10.00
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163011
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Competency Project
Abstract:
The Competency Project
Conference Sponsor:Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Year:2005
Author:Meyer, Diana, RN, MSN, CCRN, CEN
P.I. Institution Name:St. Joseph Hospital
Title:Clinical Nurse Specialist, Emergency Service
Contact Address:2901 Squalicum Parkway, Bellingham, WA, 98248, USA
Contact Telephone:(360) 738-6300
Co-Authors:S. Lynne Brengman, RN, BSN, MBA; Carolyn Walljasper, BA
Purpose: The numerous hours, days, weeks spent in assuring that employee files accurately reflect the completion of orientation is frustrating and a poor use of time. The purpose of this project was to develop an electronic system for tracking and documenting the completion of the orientation competency checklist. Design: This quality improvement project was a collaborative effort between management, education and training specialists, information technology, human resources, and the clinical nurse specialists. Setting: A 253-bed, two-campus medical center in the Pacific Northwest that is the pilot region for the system-wide competency project. Methods: The project development began by creating an electronic database of our nursing job descriptions that are based on Nursing Interventions Classifications (NIC). Although each NIC from the job description is represented on the electronic orientation competency checklist, it is not necessary to validate all of them during orientation. Under the guidance of the clinical nurse specialists, over 100 nurses (13% of total staff nurses), representing 20 clinical areas, participated in the development of the electronic checklist by identifying which NICSs needed validation during the orientation process. The clinical nurse specialist determined which competencies could be validated by self-assessment and which needed to be validated by observation of practice. All competencies requiring validation by observation need both the orientee and the preceptor to electronically sign off that the required performance standard has been met. NICs identified as needing validation are linked to resources (policies, procedures, educational material) and to requirements (must read policies, computer based training, etc.) that must be completed during orientation. Results: The first phase of feedback on the electronic orientation competency checklist consisted of 50 nurses, representing both preceptors and orientees, who evaluated the tool to assure that the clinical needs in their units were represented. Most notably, while 95% found the electronic orientation competency checklist was inclusive of all the orientation needs, 82% found the navigation in the tool to be awkward and not intuitive. One of the most frequent feedback statements was that it "took too many clicks to get where I wanted to be". After revising the tool based on first feedback, two preceptor/orientee pairs piloted the electronic orientation competency checklist in the emergency department. Despite a few technical glitches, the staff involved evaluated this method of documenting and tracking the needs of orientation as superior to the standard paper format. The staff has made excellent suggestions for improvement that are currently being integrated into the revised electronic tool. Recommendations: Providing preceptors and orientees with electronic tools for orientation competency validation will eliminate one of the major frustrations for managers and human resources, the tracking of the paperwork proof that the goals of orientation have been met. Further development of this format for assuring accurate record keeping of annual and just in time competency validation is the next step.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Emergency Nurses Association

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Competency Projecten_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163011-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Competency Project</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Emergency Nurses Association</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Meyer, Diana, RN, MSN, CCRN, CEN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">St. Joseph Hospital</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Clinical Nurse Specialist, Emergency Service</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">2901 Squalicum Parkway, Bellingham, WA, 98248, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">(360) 738-6300</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">dmeyer@peacehealth.org</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">S. Lynne Brengman, RN, BSN, MBA; Carolyn Walljasper, BA<br/></td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: The numerous hours, days, weeks spent in assuring that employee files accurately reflect the completion of orientation is frustrating and a poor use of time. The purpose of this project was to develop an electronic system for tracking and documenting the completion of the orientation competency checklist. Design: This quality improvement project was a collaborative effort between management, education and training specialists, information technology, human resources, and the clinical nurse specialists. Setting: A 253-bed, two-campus medical center in the Pacific Northwest that is the pilot region for the system-wide competency project. Methods: The project development began by creating an electronic database of our nursing job descriptions that are based on Nursing Interventions Classifications (NIC). Although each NIC from the job description is represented on the electronic orientation competency checklist, it is not necessary to validate all of them during orientation. Under the guidance of the clinical nurse specialists, over 100 nurses (13% of total staff nurses), representing 20 clinical areas, participated in the development of the electronic checklist by identifying which NICSs needed validation during the orientation process. The clinical nurse specialist determined which competencies could be validated by self-assessment and which needed to be validated by observation of practice. All competencies requiring validation by observation need both the orientee and the preceptor to electronically sign off that the required performance standard has been met. NICs identified as needing validation are linked to resources (policies, procedures, educational material) and to requirements (must read policies, computer based training, etc.) that must be completed during orientation. Results: The first phase of feedback on the electronic orientation competency checklist consisted of 50 nurses, representing both preceptors and orientees, who evaluated the tool to assure that the clinical needs in their units were represented. Most notably, while 95% found the electronic orientation competency checklist was inclusive of all the orientation needs, 82% found the navigation in the tool to be awkward and not intuitive. One of the most frequent feedback statements was that it &quot;took too many clicks to get where I wanted to be&quot;. After revising the tool based on first feedback, two preceptor/orientee pairs piloted the electronic orientation competency checklist in the emergency department. Despite a few technical glitches, the staff involved evaluated this method of documenting and tracking the needs of orientation as superior to the standard paper format. The staff has made excellent suggestions for improvement that are currently being integrated into the revised electronic tool. Recommendations: Providing preceptors and orientees with electronic tools for orientation competency validation will eliminate one of the major frustrations for managers and human resources, the tracking of the paperwork proof that the goals of orientation have been met. Further development of this format for assuring accurate record keeping of annual and just in time competency validation is the next step.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T10:38:00Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T10:38:00Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
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