2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163029
Type:
Presentation
Title:
ED/Lab Specimen Turnaround Time: Six Sigma Project
Abstract:
ED/Lab Specimen Turnaround Time: Six Sigma Project
Conference Sponsor:Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Year:2004
Author:Woitas, Maribeth, RN, BSN
P.I. Institution Name:North Memorial Health Care
Contact Address:3300 Oakdale Avenue, North, Robbinsdale, MN, 55422, USA
Contact Telephone:(763) 520-5550
Co-Authors:Kathy Willemsen, RN, BSN
Purpose: Delays in obtaining laboratory results can have a direct impact on appropriate diagnosis, timely treatment, and overall length of stay for patients in the emergency department (ED). This project's objective was to improve the laboratory test turnaround time (time of order to the availability of test results). Design: Six Sigma is a seven-step process in which a current situation is evaluated in-depth to quantitatively determine where the greatest opportunities for improvement exist. Several tools are used to examine the current situation, analyze the cause, act on the causes, study the results, standardize the changes, and draw conclusions. The Six Sigma methodology was used to improve and maintain efficient turnaround times. Setting/subjects: The study was conducted at a suburban, 34-bed, Level I trauma center/fast track treating approximately 70,000 patients per year. All patients in the emergency department (excluding fast track) who had a hemogram or basic metabolic profile (BMP) blood test ordered were included in the sample. Approximately 1,700 blood draws are completed each month in the emergency department. Method: Turnaround time data for the laboratory process, from ordering to results, were compiled before and after the implementation of a new blood specimen collection procedure. The pre-data showed that the major delay was between the time of the laboratory order to when the blood was obtained (an average of 22.3 minutes). A new method incorporating criteria-based blood draws was implemented. Based on criteria developed by the emergency physicians, registered nurses could have blood drawn and sent to the laboratory prior to the patient assessment by the physician. The blood specimens physically arrive in the laboratory before blood work is ordered by the physician. Results: Approximately 500 blood specimens per month are collected using the new criteria-based method. This method reduced the "order to results" times from an average of 45 minutes to an average of 15 minutes for patients meeting the criteria. In 1% to 3% of those patients, no later physician order for a hemogram or BMP is obtained. No negative outcomes have been identified. Recommendation: Criteria-based blood drawing decreased delays in obtaining laboratory results. This method is innovative, replicable, and effective with minimal cost and no negative outcomes identified to date. Future research should address differences in treatment and outcomes for ED patients using this criteria-based system. In addition, changes in efficiency and workflow of ED care and length of stay, as well as patient, nurse, physician, and laboratory staff satisfaction should be assessed.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Emergency Nurses Association

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleED/Lab Specimen Turnaround Time: Six Sigma Projecten_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163029-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">ED/Lab Specimen Turnaround Time: Six Sigma Project</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Emergency Nurses Association</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Woitas, Maribeth, RN, BSN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">North Memorial Health Care</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">3300 Oakdale Avenue, North, Robbinsdale, MN, 55422, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">(763) 520-5550</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">maribeth.woitas@northmemorial.com</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Kathy Willemsen, RN, BSN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: Delays in obtaining laboratory results can have a direct impact on appropriate diagnosis, timely treatment, and overall length of stay for patients in the emergency department (ED). This project's objective was to improve the laboratory test turnaround time (time of order to the availability of test results). Design: Six Sigma is a seven-step process in which a current situation is evaluated in-depth to quantitatively determine where the greatest opportunities for improvement exist. Several tools are used to examine the current situation, analyze the cause, act on the causes, study the results, standardize the changes, and draw conclusions. The Six Sigma methodology was used to improve and maintain efficient turnaround times. Setting/subjects: The study was conducted at a suburban, 34-bed, Level I trauma center/fast track treating approximately 70,000 patients per year. All patients in the emergency department (excluding fast track) who had a hemogram or basic metabolic profile (BMP) blood test ordered were included in the sample. Approximately 1,700 blood draws are completed each month in the emergency department. Method: Turnaround time data for the laboratory process, from ordering to results, were compiled before and after the implementation of a new blood specimen collection procedure. The pre-data showed that the major delay was between the time of the laboratory order to when the blood was obtained (an average of 22.3 minutes). A new method incorporating criteria-based blood draws was implemented. Based on criteria developed by the emergency physicians, registered nurses could have blood drawn and sent to the laboratory prior to the patient assessment by the physician. The blood specimens physically arrive in the laboratory before blood work is ordered by the physician. Results: Approximately 500 blood specimens per month are collected using the new criteria-based method. This method reduced the &quot;order to results&quot; times from an average of 45 minutes to an average of 15 minutes for patients meeting the criteria. In 1% to 3% of those patients, no later physician order for a hemogram or BMP is obtained. No negative outcomes have been identified. Recommendation: Criteria-based blood drawing decreased delays in obtaining laboratory results. This method is innovative, replicable, and effective with minimal cost and no negative outcomes identified to date. Future research should address differences in treatment and outcomes for ED patients using this criteria-based system. In addition, changes in efficiency and workflow of ED care and length of stay, as well as patient, nurse, physician, and laboratory staff satisfaction should be assessed.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T10:38:20Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T10:38:20Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
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