2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163019
Type:
Presentation
Title:
An Innovative EMS Partnership to Reduce Emergency Department Throughput Times
Abstract:
An Innovative EMS Partnership to Reduce Emergency Department Throughput Times
Conference Sponsor:Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Year:2006
Author:Gillespie, Gordon Lee, RN, MSN, CEN, CCRN
P.I. Institution Name:Patient Transport Services
Contact Address:420 Wards Corner Road, Suite B, Loveland, OH, 45140, USA
Contact Telephone:(513) 831-5999
Co-Authors:Mark Elam, RN; Marilyn Singleton, RN
Purpose: Freestanding emergency departments (EDs) provide full-service emergency departments with no attached inpatient facility. All inpatient admissions are transferred to area hospitals. When the freestanding ED?s throughput times (time from triage to discharge) are prolonged, congestion and patient dissatisfaction may occur. One factor for elevated throughput times may be the wait time required for ambulance transports. The purpose of this study was to determine if a pilot program in which a freestanding emergency department working in cooperation with a private transport service could reduce throughput times and ambulance response times (transport request to ambulance arrival). Design: This was a descriptive study utilizing retrospective chart review. Data variables included call type (emergency vs. non-emergency), triage time, time transport requested, time ambulance arrived, and discharge time. The design facilitated determining if throughput and ambulance response times decreased after one year of program implementation. Setting: This study took place at a freestanding emergency department working cooperatively with a private transport service located in southwestern Ohio. Participants: 1,369 patients transferred by the partnered ambulance service listed on the freestanding ED transfer logs from April 2004 to June 2005 were included for data analysis. Current institutional guidelines provided for ensuring patient confidentiality. Methods: Beginning July 2004, the transport crews began parking at the freestanding emergency department between transports to other customers and reporting their status to the charge nurse. The ambulance crews provided supplemental staffing in the freestanding emergency department between transports. As the crews had no other responsibility during this time, the transport company allowed their crews to supplement the ED staff in exchange for all transport business. Crew activities varied, dependent on scope of practice, state law, and medical director approval (e.g., venipunctures, intravenous therapy, and extremity splinting). Up to two crews were always available to provide supplemental staffing. The crews were not included in the freestanding ED staffing and not intended to replace registered nurses. The completed transports were grouped in 3-month increments from April 2004 to June 2005. The data management software, Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS), completed the variance analyses. The 3-month incremental groups served as the independent variable and ED throughput times and ambulance response times served as dependent variables. Results: Ambulance crews provided nearly 30 hours of staffing support per month to the freestanding emergency department. Overall, throughput times for non-emergency transports decreased by five minutes and ambulance response times decreased by fourteen minutes for all emergency transports. Recommendations: An emergency medical service partnership can positively influence throughput times for freestanding emergency department s and provide valuable staffing support. Based on these results, the program should be considered by all freestanding emergency department s where expedited transports are essential. Staff satisfaction surveys should be implemented to monitor the ongoing process.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Emergency Nurses Association

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAn Innovative EMS Partnership to Reduce Emergency Department Throughput Timesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163019-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">An Innovative EMS Partnership to Reduce Emergency Department Throughput Times</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Emergency Nurses Association</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Gillespie, Gordon Lee, RN, MSN, CEN, CCRN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Patient Transport Services</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">420 Wards Corner Road, Suite B, Loveland, OH, 45140, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">(513) 831-5999</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">gillesgl@yahoo.com</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Mark Elam, RN; Marilyn Singleton, RN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: Freestanding emergency departments (EDs) provide full-service emergency departments with no attached inpatient facility. All inpatient admissions are transferred to area hospitals. When the freestanding ED?s throughput times (time from triage to discharge) are prolonged, congestion and patient dissatisfaction may occur. One factor for elevated throughput times may be the wait time required for ambulance transports. The purpose of this study was to determine if a pilot program in which a freestanding emergency department working in cooperation with a private transport service could reduce throughput times and ambulance response times (transport request to ambulance arrival). Design: This was a descriptive study utilizing retrospective chart review. Data variables included call type (emergency vs. non-emergency), triage time, time transport requested, time ambulance arrived, and discharge time. The design facilitated determining if throughput and ambulance response times decreased after one year of program implementation. Setting: This study took place at a freestanding emergency department working cooperatively with a private transport service located in southwestern Ohio. Participants: 1,369 patients transferred by the partnered ambulance service listed on the freestanding ED transfer logs from April 2004 to June 2005 were included for data analysis. Current institutional guidelines provided for ensuring patient confidentiality. Methods: Beginning July 2004, the transport crews began parking at the freestanding emergency department between transports to other customers and reporting their status to the charge nurse. The ambulance crews provided supplemental staffing in the freestanding emergency department between transports. As the crews had no other responsibility during this time, the transport company allowed their crews to supplement the ED staff in exchange for all transport business. Crew activities varied, dependent on scope of practice, state law, and medical director approval (e.g., venipunctures, intravenous therapy, and extremity splinting). Up to two crews were always available to provide supplemental staffing. The crews were not included in the freestanding ED staffing and not intended to replace registered nurses. The completed transports were grouped in 3-month increments from April 2004 to June 2005. The data management software, Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS), completed the variance analyses. The 3-month incremental groups served as the independent variable and ED throughput times and ambulance response times served as dependent variables. Results: Ambulance crews provided nearly 30 hours of staffing support per month to the freestanding emergency department. Overall, throughput times for non-emergency transports decreased by five minutes and ambulance response times decreased by fourteen minutes for all emergency transports. Recommendations: An emergency medical service partnership can positively influence throughput times for freestanding emergency department s and provide valuable staffing support. Based on these results, the program should be considered by all freestanding emergency department s where expedited transports are essential. Staff satisfaction surveys should be implemented to monitor the ongoing process.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T10:38:09Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T10:38:09Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
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