A Ten-year Tribute to Oklahoma City Emergency Preparedness: The Past, Present, and Future of Oklahoma City Emergency Departments

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/162981
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A Ten-year Tribute to Oklahoma City Emergency Preparedness: The Past, Present, and Future of Oklahoma City Emergency Departments
Abstract:
A Ten-year Tribute to Oklahoma City Emergency Preparedness: The Past, Present, and Future of Oklahoma City Emergency Departments
Conference Sponsor:Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Year:2005
Author:Brown, Conrad D., RN, BS, MS, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:OU Medical Center
Title:Director, Emergency Department
Contact Address:1200 Everett Drive, Room EB 328, Oklahoma City, OK, 73104, USA
Contact Telephone:(405) 271-5421
Co-Authors:Michael Gerten, RN, BSN, CEN
Clinical Topic: Following several disasters over the past 10 years, Oklahoma City emergency departments have created a network of cooperation. As part of this network, each prehospital entity has clearly defined roles and conducts frequent drills to ensure competency and preparedness. Oklahoma City recognizes the importance of facilitating shared resources and cooperation among hospitals. Several system improvements and program initiatives have contributed to the current state of disaster preparedness in Oklahoma City. Implementation: In 2002, the Metropolitan Emergency Response Center (MERC) was implemented to enable a networking program that allows hospital-to-hospital communication through one central source during a disaster. Education programs, such as hazardous materials (HAZMAT) and decontamination courses, have been coordinated by the Oklahoma City Emergency Management Authority and are provided to emergency responders. In addition, a metropolitan emergency department (ED) nurse-credentialing program prepares ED nurses to go to any metropolitan hospital to provide proficient emergency care to patients in the event of a disaster. Standardized disaster packets in the metropolitan area provide nurses working in any hospital with a uniform system for documentation of mass casualty patients. The MERC system frequently delivers drills without prior notice to ensure that hospitals respond appropriately. Ongoing evaluations are conducted to ensure the competency of each care provider and facility. Oklahoma City has implemented the Hospital Emergency Incident Command System (HEICS) at OU Medical Center, Oklahoma?s only ACS Level I trauma center and has plans to implement the system at all metropolitan hospitals. Outcomes: Biannual citywide disaster drills involving various scenarios, including biochemical exposure, have proven that Oklahoma City's networking program is an invaluable resource. Evaluations of the system have shown increased speed in patient transportation to health care facilities and the ability to spread patient load across facilities without overloading one or two hospitals. The MERC system has been shown to facilitate sharing of staff and physical resources. Recommendations: Metropolitan areas should evaluate health care resources and develop networking systems to aide in facilitating patient care during a potential mass casualty event. In addition, all emergency nurses should be educated and credentialed in disaster nursing to ensure that patients receive optimum care. Finally, all hospitals within a given network should standardize disaster practices and perform ongoing evaluations of emergency preparedness.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Emergency Nurses Association

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA Ten-year Tribute to Oklahoma City Emergency Preparedness: The Past, Present, and Future of Oklahoma City Emergency Departmentsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/162981-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">A Ten-year Tribute to Oklahoma City Emergency Preparedness: The Past, Present, and Future of Oklahoma City Emergency Departments</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Emergency Nurses Association</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Brown, Conrad D., RN, BS, MS, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">OU Medical Center</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Director, Emergency Department</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">1200 Everett Drive, Room EB 328, Oklahoma City, OK, 73104, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">(405) 271-5421</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">Conrad.Brown@HCAHealthcare.com</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Michael Gerten, RN, BSN, CEN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Clinical Topic: Following several disasters over the past 10 years, Oklahoma City emergency departments have created a network of cooperation. As part of this network, each prehospital entity has clearly defined roles and conducts frequent drills to ensure competency and preparedness. Oklahoma City recognizes the importance of facilitating shared resources and cooperation among hospitals. Several system improvements and program initiatives have contributed to the current state of disaster preparedness in Oklahoma City. Implementation: In 2002, the Metropolitan Emergency Response Center (MERC) was implemented to enable a networking program that allows hospital-to-hospital communication through one central source during a disaster. Education programs, such as hazardous materials (HAZMAT) and decontamination courses, have been coordinated by the Oklahoma City Emergency Management Authority and are provided to emergency responders. In addition, a metropolitan emergency department (ED) nurse-credentialing program prepares ED nurses to go to any metropolitan hospital to provide proficient emergency care to patients in the event of a disaster. Standardized disaster packets in the metropolitan area provide nurses working in any hospital with a uniform system for documentation of mass casualty patients. The MERC system frequently delivers drills without prior notice to ensure that hospitals respond appropriately. Ongoing evaluations are conducted to ensure the competency of each care provider and facility. Oklahoma City has implemented the Hospital Emergency Incident Command System (HEICS) at OU Medical Center, Oklahoma?s only ACS Level I trauma center and has plans to implement the system at all metropolitan hospitals. Outcomes: Biannual citywide disaster drills involving various scenarios, including biochemical exposure, have proven that Oklahoma City's networking program is an invaluable resource. Evaluations of the system have shown increased speed in patient transportation to health care facilities and the ability to spread patient load across facilities without overloading one or two hospitals. The MERC system has been shown to facilitate sharing of staff and physical resources. Recommendations: Metropolitan areas should evaluate health care resources and develop networking systems to aide in facilitating patient care during a potential mass casualty event. In addition, all emergency nurses should be educated and credentialed in disaster nursing to ensure that patients receive optimum care. Finally, all hospitals within a given network should standardize disaster practices and perform ongoing evaluations of emergency preparedness.<br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T10:37:30Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T10:37:30Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
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