2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163008
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Ride Smart Equestrian Safety Program
Abstract:
Ride Smart Equestrian Safety Program
Conference Sponsor:Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Year:2005
Author:Smith Otoupalik, Shelley, RN, MSN, CEN, CFRN, EMT-P
P.I. Institution Name:St. Patrick Hospital and Health Sciences Center


Title:Trauma Nurse Practitioner
Contact Address:500 W. Broadway, Missoula, MT, 59806, USA
Contact Telephone:(406) 329-2736
Co-Authors:John Bleicher, RN
Injury Prevention Topic: An emergency/flight nurse conducted a five-year retrospective study in 2000 for her master's degree in nursing thesis. This research demonstrated that horse-related injuries comprised a significant number of all emergency department (ED) visits (two to three patients per week, year-round, with horse-related injuries) to a western Montana Level II trauma center. Extremity injuries were identified as the most common injury (36% of all victims), followed by head injuries (25% of all victims). Concussions were the most frequent reason for hospitalization. All reported deaths and long-term disabilities in this study were related to central nervous system injuries, the majority being head injuries. Fifty-four percent of the people injured were younger than 25 years old. Only one out of 482 patients involved in the study reported wearing a helmet at the time of injury. It was noted that at this facility more victims of horse-related crashes were seen in the emergency department than were victims of motorcycle-related crashes. The Ride Smart Equestrian Safety Program was developed because of these staggering numbers to increase safety awareness and the use of safety equipment (especially helmets) and to decrease the number and severity of head injuries resulting from horse-related injuries. Implementation: This program was developed and implemented by an emergency/flight nurse. The Ride Smart Equestrian Safety Program provides injury prevention education and affordable equestrian helmets to local riders. The program is provided at no cost to any interested group. It consists of a didactic presentation and hands-on demonstrations. Pre- and post-surveys on the use of equestrian helmets were conducted. Certified equestrian helmets are provided at the cost of $5.00 (average retail price $25.00 to $150.00). Proper fitting, use and care of equestrian helmets are important parts of the presentation. Program impact and effectiveness is measured using a pre- and post-presentation survey. Outcomes: Since its inception in 2001, more than 3,000 equestrians have attended the Ride Smart Equestrian Safety Program. The program has also distributed more than 2,000 helmets throughout Montana. More than 90% of these helmets were distributed to youth riders (1 to 18 years old). Post-presentation survey results indicated that 92% of the riders intended to change their practice and wear helmets every time they ride. Continuing research by the author, looking at all horse-related injuries and deaths presenting to 16 hospitals in western Montana, shows an 8% increase in the frequency of helmet use in people presenting to the emergency department during the three years following the implementation of outreach education. Recommendations: The Ride Smart Equestrian Safety Program can be implemented in any region with a large number of horse-related injuries. Introducing the program into other regions should be explored. Additional research is needed into the cause and prevention of horse-related injuries.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Emergency Nurses Association

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleRide Smart Equestrian Safety Programen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163008-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Ride Smart Equestrian Safety Program</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Emergency Nurses Association</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Smith Otoupalik, Shelley, RN, MSN, CEN, CFRN, EMT-P</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">St. Patrick Hospital and Health Sciences Center<br/><br/><br/></td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Trauma Nurse Practitioner</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">500 W. Broadway, Missoula, MT, 59806, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">(406) 329-2736</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">sotoupalik@saintpatrick.org</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">John Bleicher, RN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Injury Prevention Topic: An emergency/flight nurse conducted a five-year retrospective study in 2000 for her master's degree in nursing thesis. This research demonstrated that horse-related injuries comprised a significant number of all emergency department (ED) visits (two to three patients per week, year-round, with horse-related injuries) to a western Montana Level II trauma center. Extremity injuries were identified as the most common injury (36% of all victims), followed by head injuries (25% of all victims). Concussions were the most frequent reason for hospitalization. All reported deaths and long-term disabilities in this study were related to central nervous system injuries, the majority being head injuries. Fifty-four percent of the people injured were younger than 25 years old. Only one out of 482 patients involved in the study reported wearing a helmet at the time of injury. It was noted that at this facility more victims of horse-related crashes were seen in the emergency department than were victims of motorcycle-related crashes. The Ride Smart Equestrian Safety Program was developed because of these staggering numbers to increase safety awareness and the use of safety equipment (especially helmets) and to decrease the number and severity of head injuries resulting from horse-related injuries. Implementation: This program was developed and implemented by an emergency/flight nurse. The Ride Smart Equestrian Safety Program provides injury prevention education and affordable equestrian helmets to local riders. The program is provided at no cost to any interested group. It consists of a didactic presentation and hands-on demonstrations. Pre- and post-surveys on the use of equestrian helmets were conducted. Certified equestrian helmets are provided at the cost of $5.00 (average retail price $25.00 to $150.00). Proper fitting, use and care of equestrian helmets are important parts of the presentation. Program impact and effectiveness is measured using a pre- and post-presentation survey. Outcomes: Since its inception in 2001, more than 3,000 equestrians have attended the Ride Smart Equestrian Safety Program. The program has also distributed more than 2,000 helmets throughout Montana. More than 90% of these helmets were distributed to youth riders (1 to 18 years old). Post-presentation survey results indicated that 92% of the riders intended to change their practice and wear helmets every time they ride. Continuing research by the author, looking at all horse-related injuries and deaths presenting to 16 hospitals in western Montana, shows an 8% increase in the frequency of helmet use in people presenting to the emergency department during the three years following the implementation of outreach education. Recommendations: The Ride Smart Equestrian Safety Program can be implemented in any region with a large number of horse-related injuries. Introducing the program into other regions should be explored. Additional research is needed into the cause and prevention of horse-related injuries.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T10:37:57Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T10:37:57Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
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