2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/162995
Type:
Presentation
Title:
An Effective Decontamination Response Plan
Abstract:
An Effective Decontamination Response Plan
Conference Sponsor:Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Year:2005
Author:Micucci, Keith, RN, BSN, CEN, PHRN
P.I. Institution Name:Lehigh Valley Hospital and Health Network
Contact Address:1200 S. Cedar Crest Blvd., Allentown, PA, 18105, USA
Contact Telephone:(610) 402-8747
Clinical Topic: A contaminated patient represents a risk that few hospitals are sufficiently prepared to handle. An informal survey among our emergency department (ED) clinical staff identified significant knowledge deficits when dealing with patients contaminated by hazardous materials. A Patient Decontamination Response Plan provides the basis for this type of preparedness. It is much more than updated policies and procedures. An effective Patient Decontamination Response Plan should incorporate an interdisciplinary committee to ensure that patients requiring decontamination are appropriately managed and that ED staff is properly trained and protected. Implementation: The emergency department established a committee to review staff response to potentially contaminated patients. The committee was comprised of members from various areas within the hospital organization in addition to ED personnel. All members of the committee had prior training in hazardous materials. The committee developed an educational program designed to increase the knowledge of clinical personnel about proper patient decontamination procedures. Clinical personnel also were responsible for creating, maintaining, evaluating, and updating policies and procedures pertaining to the emergency decontamination of patients, staff hazardous materials education and safety, and all related training exercises. Three main priorities proved essential in developing this process. First, adequate supplies for patient decontamination must be ensured and all equipment must be in a constant state of readiness. Second, an educational session that incorporates hands-on return demonstrations by participants must be developed. Third, ongoing process evaluations must be conducted. Patient decontamination incidents were tracked and critiqued to provide insight into additional ways to improve the existing system. Outcomes: The ED clinical staff gained a thorough understanding about the safe management of patients contaminated by hazardous materials to prevent subsequent contamination. An on-call response schedule for committee members was added to the existing hospital call system, which provided personnel knowledgeable in hazardous materials incidents should their expertise be needed. The actual impact that these procedures have had upon patient outcome and staff safety is still being determined. Recommendations: For the ED decontamination process to be effective, staff must actively participate in continuing education and drills designed to maintain and improve their knowledge about hazardous materials incidents and hands-on patient decontamination skills. In addition, a method to measure and evaluate patient outcomes must be developed. This includes a way to evaluate the effectiveness of the prehospital-hospital interface and its impact upon patient outcomes.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Emergency Nurses Association

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAn Effective Decontamination Response Planen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/162995-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">An Effective Decontamination Response Plan</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Emergency Nurses Association</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Micucci, Keith, RN, BSN, CEN, PHRN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Lehigh Valley Hospital and Health Network</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">1200 S. Cedar Crest Blvd., Allentown, PA, 18105, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">(610) 402-8747</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">Keith_D.Micucci@lvh.com</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Clinical Topic: A contaminated patient represents a risk that few hospitals are sufficiently prepared to handle. An informal survey among our emergency department (ED) clinical staff identified significant knowledge deficits when dealing with patients contaminated by hazardous materials. A Patient Decontamination Response Plan provides the basis for this type of preparedness. It is much more than updated policies and procedures. An effective Patient Decontamination Response Plan should incorporate an interdisciplinary committee to ensure that patients requiring decontamination are appropriately managed and that ED staff is properly trained and protected. Implementation: The emergency department established a committee to review staff response to potentially contaminated patients. The committee was comprised of members from various areas within the hospital organization in addition to ED personnel. All members of the committee had prior training in hazardous materials. The committee developed an educational program designed to increase the knowledge of clinical personnel about proper patient decontamination procedures. Clinical personnel also were responsible for creating, maintaining, evaluating, and updating policies and procedures pertaining to the emergency decontamination of patients, staff hazardous materials education and safety, and all related training exercises. Three main priorities proved essential in developing this process. First, adequate supplies for patient decontamination must be ensured and all equipment must be in a constant state of readiness. Second, an educational session that incorporates hands-on return demonstrations by participants must be developed. Third, ongoing process evaluations must be conducted. Patient decontamination incidents were tracked and critiqued to provide insight into additional ways to improve the existing system. Outcomes: The ED clinical staff gained a thorough understanding about the safe management of patients contaminated by hazardous materials to prevent subsequent contamination. An on-call response schedule for committee members was added to the existing hospital call system, which provided personnel knowledgeable in hazardous materials incidents should their expertise be needed. The actual impact that these procedures have had upon patient outcome and staff safety is still being determined. Recommendations: For the ED decontamination process to be effective, staff must actively participate in continuing education and drills designed to maintain and improve their knowledge about hazardous materials incidents and hands-on patient decontamination skills. In addition, a method to measure and evaluate patient outcomes must be developed. This includes a way to evaluate the effectiveness of the prehospital-hospital interface and its impact upon patient outcomes.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T10:37:44Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T10:37:44Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
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