2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163016
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Multidimensional Heart Care: Technology and Teamwork Improve Patient Care
Abstract:
Multidimensional Heart Care: Technology and Teamwork Improve Patient Care
Conference Sponsor:Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Year:2005
Author:Zimmerman, John S., MD, F.A.C.E.P.
P.I. Institution Name:Aultman Health Foundation
Title:Chairman, Emergency Medicine, Aultman Hospital
President, Canton Aultman Emergency Physicians, Inc.
Contact Address:2600 Sixth Street SW, Canton, OH, 44710 - 1799, USA
Contact Telephone:(330) 363-6938
Co-Authors:Liz Edmunds, RN, MSN; Troy Heavelyn, RN, BSN; Cindy Henry, RN, CEN; Mark N. Resanovich, EMT-P; Laurie Fitzgibbon, RN, BSN; Angela Oberster, RN; Susanne Eakin, RN; Mark Marchetta, BS, RN, NREMT-P; Kristen DeDent, BA
Purpose: To decrease the time to treatment for patients presenting to the emergency department (ED) with chest pain (CP) and ST-elevation acute myocardial infarction (STAMI). Specifically, the goals were to: (1) streamline and decrease in-hospital door to ECG turnaround time to <10 minutes for patients presenting to the ED with complaint of CP (2) streamline the in-hospital process of door to reperfusion turnaround time for patients presenting to the ED with STAMI to <90 minutes (3) utilize EMS in obtaining and transmitting a digital, diagnostic quality twelve-lead ECG prior to patient's arrival at the hospital to support goals (1) and (2). Design: Internal process improvement initiative. Setting: An urban, Level II trauma center with 75,000 visits per year. Participants: All patients presenting with CP and/or STAMI. Methods: The Six Sigma methodology was utilized. The Six Sigma approach to problem solving includes using data and statistical analysis to decrease defects and reduce the variability in a process. A Six Sigma process is nearly perfect with only 3.4 defects per million opportunities. This disciplined and structured methodology includes five phases: Define, Measure, Analyze, Improve, and Control. Sigma for door to ECG turnaround time was established through before and after sampling of data with n=52 and n=70, respectively. Baseline Sigma for door to reperfusion turnaround time was established by chart review for calendar year 2003 (N=117). Post-implementation chart review is ongoing. Results: Door to ECG mean turnaround time decreased from 21.7 minutes to 5.0 minutes while Sigma increased from 0.62 to 2.87. Door to reperfusion mean turnaround time decreased from 119.0 minutes to 84.9 minutes while Sigma increased from 1.10 to 1.90. Furthermore, the integration of EMS and data transmission technology decreased door to perfusion times to an average of 84.0 minutes with individual door to perfusion times of 17 minutes and 26 minutes. Recommendations: Teamwork and technology can be combined to positively influence patient outcomes. Department management and staff should cultivate mutually beneficial relationships with both internal and external entities in order to positively affect patient outcomes. In addition, management should seek and employ the latest technology in order to serve our patient's needs.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Emergency Nurses Association

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMultidimensional Heart Care: Technology and Teamwork Improve Patient Careen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163016-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Multidimensional Heart Care: Technology and Teamwork Improve Patient Care</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Emergency Nurses Association</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2005</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Zimmerman, John S., MD, F.A.C.E.P.</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Aultman Health Foundation</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Chairman, Emergency Medicine, Aultman Hospital<br/>President, Canton Aultman Emergency Physicians, Inc.<br/></td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">2600 Sixth Street SW, Canton, OH, 44710 - 1799, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">(330) 363-6938</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">theavelyn@aultman.com</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Liz Edmunds, RN, MSN; Troy Heavelyn, RN, BSN; Cindy Henry, RN, CEN; Mark N. Resanovich, EMT-P; Laurie Fitzgibbon, RN, BSN; Angela Oberster, RN; Susanne Eakin, RN; Mark Marchetta, BS, RN, NREMT-P; Kristen DeDent, BA<br/></td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: To decrease the time to treatment for patients presenting to the emergency department (ED) with chest pain (CP) and ST-elevation acute myocardial infarction (STAMI). Specifically, the goals were to: (1) streamline and decrease in-hospital door to ECG turnaround time to &lt;10 minutes for patients presenting to the ED with complaint of CP (2) streamline the in-hospital process of door to reperfusion turnaround time for patients presenting to the ED with STAMI to &lt;90 minutes (3) utilize EMS in obtaining and transmitting a digital, diagnostic quality twelve-lead ECG prior to patient's arrival at the hospital to support goals (1) and (2). Design: Internal process improvement initiative. Setting: An urban, Level II trauma center with 75,000 visits per year. Participants: All patients presenting with CP and/or STAMI. Methods: The Six Sigma methodology was utilized. The Six Sigma approach to problem solving includes using data and statistical analysis to decrease defects and reduce the variability in a process. A Six Sigma process is nearly perfect with only 3.4 defects per million opportunities. This disciplined and structured methodology includes five phases: Define, Measure, Analyze, Improve, and Control. Sigma for door to ECG turnaround time was established through before and after sampling of data with n=52 and n=70, respectively. Baseline Sigma for door to reperfusion turnaround time was established by chart review for calendar year 2003 (N=117). Post-implementation chart review is ongoing. Results: Door to ECG mean turnaround time decreased from 21.7 minutes to 5.0 minutes while Sigma increased from 0.62 to 2.87. Door to reperfusion mean turnaround time decreased from 119.0 minutes to 84.9 minutes while Sigma increased from 1.10 to 1.90. Furthermore, the integration of EMS and data transmission technology decreased door to perfusion times to an average of 84.0 minutes with individual door to perfusion times of 17 minutes and 26 minutes. Recommendations: Teamwork and technology can be combined to positively influence patient outcomes. Department management and staff should cultivate mutually beneficial relationships with both internal and external entities in order to positively affect patient outcomes. In addition, management should seek and employ the latest technology in order to serve our patient's needs.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T10:38:05Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T10:38:05Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
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