An Evaluation of the Sexual Assault Forensic Examiner Program in the Emergency Department

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163028
Type:
Presentation
Title:
An Evaluation of the Sexual Assault Forensic Examiner Program in the Emergency Department
Abstract:
An Evaluation of the Sexual Assault Forensic Examiner Program in the Emergency Department
Conference Sponsor:Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Year:2004
Author:Davis, Barbara, RN, BSN, CEN
P.I. Institution Name:Lehigh Valley Hospital and Health Network
Contact Address:1955 Cricklewood Cove, Fogelsville, PA, 18051, USA
Contact Telephone:(610) 402-2288
Co-Authors:Charlotte Buckenmyer, RN, BS, MS; Barbara Fadale, RN
Purpose: The emergency department (ED) is often the only source of care for sexual assault victims. In 1998, a Sexual Assault Forensic Examiner (SAFE) approach to sexual assault treatment was initiated at our facility. ED leadership continually reviews data to ensure the SAFE program remains effective and satisfies community needs. The purposes of this study were to evaluate the need for a pediatric treatment plan, and to compare time intervals, from assault to arrival at the emergency department. Design: The authors conducted a retrospective chart review of sexual assault cases from January 1, 2001 to December 31, 2002. Setting and Subjects: This study took place at a tertiary-care community hospital with three emergency departments across three sites. Records of all patients presenting to the emergency department with a sexual assault complaint were considered for this study, whether or not an exam was performed. Patients were included only if they presented as the victim, not as the perpetrator. Methods: SAFE nurses or study reviewers identified sexual assault patients using (1) SAFE logs and (2) data collection retrieved from the hospital database. All data were recorded on a collection form and entered into a database. Data were collected for the following variables: age, gender, time between incident and report, weapon, drug, alcohol, hospital arrival site, and examiner type. Results: The final sample consisted of 159 charts. The results showed that 42.1% of all victims were less than 18 years old, and 20% of those were less than 12 years old. Results also showed about a 20-hour decrease from 2001 to 2002 between the time of assault to arrival at the emergency department. Weapon and drug involvement occurred only in the 18 years or older group (12% and 13%, respectively). Drug use was negligible for patients less than 18 years old. Recommendations: Pediatric populations frequently are victims of sexual assault and require an age-appropriate pediatric treatment plan. Increased public awareness and education may have influenced a victim's willingness to seek care in the emergency department as wait times between assault and ED arrival have decreased. An involved management team was integral in assessing the program and continuing its implementation.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Emergency Nurses Association

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAn Evaluation of the Sexual Assault Forensic Examiner Program in the Emergency Departmenten_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163028-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">An Evaluation of the Sexual Assault Forensic Examiner Program in the Emergency Department</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Emergency Nurses Association</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Davis, Barbara, RN, BSN, CEN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Lehigh Valley Hospital and Health Network</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">1955 Cricklewood Cove, Fogelsville, PA, 18051, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">(610) 402-2288</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">barbara.davis@lvh.com</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Charlotte Buckenmyer, RN, BS, MS; Barbara Fadale, RN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: The emergency department (ED) is often the only source of care for sexual assault victims. In 1998, a Sexual Assault Forensic Examiner (SAFE) approach to sexual assault treatment was initiated at our facility. ED leadership continually reviews data to ensure the SAFE program remains effective and satisfies community needs. The purposes of this study were to evaluate the need for a pediatric treatment plan, and to compare time intervals, from assault to arrival at the emergency department. Design: The authors conducted a retrospective chart review of sexual assault cases from January 1, 2001 to December 31, 2002. Setting and Subjects: This study took place at a tertiary-care community hospital with three emergency departments across three sites. Records of all patients presenting to the emergency department with a sexual assault complaint were considered for this study, whether or not an exam was performed. Patients were included only if they presented as the victim, not as the perpetrator. Methods: SAFE nurses or study reviewers identified sexual assault patients using (1) SAFE logs and (2) data collection retrieved from the hospital database. All data were recorded on a collection form and entered into a database. Data were collected for the following variables: age, gender, time between incident and report, weapon, drug, alcohol, hospital arrival site, and examiner type. Results: The final sample consisted of 159 charts. The results showed that 42.1% of all victims were less than 18 years old, and 20% of those were less than 12 years old. Results also showed about a 20-hour decrease from 2001 to 2002 between the time of assault to arrival at the emergency department. Weapon and drug involvement occurred only in the 18 years or older group (12% and 13%, respectively). Drug use was negligible for patients less than 18 years old. Recommendations: Pediatric populations frequently are victims of sexual assault and require an age-appropriate pediatric treatment plan. Increased public awareness and education may have influenced a victim's willingness to seek care in the emergency department as wait times between assault and ED arrival have decreased. An involved management team was integral in assessing the program and continuing its implementation.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T10:38:18Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T10:38:18Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
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