Core Trauma Nursing in the Emergency Department: Improving the Care of the Trauma Patient

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/162984
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Core Trauma Nursing in the Emergency Department: Improving the Care of the Trauma Patient
Abstract:
Core Trauma Nursing in the Emergency Department: Improving the Care of the Trauma Patient
Conference Sponsor:Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Year:2005
Author:Dieter, Marie C., RN, PHRN
P.I. Institution Name:Lehigh Valley Hospital
Title:Core Trauma R.N.
Contact Address:1200 S. Cedar Crest Blvd., Allentown, PA, 18105, USA
Contact Telephone:(610) 402-0305
Co-Authors:Julie Albertson, RN, BSN, CEN, PHRN; Cheryl Lansenderfer, RN, BSN, PHRN; Rosemary Scheirer RN PHRN CEN; Laurie Cartwright, RN, BSN, CEN; Courtney Vose, RN, MSN, CRNP
Clinical Topic: Nationally, trauma is the leading cause of death for persons 1 to 44 years old and the third leading cause of death for all age groups. This magnet hospital, an acute care, 800-bed, Level I trauma center, is one of the largest trauma centers in Pennsylvania. To improve the care of the trauma patient, trauma leadership identified the need for a group of nurses dedicated to caring for patients in the resuscitation bay and throughout their stay in the emergency department (ED). Implementation: A committee comprised of trauma, ED, and nursing leadership identified the concept of a Core Trauma Nurse Team (CTNT) in late 2003. By early 2004, program development for the CTNT was in progress. The core trauma nurse was required to have a minimum of five years' experience in trauma nursing, as well as specialty certification (e.g., CEN, CCRN). In addition, an educational baseline was established, which required nurses to have training in cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), Advanced Cardiac Life Support (ACLS), Pediatric Advanced Life Support (PALS), the Trauma Nursing Core Course (TNCC), Advanced Trauma Care for Nurses (ATCN), and Prehospital Trauma Life Support (PHTLS). In March 2004, the CTNT was assembled and implemented in the emergency department. Outcomes: The CTNT is comprised of nurses who are experts in the care of the trauma patient. Their responsibilities include facilitating the trauma patients' care in the resuscitative phase, monitoring their status while in the emergency department, and expediting admission to their assigned units. The CTNT nurses function as leaders and educators for their peers in the emergency department and as liaisons to the trauma service, inpatient units, and ancillary departments involved in the care of the trauma patient. Through the CTNT, formal and informal trauma education is available to ED staff, and a CTNT nurse is on site 24/7 to provide resources to staff members and their respective patients as needed. Although in its infancy, the CTNT has improved trauma care at this institution. The trauma bay has been reorganized to facilitate access to supplies for timely care. In addition, the resuscitative process has been reviewed and revised in an effort to provide a hierarchical and orderly approach to resuscitation. Recommendations: Trauma patients in the emergency department can benefit from a team of experienced nurses with appropriate training who are dedicated to their care, such as the CTNT. It is recommended that hospitals implement a CTNT as an integral part of the trauma team. Such a team should support ED staff as leaders, facilitators, liaisons, and educators.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Emergency Nurses Association

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCore Trauma Nursing in the Emergency Department: Improving the Care of the Trauma Patienten_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/162984-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Core Trauma Nursing in the Emergency Department: Improving the Care of the Trauma Patient</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Emergency Nurses Association</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Dieter, Marie C., RN, PHRN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Lehigh Valley Hospital</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Core Trauma R.N.</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">1200 S. Cedar Crest Blvd., Allentown, PA, 18105, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">(610) 402-0305</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">Marie.Dieter@lvh.com</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Julie Albertson, RN, BSN, CEN, PHRN; Cheryl Lansenderfer, RN, BSN, PHRN; Rosemary Scheirer RN PHRN CEN; Laurie Cartwright, RN, BSN, CEN; Courtney Vose, RN, MSN, CRNP<br/></td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Clinical Topic: Nationally, trauma is the leading cause of death for persons 1 to 44 years old and the third leading cause of death for all age groups. This magnet hospital, an acute care, 800-bed, Level I trauma center, is one of the largest trauma centers in Pennsylvania. To improve the care of the trauma patient, trauma leadership identified the need for a group of nurses dedicated to caring for patients in the resuscitation bay and throughout their stay in the emergency department (ED). Implementation: A committee comprised of trauma, ED, and nursing leadership identified the concept of a Core Trauma Nurse Team (CTNT) in late 2003. By early 2004, program development for the CTNT was in progress. The core trauma nurse was required to have a minimum of five years' experience in trauma nursing, as well as specialty certification (e.g., CEN, CCRN). In addition, an educational baseline was established, which required nurses to have training in cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), Advanced Cardiac Life Support (ACLS), Pediatric Advanced Life Support (PALS), the Trauma Nursing Core Course (TNCC), Advanced Trauma Care for Nurses (ATCN), and Prehospital Trauma Life Support (PHTLS). In March 2004, the CTNT was assembled and implemented in the emergency department. Outcomes: The CTNT is comprised of nurses who are experts in the care of the trauma patient. Their responsibilities include facilitating the trauma patients' care in the resuscitative phase, monitoring their status while in the emergency department, and expediting admission to their assigned units. The CTNT nurses function as leaders and educators for their peers in the emergency department and as liaisons to the trauma service, inpatient units, and ancillary departments involved in the care of the trauma patient. Through the CTNT, formal and informal trauma education is available to ED staff, and a CTNT nurse is on site 24/7 to provide resources to staff members and their respective patients as needed. Although in its infancy, the CTNT has improved trauma care at this institution. The trauma bay has been reorganized to facilitate access to supplies for timely care. In addition, the resuscitative process has been reviewed and revised in an effort to provide a hierarchical and orderly approach to resuscitation. Recommendations: Trauma patients in the emergency department can benefit from a team of experienced nurses with appropriate training who are dedicated to their care, such as the CTNT. It is recommended that hospitals implement a CTNT as an integral part of the trauma team. Such a team should support ED staff as leaders, facilitators, liaisons, and educators.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T10:37:33Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T10:37:33Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
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