11.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/162998
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Home Improvement in the Emergency Department
Abstract:
Home Improvement in the Emergency Department
Conference Sponsor:Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Year:2005
Author:Rosenthal, Anna, RN, MS
P.I. Institution Name:Stony Brook University Hospital
Title:Nurse Manager
Contact Address:Nicolls Road and East Loop Road Intersection, Stony Brook, Long Island, NY, 11794 -7400, USA
Contact Telephone:(631) 444-8028
Clinical Topic: The nurse manager of the emergency department (ED) identified a need for an environment that improves staff satisfaction, nurse recruitment, and nurse retention. To fill that need, nursing leadership sought to address staff concerns by implementing a program to facilitate interdepartmental communication, enhance visibility of nursing leadership, increase staff involvement in decision-making, and improve educational opportunities. Implementation: All ED staff members were given two surveys. One was a hospital-wide tool on unit redesign, and the second focused on issues related to employee satisfaction in the emergency department. For example, staff members were asked what they found most frustrating and what could be done to improve their work environment. Based on survey responses, several initiatives were implemented. Six months and 12 months following implementation of the new initiatives, staff members were given the same surveys to evaluate changes in satisfaction. Outcomes: Survey results indicated that staff members were frustrated with issues, such as lack of visible leadership and educational opportunities, staff vacancies, and difficulties accessing equipment in the emergency department. Staff members indicated that they desired more education, better communication within the emergency department and among different departments, and increased opportunities in decision-making. To address these issues, staff was restructured and schedules were changed to increase the presence of staff educators and nursing leadership. Increases were made in educational instruction and opportunities to attend conferences. Staff nurse involvement in monthly meetings was increased. In addition, a unit-based quality improvement program and several multidisciplinary committees, chaired by staff nurses, were developed within the emergency department. These committees included the Patient Safety Medication Committee, Retention Committee, Peer Recognition Program, Staff Advisory Committee, Education Committee, and Stress-Reduction Program. Prior to these changes, the emergency department had 15 vacant positions. Following implementation of these improvements, department reputation and word-of-mouth led to increased recruitment and retention. Currently, there are no vacant nurse positions in the emergency department. The majority of frustrations and complaints indicated in the initial surveys were no longer present in follow-up surveys. The most common complaints that staff reported in follow-up surveys were lack of space and issues regarding patient holding in the emergency department. These issues are being addressed through a hospital initiative to expand the emergency department. Recommendations: These initiatives to improve the ED work environment promoted a culture of collaboration, professional growth, quality patient care, and patient safety. Creating an environment that promotes staff involvement can have a positive impact on recruitment, retention, and staff satisfaction.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Emergency Nurses Association

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHome Improvement in the Emergency Departmenten_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/162998-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Home Improvement in the Emergency Department</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Emergency Nurses Association</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Rosenthal, Anna, RN, MS</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Stony Brook University Hospital</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Nurse Manager</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Nicolls Road and East Loop Road Intersection, Stony Brook, Long Island, NY, 11794 -7400, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">(631) 444-8028</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">anna.rosenthal@stonybrook.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Clinical Topic: The nurse manager of the emergency department (ED) identified a need for an environment that improves staff satisfaction, nurse recruitment, and nurse retention. To fill that need, nursing leadership sought to address staff concerns by implementing a program to facilitate interdepartmental communication, enhance visibility of nursing leadership, increase staff involvement in decision-making, and improve educational opportunities. Implementation: All ED staff members were given two surveys. One was a hospital-wide tool on unit redesign, and the second focused on issues related to employee satisfaction in the emergency department. For example, staff members were asked what they found most frustrating and what could be done to improve their work environment. Based on survey responses, several initiatives were implemented. Six months and 12 months following implementation of the new initiatives, staff members were given the same surveys to evaluate changes in satisfaction. Outcomes: Survey results indicated that staff members were frustrated with issues, such as lack of visible leadership and educational opportunities, staff vacancies, and difficulties accessing equipment in the emergency department. Staff members indicated that they desired more education, better communication within the emergency department and among different departments, and increased opportunities in decision-making. To address these issues, staff was restructured and schedules were changed to increase the presence of staff educators and nursing leadership. Increases were made in educational instruction and opportunities to attend conferences. Staff nurse involvement in monthly meetings was increased. In addition, a unit-based quality improvement program and several multidisciplinary committees, chaired by staff nurses, were developed within the emergency department. These committees included the Patient Safety Medication Committee, Retention Committee, Peer Recognition Program, Staff Advisory Committee, Education Committee, and Stress-Reduction Program. Prior to these changes, the emergency department had 15 vacant positions. Following implementation of these improvements, department reputation and word-of-mouth led to increased recruitment and retention. Currently, there are no vacant nurse positions in the emergency department. The majority of frustrations and complaints indicated in the initial surveys were no longer present in follow-up surveys. The most common complaints that staff reported in follow-up surveys were lack of space and issues regarding patient holding in the emergency department. These issues are being addressed through a hospital initiative to expand the emergency department. Recommendations: These initiatives to improve the ED work environment promoted a culture of collaboration, professional growth, quality patient care, and patient safety. Creating an environment that promotes staff involvement can have a positive impact on recruitment, retention, and staff satisfaction.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T10:37:47Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T10:37:47Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
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