2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/162991
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Surviving Sepsis: Standard Protocols Improve Outcomes
Abstract:
Surviving Sepsis: Standard Protocols Improve Outcomes
Conference Sponsor:Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Year:2005
Author:Maynard, Amy Susag, RN, MS, CCRN, CCNS
P.I. Institution Name:Unity Hospital
Contact Address:550 Osborne Road NE, Fridley, MN, 55432, USA
Contact Telephone:(763) 236-4235
Clinical Topic: Every year in the United States, more than 750,000 persons develop severe sepsis or septic shock. Despite aggressive interventions, the mortality rate remains near 50%. The intent of this initiative was to identify rapidly the patient experiencing severe sepsis or septic shock in the emergency department (ED) and intensive care unit (ICU), provide timely intervention using a standard protocol, and improve patient survival. Implementation: An interdisciplinary team of emergency and critical care physicians, ED and ICU nurses, and pharmacists developed sepsis algorithms and protocols. These protocols formed the framework for a standard set of orders that began with patient presentation to the emergency department. The preprinted order sets for the emergency department and ICU were revised numerous times to reflect changes in evidence-based approaches to sepsis treatment. The following features were implemented as part of this initiative:
Colorful sepsis protocol algorithms were laminated and posted for display in the emergency department and ICU and included sepsis definitions, intervention priorities, and goals. ED- and ICU-specific sepsis protocol order sets were developed. Physicians and staff were educated about sepsis terms and key intervention goals. The sepsis protocol was packaged with other commonly needed order sets for care of these patients (i.e., mechanical ventilation, tight glycemic control, sedation and analgesia, and Xigris administration). Packaging of the appropriate order sets made it easier for physicians and staff to have all the needed tools readily available. Custom-made and prepackaged maximum barrier kits for central venous and arterial access insertion were ordered. Compliance with 4-hour and 24-hour sepsis bundle interventions was tracked. Outcomes: Each patient case that met criteria for severe sepsis or septic shock was evaluated for achievement of the sepsis bundle goals and use of the order sets. Use of the sepsis preprinted order sets rose steadily and compliance with the 4-hour and 24-hour sepsis intervention bundles was 80%. The mortality rate from severe sepsis and septic shock in this hospital decreased following implementation of this initiative?from 50% in 2003 to 32% in 2004. Recommendations: The use of evidence-based algorithms and protocols that are packaged in an appealing and accessible manner promote collaboration and excellence in the care of the sepsis patient. The tools developed at our facility are relevant for utilization in other institutions to identify and treat the sepsis patient rapidly to reduce mortality.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Emergency Nurses Association

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSurviving Sepsis: Standard Protocols Improve Outcomesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/162991-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Surviving Sepsis: Standard Protocols Improve Outcomes</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Emergency Nurses Association</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Maynard, Amy Susag, RN, MS, CCRN, CCNS</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Unity Hospital</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">550 Osborne Road NE, Fridley, MN, 55432, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">(763) 236-4235</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">amy.susag@allina.com</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Clinical Topic: Every year in the United States, more than 750,000 persons develop severe sepsis or septic shock. Despite aggressive interventions, the mortality rate remains near 50%. The intent of this initiative was to identify rapidly the patient experiencing severe sepsis or septic shock in the emergency department (ED) and intensive care unit (ICU), provide timely intervention using a standard protocol, and improve patient survival. Implementation: An interdisciplinary team of emergency and critical care physicians, ED and ICU nurses, and pharmacists developed sepsis algorithms and protocols. These protocols formed the framework for a standard set of orders that began with patient presentation to the emergency department. The preprinted order sets for the emergency department and ICU were revised numerous times to reflect changes in evidence-based approaches to sepsis treatment. The following features were implemented as part of this initiative: <br/>Colorful sepsis protocol algorithms were laminated and posted for display in the emergency department and ICU and included sepsis definitions, intervention priorities, and goals. ED- and ICU-specific sepsis protocol order sets were developed. Physicians and staff were educated about sepsis terms and key intervention goals. The sepsis protocol was packaged with other commonly needed order sets for care of these patients (i.e., mechanical ventilation, tight glycemic control, sedation and analgesia, and Xigris administration). Packaging of the appropriate order sets made it easier for physicians and staff to have all the needed tools readily available. Custom-made and prepackaged maximum barrier kits for central venous and arterial access insertion were ordered. Compliance with 4-hour and 24-hour sepsis bundle interventions was tracked. Outcomes: Each patient case that met criteria for severe sepsis or septic shock was evaluated for achievement of the sepsis bundle goals and use of the order sets. Use of the sepsis preprinted order sets rose steadily and compliance with the 4-hour and 24-hour sepsis intervention bundles was 80%. The mortality rate from severe sepsis and septic shock in this hospital decreased following implementation of this initiative?from 50% in 2003 to 32% in 2004. Recommendations: The use of evidence-based algorithms and protocols that are packaged in an appealing and accessible manner promote collaboration and excellence in the care of the sepsis patient. The tools developed at our facility are relevant for utilization in other institutions to identify and treat the sepsis patient rapidly to reduce mortality.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T10:37:40Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T10:37:40Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
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