Assessing Attitudes and Competencies of Clinical Staff Toward Electronic Health Records

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163017
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Assessing Attitudes and Competencies of Clinical Staff Toward Electronic Health Records
Abstract:
Assessing Attitudes and Competencies of Clinical Staff Toward Electronic Health Records
Conference Sponsor:Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Year:2006
Author:Andrus, Lynne C., RN, MSN
P.I. Institution Name:Seton Healthcare Network
Title:Registered Nurse
Contact Address:1601 Rio Grande, Suite 300, Austin, TX, 78701, USA
Contact Telephone:(512) 324-7387
Co-Authors:Colleen Mullins, RN, MSN
Purpose: The move from paper to electronic health records (EHRs) is challenging and expensive for health care organizations. Emergency department (ED) staff influence the early acceptance of EHRs because this department is often where EHRs initially implement within an organization. If the ED nurses believe a change is important and relevant to their practice, implementation outcomes tend to be more positive. This study assessed 203 ED staff and 2,180 other clinical staff for computer competencies and attitudes toward EHRs. Design: This descriptive study design ascertained ED and other clinical staff competencies and attitudes toward clinical use of computers and EHRs. An in-depth literature review indicated outdated and conflicting findings regarding skills and attitudes towards computers and use of computerized patient records in health care settings. Setting: A not-for-profit, multi-hospital system in Central Texas (7 hospitals and 3 clinics) participated in this study. Participants: 2,383 clinical staff participated in the study of which 203 were ED staff (141 registered nurses (RNs), 7 licensed vocational nurses (LVNs) and 55 clinical assistants). The research team was led by an ED registered nurse (and nursing doctoral student), a nursing practice director, and organizational and software company representatives. Methods: Participating staff completed a 15-question interactive online computer competency test assessing Internet and other computer skills. An optional on-line Likert-style attitude assessment on computers and EHRs was also available. Testing for instrument reliability and validity is underway. Using a train-the-trainer protocol, unit educators assisted employees who lacked basic computer skills needed to access the computerized testing and tracking system. Results: The response rate of completed computer competency tests was 56.1%. The 203 ED scores (8.5% of total scores) were compared to the study total of 2,383 scores including medical-surgical (23.2%), perinatal (12.8%), peri-operative (12.4%), internal agency (10.6%), critical care (10.1%), step-down (6.7%), pediatrics (6.7%), clinics (3.0%), behavioral health (2.6%), and other units (3.4%). Seven-five ED staff completed the optional attitude assessment (11.4% of the total 660 responses). Initial results indicate high levels of computer competency and favorable attitudes towards EHRs with comparable scores across job roles and nursing specialties (overall mean of 13.80 of a possible 15.00 points, standard deviation of 1.37). ED staff scores averaged 13.84 with a standard deviation of 1.40 and a median attitude assessment score of four out of a possible five. Recommendations: The next phase should target analyses of the research data, instrumentation, and employee demographics to focus on the most successful and cost-effective interventions to reach those employees who most need help with the transition to electronic health records within this hospital system and other health care organizations.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Emergency Nurses Association

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAssessing Attitudes and Competencies of Clinical Staff Toward Electronic Health Recordsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163017-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Assessing Attitudes and Competencies of Clinical Staff Toward Electronic Health Records</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Emergency Nurses Association</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Andrus, Lynne C., RN, MSN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Seton Healthcare Network</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Registered Nurse</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">1601 Rio Grande, Suite 300, Austin, TX, 78701, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">(512) 324-7387</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">landrus@seton.org</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Colleen Mullins, RN, MSN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: The move from paper to electronic health records (EHRs) is challenging and expensive for health care organizations. Emergency department (ED) staff influence the early acceptance of EHRs because this department is often where EHRs initially implement within an organization. If the ED nurses believe a change is important and relevant to their practice, implementation outcomes tend to be more positive. This study assessed 203 ED staff and 2,180 other clinical staff for computer competencies and attitudes toward EHRs. Design: This descriptive study design ascertained ED and other clinical staff competencies and attitudes toward clinical use of computers and EHRs. An in-depth literature review indicated outdated and conflicting findings regarding skills and attitudes towards computers and use of computerized patient records in health care settings. Setting: A not-for-profit, multi-hospital system in Central Texas (7 hospitals and 3 clinics) participated in this study. Participants: 2,383 clinical staff participated in the study of which 203 were ED staff (141 registered nurses (RNs), 7 licensed vocational nurses (LVNs) and 55 clinical assistants). The research team was led by an ED registered nurse (and nursing doctoral student), a nursing practice director, and organizational and software company representatives. Methods: Participating staff completed a 15-question interactive online computer competency test assessing Internet and other computer skills. An optional on-line Likert-style attitude assessment on computers and EHRs was also available. Testing for instrument reliability and validity is underway. Using a train-the-trainer protocol, unit educators assisted employees who lacked basic computer skills needed to access the computerized testing and tracking system. Results: The response rate of completed computer competency tests was 56.1%. The 203 ED scores (8.5% of total scores) were compared to the study total of 2,383 scores including medical-surgical (23.2%), perinatal (12.8%), peri-operative (12.4%), internal agency (10.6%), critical care (10.1%), step-down (6.7%), pediatrics (6.7%), clinics (3.0%), behavioral health (2.6%), and other units (3.4%). Seven-five ED staff completed the optional attitude assessment (11.4% of the total 660 responses). Initial results indicate high levels of computer competency and favorable attitudes towards EHRs with comparable scores across job roles and nursing specialties (overall mean of 13.80 of a possible 15.00 points, standard deviation of 1.37). ED staff scores averaged 13.84 with a standard deviation of 1.40 and a median attitude assessment score of four out of a possible five. Recommendations: The next phase should target analyses of the research data, instrumentation, and employee demographics to focus on the most successful and cost-effective interventions to reach those employees who most need help with the transition to electronic health records within this hospital system and other health care organizations.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T10:38:06Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T10:38:06Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
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