An Experiment in Process-oriented Training: Learning to Think Like an Emergency Department Nurse

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163007
Type:
Presentation
Title:
An Experiment in Process-oriented Training: Learning to Think Like an Emergency Department Nurse
Abstract:
An Experiment in Process-oriented Training: Learning to Think Like an Emergency Department Nurse
Conference Sponsor:Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Year:2005
Author:Wolf, Lisa, RN, CEN
P.I. Institution Name:South Nassau Communities Hospital
Title:Emergency Department Educator
Contact Address:One Healthy Way, Oceanside, NY, 11574, USA
Contact Telephone:(516) 632-3900
Clinical Topic: In an effort to alleviate chronic nursing-staff shortages in the emergency department (ED) of a New York community hospital, a plan was proposed to train newly hired, licensed, non-ED nurses to work in the emergency department. This plan included an ED educator whose primary role was to conduct an extended and thorough orientation program. The program included general hospital orientation and process-oriented training designed to teach skills relevant to ED nursing content, lab, and clinical experiences. The goal of the program was to train participants to function independently in a full section of six beds in the emergency department after completing 16 weeks of process-oriented training and orientation. Implementation: The ED-specific content of the training program focused on the process by which an emergency nurse interprets patient data to reach a differential diagnosis in conjunction with the rest of the health care team. This process entailed examining each major physiologic system using four questions: Where is it? (anatomy); What does it do? (physiology); What happens if it does not work? (pathophysiology, symptomatic presentation); and How do you fix it? (treatment). Additional process-oriented training included triaging fictional patients, evaluating symptom sets, and writing progress notes. Participants were trained to be flexible, open, and prepared to manage multiple responsibilities while performing essential initial interventions. In essence, teaching nursing processes in the emergency department facilitated participants to think like emergency nurses and to approach problems in the emergency department effectively and efficiently. Outcomes: Four licensed non-ED nurses participated in the 16-week program, which was facilitated by an ED nurse whose primary role was to conduct the orientation program. A self-administered questionnaire was distributed to participants and all ED staff one month following completion of the program. Questionnaire responses indicated that both participants and staff were satisfied with the orientation program and pleased with the participants' ability to function independently, comfortably, and competently in the emergency department. Six months following completion of the program, all participants continued to work in the hospital's emergency department. A second training program is currently underway, and a third is in the planning stage. Recommendations: Through an expanded orientation that includes process-oriented training, licensed non-ED nurses can be oriented quickly and effectively to function independently in the emergency department in an effort to alleviate nursing staff shortages. In addition, utilizing an ED educator whose primary role is to facilitate the process-oriented training can ease the burden and disruption of orientation, which often is assumed by ED staff.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Emergency Nurses Association

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAn Experiment in Process-oriented Training: Learning to Think Like an Emergency Department Nurseen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163007-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">An Experiment in Process-oriented Training: Learning to Think Like an Emergency Department Nurse</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Emergency Nurses Association</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Wolf, Lisa, RN, CEN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">South Nassau Communities Hospital</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Emergency Department Educator</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">One Healthy Way, Oceanside, NY, 11574, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">(516) 632-3900</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">Noblewolf3@aol.com</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Clinical Topic: In an effort to alleviate chronic nursing-staff shortages in the emergency department (ED) of a New York community hospital, a plan was proposed to train newly hired, licensed, non-ED nurses to work in the emergency department. This plan included an ED educator whose primary role was to conduct an extended and thorough orientation program. The program included general hospital orientation and process-oriented training designed to teach skills relevant to ED nursing content, lab, and clinical experiences. The goal of the program was to train participants to function independently in a full section of six beds in the emergency department after completing 16 weeks of process-oriented training and orientation. Implementation: The ED-specific content of the training program focused on the process by which an emergency nurse interprets patient data to reach a differential diagnosis in conjunction with the rest of the health care team. This process entailed examining each major physiologic system using four questions: Where is it? (anatomy); What does it do? (physiology); What happens if it does not work? (pathophysiology, symptomatic presentation); and How do you fix it? (treatment). Additional process-oriented training included triaging fictional patients, evaluating symptom sets, and writing progress notes. Participants were trained to be flexible, open, and prepared to manage multiple responsibilities while performing essential initial interventions. In essence, teaching nursing processes in the emergency department facilitated participants to think like emergency nurses and to approach problems in the emergency department effectively and efficiently. Outcomes: Four licensed non-ED nurses participated in the 16-week program, which was facilitated by an ED nurse whose primary role was to conduct the orientation program. A self-administered questionnaire was distributed to participants and all ED staff one month following completion of the program. Questionnaire responses indicated that both participants and staff were satisfied with the orientation program and pleased with the participants' ability to function independently, comfortably, and competently in the emergency department. Six months following completion of the program, all participants continued to work in the hospital's emergency department. A second training program is currently underway, and a third is in the planning stage. Recommendations: Through an expanded orientation that includes process-oriented training, licensed non-ED nurses can be oriented quickly and effectively to function independently in the emergency department in an effort to alleviate nursing staff shortages. In addition, utilizing an ED educator whose primary role is to facilitate the process-oriented training can ease the burden and disruption of orientation, which often is assumed by ED staff.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T10:37:56Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T10:37:56Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.