2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163036
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Medication Errors in Emergency Department Settings
Abstract:
Medication Errors in Emergency Department Settings
Conference Sponsor:Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Year:2004
Author:Hicks, Rodney, RN, MSN, ARNP
P.I. Institution Name:U.S. Pharmacopeia Center for the Advancement of Patient Safety
Contact Address:12601 Twinbrook Parkway, Rockville, MD, 20852 1790, USA
Contact Telephone:(301) 816-8338
Purpose: Medication errors are pervasive in today's health care settings. They are the largest component of all medical errors and are often preventable. Little research has been done on medication errors originating in emergency departments (ED). Design: This descriptive study involved a secondary data analysis of 3,440 medication error reports from emergency departments in 300 facilities. 2002 data from the national MEDMARXSM medication error program was used. Methods: Structured queries were performed to identify emergency departments as locations of error. Error outcome category, node, type, cause, contributing factor, level of staff involved, product reported, and patient outcome fields were included in the analyses. Case reports were analyzed for common themes and medication-use problems. Results: Emergency departments were ranked as the fifth leading location of medication error in 2002. The majority (94.8%) of 3,440 reported errors did not result in patient harm. However, 5.2% did result in various levels of harm, with two fatalities reported. Administering medications was the most frequently reported (49%) point in the medication-use process where the error originated. Improper dose/quantity and prescribing errors (27% and 22% respectively) were the most common types of error. Performance deficit was cited as the leading cause of error. Distractions were frequently reported. Nearly 400 unique products were reported with Heparin the most common drug reported in a medication error. Recommendations: The goal of reducing the risk of a medication error must be addressed through multidisciplinary and systems-related changes. Using a national database to identify trends in the nature and type of medication errors can assist the health care team in identifying risk situations and implementing appropriate preventive strategies.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Emergency Nurses Association

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMedication Errors in Emergency Department Settingsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163036-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Medication Errors in Emergency Department Settings</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Emergency Nurses Association</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Hicks, Rodney, RN, MSN, ARNP</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">U.S. Pharmacopeia Center for the Advancement of Patient Safety</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">12601 Twinbrook Parkway, Rockville, MD, 20852 1790, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">(301) 816-8338</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">rh@usp.org</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: Medication errors are pervasive in today's health care settings. They are the largest component of all medical errors and are often preventable. Little research has been done on medication errors originating in emergency departments (ED). Design: This descriptive study involved a secondary data analysis of 3,440 medication error reports from emergency departments in 300 facilities. 2002 data from the national MEDMARXSM medication error program was used. Methods: Structured queries were performed to identify emergency departments as locations of error. Error outcome category, node, type, cause, contributing factor, level of staff involved, product reported, and patient outcome fields were included in the analyses. Case reports were analyzed for common themes and medication-use problems. Results: Emergency departments were ranked as the fifth leading location of medication error in 2002. The majority (94.8%) of 3,440 reported errors did not result in patient harm. However, 5.2% did result in various levels of harm, with two fatalities reported. Administering medications was the most frequently reported (49%) point in the medication-use process where the error originated. Improper dose/quantity and prescribing errors (27% and 22% respectively) were the most common types of error. Performance deficit was cited as the leading cause of error. Distractions were frequently reported. Nearly 400 unique products were reported with Heparin the most common drug reported in a medication error. Recommendations: The goal of reducing the risk of a medication error must be addressed through multidisciplinary and systems-related changes. Using a national database to identify trends in the nature and type of medication errors can assist the health care team in identifying risk situations and implementing appropriate preventive strategies.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T10:38:27Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T10:38:27Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
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