2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163038
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A Comparison of Injury Patterns in Women after Consensual Intercourse
Abstract:
A Comparison of Injury Patterns in Women after Consensual Intercourse
Conference Sponsor:Emergency Nurses Association
Conference Year:2004
Author:Anderson, Sarah L., RN, MSN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Virginia Emergency Department & School of Nursing
Title:FNE Clinical Coordinator
Contact Address:PO Box 801458, Charlottesville, VA, 22908, USA
Contact Telephone:(434) 531-5760
Co-Authors:Sandra Annan, RN, MSN; Natalie McClain RN MSN PNP; Barbara Parker PhD FAAN; Scott Syverud, MD

Purpose: Because of the importance of documenting the pattern and extent of injuries in a sexual assault
examination, there is ongoing interest in identifying types and patterns of injuries following consensual
intercourse. Sexual assault nurse examiners are often asked during testimony if the injuries observed were
inconsistent with consensual intercourse. However, until more is known about the injuries following consensual
intercourse, comparisons are difficult to make. The specific aim of the study was to compare genital
injury findings from two groups of study participants: women who had consensual intercourse knowing
they would be examined for a study (Group 1), and women who consented to participate after they
had intercourse (Group 2). These studies were undertaken to further document and understand genital
injury patterns following consensual intercourse.
Design/Sample/Setting: A descriptive, comparative study design was used to study healthy females who
were examined within 72 hours of engaging in consensual intercourse. The study was conducted at a university
hospital emergency department by sexual assault nurse examiners. The sample consisted of 15
healthy non-pregnant female volunteers from 18 to 45 years of age who were recruited through flyers
placed in designated areas in the community.
Methodology: The women underwent colposcopic examination and photography of the external genitalia
using standard sexual assault examination techniques. The number and location of the tears, abrasions,
ecchymosis, redness, and swelling were documented. The documentation and photographs of all of the
cases was peer reviewed by experienced sexual assault nurse examiners individually and as a group to
determine percent agreement.
Results: Approximately one-third of the women in both groups were found to have some type of genital
injuries (tears, ecchymosis, and abrasions) after consensual intercourse. There were no statistical differences
between groups based on types, numbers, and location of injuries (X2 = .011, df = 1, p = .46).The
non-scheduled exam group had a higher percentage (20%) of abrasions (X2 = 2.32, df = 1, p = .06). There
were differences found in age (Group 1: 29.3 + 6.0 to Group 2: 22.1 + 3.8) (p < .05) using an independent
t-test. Condom use also was statistically different (Group 1: 19.6% to Group 2: 40%) (p = .05) using Chi-
Square.
Conclusions: There were no differences between the groups based on prior knowledge of the study
exam in the types, numbers, and location of the injuries identified. The Group 2 women (non-scheduled)
were younger and used condoms more often than Group 1. Additional studies with larger sample sizes are
needed to corroborate these findings. [Poster Presentation]
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Emergency Nurses Association

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA Comparison of Injury Patterns in Women after Consensual Intercourseen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163038-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">A Comparison of Injury Patterns in Women after Consensual Intercourse</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Emergency Nurses Association</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Anderson, Sarah L., RN, MSN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Virginia Emergency Department &amp; School of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">FNE Clinical Coordinator</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">PO Box 801458, Charlottesville, VA, 22908, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">(434) 531-5760</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">slm9r@virginia.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Sandra Annan, RN, MSN; Natalie McClain RN MSN PNP; Barbara Parker PhD FAAN; Scott Syverud, MD<br/><br/></td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: Because of the importance of documenting the pattern and extent of injuries in a sexual assault<br/>examination, there is ongoing interest in identifying types and patterns of injuries following consensual<br/>intercourse. Sexual assault nurse examiners are often asked during testimony if the injuries observed were<br/>inconsistent with consensual intercourse. However, until more is known about the injuries following consensual<br/>intercourse, comparisons are difficult to make. The specific aim of the study was to compare genital<br/>injury findings from two groups of study participants: women who had consensual intercourse knowing<br/>they would be examined for a study (Group 1), and women who consented to participate after they<br/>had intercourse (Group 2). These studies were undertaken to further document and understand genital<br/>injury patterns following consensual intercourse.<br/>Design/Sample/Setting: A descriptive, comparative study design was used to study healthy females who<br/>were examined within 72 hours of engaging in consensual intercourse. The study was conducted at a university<br/>hospital emergency department by sexual assault nurse examiners. The sample consisted of 15<br/>healthy non-pregnant female volunteers from 18 to 45 years of age who were recruited through flyers<br/>placed in designated areas in the community.<br/>Methodology: The women underwent colposcopic examination and photography of the external genitalia<br/>using standard sexual assault examination techniques. The number and location of the tears, abrasions,<br/>ecchymosis, redness, and swelling were documented. The documentation and photographs of all of the<br/>cases was peer reviewed by experienced sexual assault nurse examiners individually and as a group to<br/>determine percent agreement.<br/>Results: Approximately one-third of the women in both groups were found to have some type of genital<br/>injuries (tears, ecchymosis, and abrasions) after consensual intercourse. There were no statistical differences<br/>between groups based on types, numbers, and location of injuries (X2 = .011, df = 1, p = .46).The<br/>non-scheduled exam group had a higher percentage (20%) of abrasions (X2 = 2.32, df = 1, p = .06). There<br/>were differences found in age (Group 1: 29.3 + 6.0 to Group 2: 22.1 + 3.8) (p &lt; .05) using an independent<br/>t-test. Condom use also was statistically different (Group 1: 19.6% to Group 2: 40%) (p = .05) using Chi-<br/>Square.<br/>Conclusions: There were no differences between the groups based on prior knowledge of the study<br/>exam in the types, numbers, and location of the injuries identified. The Group 2 women (non-scheduled)<br/>were younger and used condoms more often than Group 1. Additional studies with larger sample sizes are<br/>needed to corroborate these findings. [Poster Presentation]</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T10:38:29Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T10:38:29Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipEmergency Nurses Associationen_GB
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