2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/162986
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Leadership Development for the Front Line
Abstract:
Leadership Development for the Front Line
Conference Sponsor:Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Year:2005
Author:Jost, Karen, RN, CEN, PHRN
P.I. Institution Name:Lehigh Valley Hospital and Health Network
Contact Address:Cedar Crest & I78, Allentown, PA, 18105, USA
Contact Telephone:(610) 402-8160
Clinical Topic: Any busy emergency department (ED) can relate to the necessity of having the right person in the charge nurse role. With the challenges that emergency departments face nationwide, it is essential that these charge nurses be developed and mentored into great leaders. Through the development and implementation of a Core Charge Nurse Group, we successfully created a strong group of nurses who lead and manage the emergency department effectively and efficiently, 24 hours a day. This team has become an empowered group of nurses who contribute consistently to the growth and development of the emergency department and the hospital network through our Hospital Professional Practice Model. Implementation: March 2003, the Core Charge Nurse Group was developed. Currently 21 emergency nurses within this group cover all shifts. Following the Professional Practice Model, the core charge nurses met monthly as a team, elected a chair yearly, created and maintained a charter, and received ongoing leadership development from a variety of leaders within the organization. Leadership development was promoted through expert guest speakers, including the hospital chief operating officer and vice president of clinical services. The team frequently attended hospital-based and outside leadership development conferences (including ENA?s Leadership Challenge). Members also were invited to participate on departmental and facility-wide committees dedicated to process improvement and professional development. These same nurses participated in projects focused on the reduction of ED length of stay. Through the Hospital Professional Practice Model, the core charge nurse team members have become empowered leaders throughout this institution and within the field of emergency nursing. Outcomes: A strong group of exceptional clinical leaders was developed to manage a busy Level 1 trauma center emergency department. Following the Professional Practice Model, this team strengthened the emergency department and solved problems utilizing its unique experiences and leadership abilities. Consistent development of the Core Charge Nurse group, with their involvement in process improvement, decreased ED length of stay consistently by 54 minutes per patient visit in 2004. Recommendations: Emergency departments that experience overcrowding and high volumes and want to reduce overall ED length of stay need a strong leader for frontline management. This type of leadership can be achieved through an empowered Core Charge Nurse team. This program can and is encouraged to be adapted to other units in the hospital network. Research should be done to determine the impact that implementation of a Core Charge Nurse group has on total patient outcomes and nursing hours within the department.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Emergency Nurses Association

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleLeadership Development for the Front Lineen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/162986-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Leadership Development for the Front Line</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Emergency Nurses Association</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Jost, Karen, RN, CEN, PHRN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Lehigh Valley Hospital and Health Network</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Cedar Crest &amp; I78, Allentown, PA, 18105, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">(610) 402-8160</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">Cheryl.celia@lvh.com</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Clinical Topic: Any busy emergency department (ED) can relate to the necessity of having the right person in the charge nurse role. With the challenges that emergency departments face nationwide, it is essential that these charge nurses be developed and mentored into great leaders. Through the development and implementation of a Core Charge Nurse Group, we successfully created a strong group of nurses who lead and manage the emergency department effectively and efficiently, 24 hours a day. This team has become an empowered group of nurses who contribute consistently to the growth and development of the emergency department and the hospital network through our Hospital Professional Practice Model. Implementation: March 2003, the Core Charge Nurse Group was developed. Currently 21 emergency nurses within this group cover all shifts. Following the Professional Practice Model, the core charge nurses met monthly as a team, elected a chair yearly, created and maintained a charter, and received ongoing leadership development from a variety of leaders within the organization. Leadership development was promoted through expert guest speakers, including the hospital chief operating officer and vice president of clinical services. The team frequently attended hospital-based and outside leadership development conferences (including ENA?s Leadership Challenge). Members also were invited to participate on departmental and facility-wide committees dedicated to process improvement and professional development. These same nurses participated in projects focused on the reduction of ED length of stay. Through the Hospital Professional Practice Model, the core charge nurse team members have become empowered leaders throughout this institution and within the field of emergency nursing. Outcomes: A strong group of exceptional clinical leaders was developed to manage a busy Level 1 trauma center emergency department. Following the Professional Practice Model, this team strengthened the emergency department and solved problems utilizing its unique experiences and leadership abilities. Consistent development of the Core Charge Nurse group, with their involvement in process improvement, decreased ED length of stay consistently by 54 minutes per patient visit in 2004. Recommendations: Emergency departments that experience overcrowding and high volumes and want to reduce overall ED length of stay need a strong leader for frontline management. This type of leadership can be achieved through an empowered Core Charge Nurse team. This program can and is encouraged to be adapted to other units in the hospital network. Research should be done to determine the impact that implementation of a Core Charge Nurse group has on total patient outcomes and nursing hours within the department.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T10:37:35Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T10:37:35Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
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