Implementation of a Full Capacity Protocol: How a Change in Policy & Practice Can Alleviate ED Overcrowding and Impact Patient Outcomes in a Level 1 Trauma Center

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163033
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Implementation of a Full Capacity Protocol: How a Change in Policy & Practice Can Alleviate ED Overcrowding and Impact Patient Outcomes in a Level 1 Trauma Center
Abstract:
Implementation of a Full Capacity Protocol: How a Change in Policy & Practice Can Alleviate ED Overcrowding and Impact Patient Outcomes in a Level 1 Trauma Center
Conference Sponsor:Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Year:2004
Author:Stark, Mary Jo, RN, CEN
Contact Address:9 Settlers Way, Setauket, NY, 11733, USA
Contact Telephone:(631)444-2909
Co-Authors:Karen Kelly Sproul, RN, MS, CEN; Carolyn Santora, RN, MS
Purpose: Overcrowding in emergency departments (ED) is a nationwide problem. It overextends ED resources, decreases access to emergency care, and decreases patient and staff satisfaction. In July 1999, our emergency department, not immune to these issues, received a Press Ganey Rating in the bottom one percentile for patient satisfaction. In order to improve its patient satisfaction ratings, a continuous quality improvement (CQI) steering committee was assembled at the executive level to address the impact of ED overcrowding on patient satisfaction. This project illustrates how a change in policy and practice can alleviate ED overcrowding and impact patient outcomes. Setting: The CQI project was implemented in a Level I trauma center in a large teaching university hospital. Methods: The CQI steering committee spent several months implementing initiatives to improve patient satisfaction, including enforcing compliance with the 11am discharge time, developing a discharge team, and identifying patients pending discharge. No success was achieved with these initiatives because inpatient units were not receptive to fixing what they considered an ED problem. To address the problem of delayed inpatient admissions, the hospital administration endorsed implementation of the full-capacity protocol. This protocol states that when the emergency department is no longer able to evaluate and treat patients in a timely fashion, patients awaiting admission will be transferred to acute-care hallway beds on inpatient units. Results: Since the implementation of the full-capacity protocol, patient satisfaction scores have risen to the eightieth percentile of the Press Ganey Rating. Emergency department staff also reported improved job satisfaction. Admitted patients, held in the emergency department, had a decrease in average length of stay from 6.2 days to 5.4 days. Unpublished hospital data revealed that patients assigned to an acute-care hallway bed received bed assignments faster than if they remained in the emergency department. Recommendations: The full-capacity protocol effectively addressed the issue of ED overcrowding and has had positive effects on patient and staff satisfaction. The full-capacity protocol is an effective tool that hospitals can use to meet the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations (JCAHO) standard on ED overcrowding.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Emergency Nurses Association

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleImplementation of a Full Capacity Protocol: How a Change in Policy & Practice Can Alleviate ED Overcrowding and Impact Patient Outcomes in a Level 1 Trauma Centeren_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163033-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Implementation of a Full Capacity Protocol: How a Change in Policy &amp; Practice Can Alleviate ED Overcrowding and Impact Patient Outcomes in a Level 1 Trauma Center</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Emergency Nurses Association</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Stark, Mary Jo, RN, CEN</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">9 Settlers Way, Setauket, NY, 11733, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">(631)444-2909</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">mjstark@notes.cc.sunysb.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Karen Kelly Sproul, RN, MS, CEN; Carolyn Santora, RN, MS<br/></td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: Overcrowding in emergency departments (ED) is a nationwide problem. It overextends ED resources, decreases access to emergency care, and decreases patient and staff satisfaction. In July 1999, our emergency department, not immune to these issues, received a Press Ganey Rating in the bottom one percentile for patient satisfaction. In order to improve its patient satisfaction ratings, a continuous quality improvement (CQI) steering committee was assembled at the executive level to address the impact of ED overcrowding on patient satisfaction. This project illustrates how a change in policy and practice can alleviate ED overcrowding and impact patient outcomes. Setting: The CQI project was implemented in a Level I trauma center in a large teaching university hospital. Methods: The CQI steering committee spent several months implementing initiatives to improve patient satisfaction, including enforcing compliance with the 11am discharge time, developing a discharge team, and identifying patients pending discharge. No success was achieved with these initiatives because inpatient units were not receptive to fixing what they considered an ED problem. To address the problem of delayed inpatient admissions, the hospital administration endorsed implementation of the full-capacity protocol. This protocol states that when the emergency department is no longer able to evaluate and treat patients in a timely fashion, patients awaiting admission will be transferred to acute-care hallway beds on inpatient units. Results: Since the implementation of the full-capacity protocol, patient satisfaction scores have risen to the eightieth percentile of the Press Ganey Rating. Emergency department staff also reported improved job satisfaction. Admitted patients, held in the emergency department, had a decrease in average length of stay from 6.2 days to 5.4 days. Unpublished hospital data revealed that patients assigned to an acute-care hallway bed received bed assignments faster than if they remained in the emergency department. Recommendations: The full-capacity protocol effectively addressed the issue of ED overcrowding and has had positive effects on patient and staff satisfaction. The full-capacity protocol is an effective tool that hospitals can use to meet the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations (JCAHO) standard on ED overcrowding.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T10:38:24Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T10:38:24Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
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