2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163032
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Implementation of a Core Charge Nurse Program in the Emergency Department
Abstract:
Implementation of a Core Charge Nurse Program in the Emergency Department
Conference Sponsor:Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Year:2004
Author:Buckenmyer, Charlotte, RN, BS, MS, CRNI
P.I. Institution Name:Lehigh Valley Hospital and Health Network
Contact Address:4538 Apple Tree Lane, Bethlehem, PA, 18015, USA
Contact Telephone:(610) 402-8112
Co-Authors:Cheryl Celia, RN, BSN
Purpose: Emergency departments (ED) nationwide are experiencing an unprecedented influx of patients. It is imperative that ED leadership assures efficient, effective management. Nurses are responsible for many daily operations of the emergency department and are often held accountable for deciding whether the emergency department should close and divert patients. Therefore, our institution implemented a core charge nurse program in an attempt to decrease diversion times, improve consistency with ED leadership decision-making regarding diversion status, and produce trained, skilled nursing leaders while decreasing ED staff turnover. Design: Over a one-year period, a team of core charge nurses was developed to determine if a core charge nurse program was more effective than the traditional charge nurse position that included all ED nurses. Setting/subjects: Approximately 26 nurses at a Level I trauma center emergency department were invited to participate. Methods: Development of the core charge nurse program by ED nursing management began in autumn 2002 and was implemented in March 2003. All ED nurses were encouraged to participate in development of the core charge nurse role. ED management, in conjunction with 10 registered nurses (RN), actively participated in role development. A committee met biweekly to establish criteria, roles, and responsibilities for the core charge nurses. Potential candidates were found among individual volunteers and those recommended by physicians and peers. From those recommendations, RNs were chosen to participate in the core charge nurse program. They attended educational workshops that focused on core charge nurse responsibilities and leadership development, including leadership styles, decision making, operation improvement, listening techniques, and confident communication. Results: Twenty-four nurses underwent training and education and assumed the charge nurse role. There was a moderate decrease in diversion hours, in addition to a reduction in staff turnover since inception of the core charge role.
Recommendations: The core charge nurse role is highly recommended for emergency departments seeking strong leadership and management of ED communications, staffing, and operations. Further studies are necessary to determine relationships between the core charge nurse group, job satisfaction, diversion hours, and lengths of stay for ED patients.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Emergency Nurses Association

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleImplementation of a Core Charge Nurse Program in the Emergency Departmenten_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163032-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Implementation of a Core Charge Nurse Program in the Emergency Department</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Emergency Nurses Association</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Buckenmyer, Charlotte, RN, BS, MS, CRNI</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Lehigh Valley Hospital and Health Network</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">4538 Apple Tree Lane, Bethlehem, PA, 18015, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">(610) 402-8112</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">charlotte.buckenmyer@lvh.com</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Cheryl Celia, RN, BSN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: Emergency departments (ED) nationwide are experiencing an unprecedented influx of patients. It is imperative that ED leadership assures efficient, effective management. Nurses are responsible for many daily operations of the emergency department and are often held accountable for deciding whether the emergency department should close and divert patients. Therefore, our institution implemented a core charge nurse program in an attempt to decrease diversion times, improve consistency with ED leadership decision-making regarding diversion status, and produce trained, skilled nursing leaders while decreasing ED staff turnover. Design: Over a one-year period, a team of core charge nurses was developed to determine if a core charge nurse program was more effective than the traditional charge nurse position that included all ED nurses. Setting/subjects: Approximately 26 nurses at a Level I trauma center emergency department were invited to participate. Methods: Development of the core charge nurse program by ED nursing management began in autumn 2002 and was implemented in March 2003. All ED nurses were encouraged to participate in development of the core charge nurse role. ED management, in conjunction with 10 registered nurses (RN), actively participated in role development. A committee met biweekly to establish criteria, roles, and responsibilities for the core charge nurses. Potential candidates were found among individual volunteers and those recommended by physicians and peers. From those recommendations, RNs were chosen to participate in the core charge nurse program. They attended educational workshops that focused on core charge nurse responsibilities and leadership development, including leadership styles, decision making, operation improvement, listening techniques, and confident communication. Results: Twenty-four nurses underwent training and education and assumed the charge nurse role. There was a moderate decrease in diversion hours, in addition to a reduction in staff turnover since inception of the core charge role. <br/>Recommendations: The core charge nurse role is highly recommended for emergency departments seeking strong leadership and management of ED communications, staffing, and operations. Further studies are necessary to determine relationships between the core charge nurse group, job satisfaction, diversion hours, and lengths of stay for ED patients.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T10:38:23Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T10:38:23Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
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