenarios. The objective of this study was to determine if this method of inter-rater reliability assessment generated significantly different measures from those generated from live triage cases. Design: This was a multi-center, prospective, observational cohort study. Setting: This study took place in emergency departments (ED) of two hospitals located in south central Ontario. Sample: A population-based random sample of patients triaged at two emergency departments during a 4-month period was included in the study. Methodology: During the study period, ED patients were simultaneously and independently triaged by two or three research triage nurses using a five-level triage acuity scale. All triage nurses were blind to each other's assessment and to the study objective. Six months later, the same nurses were asked to assign triage scores to paper case scenarios of the same patients who they had previously triaged. Each of the nine research nurses triaged approximately 90 cases. Results: The inter-rater reliability as measured by an intra-class correlation coefficient was 0.90 (95% CI = 0.87, 0.93) for the live triage assessments and 0.76 (95% CI = 0.73, 0.79) for the paper case scenarios. The mean triage score assigned to the live cases was significantly less than that assigned to the paper-based cases (3.17; 95% CI = 3.08, 3.26; p < 0.001). Conclusion: There is a moderate to high agreement between live cases versus paper case scenarios and the inter-rater reliability, although significantly different, is acceptable in both cases. It is impossible to determine which triage setting provides a more accurate triage score, but, in general, paper case scenarios receive lower triage scores than live cases.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Emergency Nurses Association

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleTriage Tool Inter-rater Reliability Using Live Cases Versus Paper Case Scenariosen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/162979-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Triage Tool Inter-rater Reliability Using Live Cases Versus Paper Case Scenarios</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Emergency Nurses Association</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Worster, Andrew, MD, CCFP(EM), MSc, FCFP</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">McMaster University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Research Director, Emergency Medicine, Hamilton Health Sciences</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">1200 Main Street West, Hamilton L8N 3Z5, Ontario, Canada</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Arlene Sardo, RN, MSN, ACNP, ENC(C), CNC(C); Christopher Fernandes, MD, FACEP; Kevin Eva, PhD; Suneel Upadhye, MD, FRCPC, ABEM<br/></td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: Most published studies of triage scale inter-rater reliability assessment have been conducted using paper case scenarios. The objective of this study was to determine if this method of inter-rater reliability assessment generated significantly different measures from those generated from live triage cases. Design: This was a multi-center, prospective, observational cohort study. Setting: This study took place in emergency departments (ED) of two hospitals located in south central Ontario. Sample: A population-based random sample of patients triaged at two emergency departments during a 4-month period was included in the study. Methodology: During the study period, ED patients were simultaneously and independently triaged by two or three research triage nurses using a five-level triage acuity scale. All triage nurses were blind to each other's assessment and to the study objective. Six months later, the same nurses were asked to assign triage scores to paper case scenarios of the same patients who they had previously triaged. Each of the nine research nurses triaged approximately 90 cases. Results: The inter-rater reliability as measured by an intra-class correlation coefficient was 0.90 (95% CI = 0.87, 0.93) for the live triage assessments and 0.76 (95% CI = 0.73, 0.79) for the paper case scenarios. The mean triage score assigned to the live cases was significantly less than that assigned to the paper-based cases (3.17; 95% CI = 3.08, 3.26; p &lt; 0.001). Conclusion: There is a moderate to high agreement between live cases versus paper case scenarios and the inter-rater reliability, although significantly different, is acceptable in both cases. It is impossible to determine which triage setting provides a more accurate triage score, but, in general, paper case scenarios receive lower triage scores than live cases.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T10:37:28Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T10:37:28Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
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